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Hillary greeted House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senator Diane Feinstein, Carole King, and a flock of California representatives at the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco to raise funds for Democratic congressional candidates.

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Longtime friend of the Clintons and celebrated designer Oscar de la Renta passed away on Monday.  Condolences to his family and friends.

The Clintons Celebrate Oscar de la Renta in New York

The Clintons Celebrate Oscar de la Renta at the Clinton Presidential Center

Hillary Clinton at the CFDA Awards with Oscar de la Renta

 

Fashion designer Oscar de la Renta dies at 82

By Jennie Matthew (AFP)

Legendary fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, whose beautiful clothes defined American elegance for generations and were beloved by first ladies and Hollywood stars, has died aged 82.

His company website bore only his trademark signature in white against a navy blue background.

US media reported his death at his home in Kent, Connecticut, quoting family members on Monday. He was diagnosed with cancer in 2006.

Read more >>>>

 

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

EleanorRooseveltHumanRights.png

Hillary Rodham Clinton

Remarks to the U.N. 4th World Conference on Women Plenary Session

delivered 5 September 1995, Beijing, China

Hillary Clinton Swears In Melanne Verveer Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks With Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Sir Michael Somare

Question: Prime Minister, could you tell us what more your government can do to try to reduce the very high rates of violence against women in your country?

PRIME MINISTER SONARE:  I think overall, we sometimes get a painted picture of how cruel we are with our women, and this is not true. This is a perception from people like yourself and people who write about us. That’s what they like to paint about this country. And I’m telling you that I have been around for a long time and I know that men and the women, sometimes there are fights, arguments do take place, but it’s nothing very brutal about violence against women…

… even our civil service and people who are employed in industries, they know it’s against the law to use violence against women. We have cases where people are drunk, which you know might (inaudible) a person who cannot control when he’s under the influence of liquor. And you find that sometimes (inaudible) it takes place in some places. We cannot deny it….

… we are doing everything possible, and through the education system alone and allowing the women to play a very important role in a society. That’s the only way we can overcome this problem. But all in all, sometimes it’s exaggerated by people who write about us.

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at Women’s Empowerment Event Papua New Guinea

In Afghanistan, U.S. shifts strategy on women’s rights as it eyes wider priorities

By Rajiv Chandrasekaran Washington Post Staff WriterMonday, March 14, 2011

A senior U.S. official involved in Afghanistan policy said changes to the land program also stem from a desire at the top levels of the Obama administration to triage the war and focus on the overriding goal of ending the conflict.

“Gender issues are going to have to take a back seat to other priorities,” said the senior official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal policy deliberations. “There’s no way we can be successful if we maintain every special interest and pet project. All those pet rocks in our rucksack were taking us down.”

Hillary and Melanne began calling Melanne’s office the “pet rock office.”  Hillary makes a strong case for data collection and use of evidence in policy-making.

Secretary Clinton in San Francisco

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks to the APEC Women and the Economy Summit

… there will be a temptation on the part of those observing or covering this summit, perhaps on the part of those of us attending it as well, to say that our purpose is chiefly to advance the rights of women, to achieve justice and equality on women’s behalf. And that is, of course, a noble cause to be sure and one that is very close to my heart. But at the risk of being somewhat provocative at the outset, I believe our goal is even bolder, one that extends beyond women to all humankind. The big challenge we face in these early years of 21st century is how to grow our economies and ensure shared prosperity for all nations and all people. We want to give every one of our citizens, men and women alike, young and old alike, greater opportunity to find work, to save and spend money, to pursue happiness ultimately to live up to their own God-given potentials.

That is a clear and simple vision to state. But to make it real, to achieve the economic expansion we all seek, we need to unlock a vital source of growth that can power our economies in the decades to come. And that vital source of growth is women. With economic models straining in every corner of the world, none of us can afford to perpetuate the barriers facing women in the workforce.

 

Secretary Clinton: Women, Peace and Security

Hillary does not mention this speech in this chapter, and I know I have linked to it many times over the years including in this retrospective.  To me it crystallizes the integrity of her thinking on so many issues.  Just in case you have missed this must-read, here it is once more.

Hillary Clinton’s Classic Speech to the Lower Mekong Initiative Womens’ Gender Equality and Empowerment Dialogue

Statement on Presidential Memorandum Promoting Gender Equality

I’m so pleased about the Presidential Memorandum that President Obama signed yesterday, which institutionalizes an elevated focus on global women’s issues at the State Department and USAID and ensures coordination on these issues across the federal government. And it is so important that incoming Secretary of State John Kerry has expressed his support for the continued elevation of these issues in our foreign policy.

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Secretary Clinton’s Comments on the Special Session of the Human Rights Council on the Situation in Libya

 

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at the Human Rights Council

It is time to overcome the false divide that pits religious sensitivities against freedom of expression and pursue a new approach based on concrete steps to fight intolerance wherever it occurs.

U.S. Accomplishments at the UN Human Rights Council

DEFENDING CORE PRINCIPLES

Protecting Freedom of Expression in the Context of Religious Intolerance: The United States was instrumental in galvanizing support for a consensus resolution that marks a sea change in the global dialogue on countering offensive and hateful speech based upon religion or belief. The “Combating Discrimination and Violence” resolution underscores the vital importance of protecting freedom of expression and ends the divisive debate over the highly problematic concept of “defamation of religions.”

U.S. Secretary of State Clinton listens to clergy as she walks out after Sunday service in Beijing

 

Hillary Clinton in Egypt: A Background Briefing

… she will be meeting with women civil society activists from a range of walks of life, some who work on democracy and education and health, some who work in the business sector, so a cross-section of women who also reflect the kind of deep diversity of Egypt’s civil society. And then she’ll be meeting with more than a dozen Christian leaders from across Egypt, who represent a variety of denominations – Coptic Christians, but other Christians as well – to hear from them about their concerns and to talk to them about what they plan to do to contribute to the democratic transition and to a new Egypt over time.

Hillary Clinton in Egypt: Day Two

… democracy has to mean more than just elections. It has to mean that the majority will be protecting the rights of the minority. And here in Egypt, we are committed to protecting and advancing the rights of all Egyptians – men and women, Muslim and Christian. Everyone who is a citizen of Egypt deserves the same rights under the law…

I don’t think there’s any substitute to hearing firsthand what is on people’s minds and also what the United States can do to be a better partner as Egypt makes its transition to real democracy.

 

Hillary Clinton at the Consulate Flag-Raising in Alexandria Egypt

… real democracy means that every citizen has the right to live, work, and worship as they choose, whether they are man or woman, Muslim or Christian, or from any other background. Real democracy means that no group or faction or leader can impose their will, their ideology, their religion, their desires on anyone else.

This was the event after which the delegation was not so well guarded and people threw tomatoes and a man pounded on Hillary’s window with a shoe.

Secretary Clinton’s Statement on the Murder of Ugandan LGBT Activist David Kato

 

Everywhere I travel on behalf of our country, I make it a point to meet with young people and activists — people like David — who are trying to build a better, stronger future for their societies. I let them know that America stands with them, and that their ideas and commitment are indispensible to achieving the progress we all seek.

This crime is a reminder of the heroic generosity of the people who advocate for and defend human rights on behalf of the rest of us — and the sacrifices they make. And as we reflect on his life, it is also an occasion to reaffirm that human rights apply to everyone, no exceptions, and that the human rights of LGBT individuals cannot be separated from the human rights of all persons.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, “Oh, Hillary, here you go again.”

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni at the London Conference on Somalia

Hillary Clinton Releases 2008 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks on the Release of the 2009 Annual Report on Human Rights

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks Upon Releasing The 2010 Human Rights Report

Secretary Clinton Releases 2011 Human Rights Report

 Hillary Rodham Clinton

Hillary Clinton Grants Benefits to Same-Sex Domestic Partners of Foreign Service Personnel

Hillary Clinton’s Remarks at the State Department LBGT Pride Celebration

… think about what’s happening to people as we speak today. Men and women are harassed, beaten, subjected to sexual violence, even killed, because of who they are and whom they love. Some are driven from their homes or countries, and many who become refugees confront new threats in their countries of asylum. In some places, violence against the LGBT community is permitted by law and inflamed by public calls to violence; in others, it persists insidiously behind closed doors.

These dangers are not “gay” issues. This is a human rights issue. (Applause.) Just as I was very proud to say the obvious more than 15 years ago in Beijing that human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights, well, let me say today that human rights are gay rights and gay rights are human rights, once and for all.

Hillary Clinton to LGBT Youth: Tomorrow Will Be Better

Secretary Clinton’s Human Rights Day Speech

Today, I want to talk about the work we have left to do to protect one group of people whose human rights are still denied in too many parts of the world today. In many ways, they are an invisible minority. They are arrested, beaten, terrorized, even executed. Many are treated with contempt and violence by their fellow citizens while authorities empowered to protect them look the other way or, too often, even join in the abuse. They are denied opportunities to work and learn, driven from their homes and countries, and forced to suppress or deny who they are to protect themselves from harm.

I am talking about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people, human beings born free and given bestowed equality and dignity, who have a right to claim that, which is now one of the remaining human rights challenges of our time.

CGI 2013 Day Two: Women Decision Makers

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Hillary Clinton Outlines “No Ceilings” Initiative at Pennsylvania Conference for Women

Hillary ends the chapter and her book with reflections about her mother, Dorothy Howell Rodham, who passed away in late 2011.  My heart broke for Hillary when her mother died.  I sat down and wrote a condolence note.  I wrote what was in my heart about her mom and  her loss.  I did not even keep a draft or a copy.  Several weeks later, quite to my astonishment,  I received a lovely thank you note from her.

Hillary Clinton: A Daughter’s Duty

Thing is, the business is never finished.  There is always more to do!

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Hillary Clinton’s ‘Hard Choices’ Retrospective: Introduction

Access other chapters of this retrospective here >>>>

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These are a few of the appearances Hillary will be making in the coming week.
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10/20/14
San Francisco CA
Fairmont Hotel
DCCC Fundraiser luncheon w/ Nancy Pelosi

10/20/14
Brentwood CA
Tavern
DCCC Fundraiser w/ Jeffrey Katzenberg

10/21/14
Aurora CO
Radisson Denver Southeast
Campaign Event for Mark Udall

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10/23/14
Manhattan
Women’s Equality Party Rally for Andrew Cuomo (sold out)
10/23/14
St. Paul MN
Macalester College Leonard Center Fieldhouse
Free rally for Mark Dayton

10/23/14
St. Paul MN
St. Paul RiverCentre
Fund raiser for Gov. Mark Dayton

10/24/14
Providence RI
Rhode Island College Reacreation Center
Campaign for Gina Raimundo

10/24/14
Boston MA
Boston Park Plaza Hotel
Campaign event for Martha Coakley

10/24/14
Scarborough ME
Scarborough HS
Campaign event for Mike Michaud

10/25/14
Charlotte NC
Charlotte Convention Center
Campaign event for Kay Hagan

At Oakland University,  Hillary spoke in support of gubernatorial candidate Mark Schnauer and Gary Peters who is running for the Senate seat being vacated by the retiring Carl Levin.

Our longtime friend, Jen the Michigander,  was in attendance today and generously shared this account.  Thank you, Jen!

The rally was held at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, a relatively affluent suburb some twenty miles north of Detroit. I drove out there with my father (who will henceforth be known as Dad the Michigander). Outside, the crowd was wrapped around the O’rena waiting for the doors to open. It was a nice, diverse group of people– black, white, Asian. Although the event was held on a university campus, I saw people of all ages ranging from senior citizens to a little boy of perhaps four or five, dressed up as Woody from Toy Story. Also among the young folks was a girl about ten years old who had a copy of “Hard Choices” tucked under her arm.

As we stood in line, we encountered two protesters carrying handmade signs that said something about Benghazi. They looked to be college-aged, but I don’t know if they were students at Oakland University or if they had dropped in from someplace else. The guy standing in line ahead of us heckled the protesters, which was fun to watch. (If anyone plans to see Hillary over the next few weeks, you might want to prepare yourselves for this type of thing.)

Since Dad the Michigander is a senior citizen who walks with a cane, a volunteer let us cut ahead in line. We went into the O’rena, found seats, and waited. And waited. And waited. About an hour and a half later, the rally began.

We heard from a number of Michigan Democrats running for various offices. Each one emphasized the need to make sure people voted because “when we vote, we win!” The “we” meaning Democrats, of course. Everybody stressed economic issues– school funding, student loan debt, jobs. Marriage equality and a woman’s right to make decisions about her own health care also came up repeatedly. I don’t recall hearing much, if anything, about foreign policy.

Hillary came out at the end, sharing the stage with Gary Peters who is running for Carl Levin’s Senate seat, and Mark Schauer, who is the Democratic candidate for Governor. Peters and Schauer gave their speeches first. It was good to see them in person. I think they should use portions of their speeches for their next round of ads. Again, the emphasis was on domestic and economic issues.

When the time came for Hillary to speak, the audience jumped to their feet and went nuts. I was near the back of the O’rena, but I could see her “grandmother glow” pretty well. She told the audience about Peters’s and Schauer’s middle-class backgrounds. She gave detailed information about how they fought to save the auto industry in 2008. As some members of the media have already noted, Hillary took a few shots at Mitt Romney without mentioning his name. (At least I don’t *think* she mentioned his name. I am remembering all of this off the top of my head.) Much of Hillary’s speech centered around the same domestic/economic issues that the Michigan Dems had stressed in prior speeches. Most effectively was the way she redefined the term “family values”, taking it back from the right wing so that it means raising the minimum wage, closing the wage gap between men and women, giving people time off– with pay– to take care of sick children or elderly parents, and enacting other policies that allow families to flourish. In closing, Hillary reminded us that Rosie the Riveter was from Michigan and that now we have Mary Barra cracking the glass ceiling at GM. The audience knew exactly where Hillary was going with *that* reference! But no, she didn’t make any announcements. 2014 comes first.

- Jen the Michigander

 

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Gary Peters just sent this email.

 

I just stood with Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

I looked over the crowd at Oakland University. The energy in the room — the excitement on peoples’ faces — reminded me what we’re all working for.

Every Michigander in that crowd, all of their families, and families across Michigan deserve a Senator who works for them. Not for the Koch Brothers or special interests. For them. That’s why Hillary was here in Michigan.

We’re coming into the final stretch here — and we need to be ready. Help us reach the $5OO,OOO we need by October 31st to keep going.

If you’ve saved your payment information with ActBlue Express, your donation will go through immediately:

Express Donate: $5

Express Donate: $10

Express Donate: $25

Or donate another amount.

Hillary’s with us. Everyone who was at Oakland University tonight is ready to bring this thing home.

I hope you are too.

Give what you can tonight: http://action.petersformichigan.com/ImWithGary

Thanks.

Gary

Hillary was onstage at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville this evening to support Alison Lundergan Grimes in her campaign to unseat Mitch McConnell in the Senate. Livestream video here >>>>

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Hillary saw the need to incorporate technology in diplomacy early on and begins this chapter at TechCamp Vilnius,  the third of these training camps her State Department had held by  June 2011.  It consisted of two days of eleven-hour sessions devoted to showing how pro-democracy activists could circumvent government opposition tactics thwarting their organizing efforts.

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at TechCamp Vilnius

Hillary first referred to what she came to call 21st century statecraft in two commencement addresses in New York in May 2009 and rapidly followed those with a Youtube on the subject.

2009 Remarks at the New York University Commencement Ceremony

Hillary at Barnard Today

When I graduated from college, diplomacy was mainly conducted by experts behind closed doors. They were primarily men. And very little of what they did was really visible to the rest of us. Today, diplomacy is no longer confined to the State Department or to diplomats in pin-striped suits. In this global age, we are engaging in 21st century statecraft, and it is carried out beyond the halls of government – in barrios and rural villages, in corporate boardrooms and halls of government as well, but also church basements, hospitals, union halls, civic and cultural centers, and even in the dorms and classrooms of colleges like this. The diplomacy of this age is fueled by personal engagement and interpersonal connections. And that’s where all of you come in. With new tools and technologies and with the first-rate education you’ve received, you now have the capacity to influence events in ways that no previous generation ever has… …with these social networking tools that you use every day to tell people you’ve gone to get a latte or you’re going to be running late, you can unite your friends through Facebook to fight human trafficking or child marriage, like the two recent college graduates in Colombia – the country – who organized 14 million people into the largest anti-terrorism demonstration in history, doing as much damage to the FARC terrorist network in a few weeks than had been done in years of military action. (Applause.) And you can organize through Twitter, like the undergraduates at Northwestern who launched a global fast to bring attention to Iran’s imprisonment of an American journalist. And we have two young women journalists right now in prison in North Korea, and you can get busy on the internet and let the North Koreans know that we find that absolutely unacceptable. (Applause.) These new tools are available for everyone. They are democratizing diplomacy. So over the next year, we will be creating Virtual Student Foreign Service Internships to partner American students with our embassies abroad to conduct digital diplomacy. And you can learn more about this initiative on the State Department website.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks at the commencement for Barnard College, in New York

Fully aware of the darker uses of technology,  she explains that the idea was to use mobile technology and social media to promote American values and interests, and to help civil society across the globe hold governments accountable, document abuses, and empower marginalized groups. Hillary reviews technology abuses by some governments such as shutting down the internet in times of upheaval as well as uses made by civil society during such periods – among them those recounted here in relation to the chapter on Iran.

Technology was integral to her Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR).

Hillary Clinton Announces Unprecedented QDDR at a Town Hall at the State Department

Hillary Clinton Announces QDDR at a Town Hall at USAID

State Department Launches “Opinion Space”

Video: Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review Townhall

Video: Secretary Clinton’s QDDR Town Hall at USAID

The Wikileaks publication of confidential documents and emails in 2010 precipitated a diplomatic firestorm that required what came to be called Hillary’s “charm offensive.”  Some world leaders took things in stride.  Others needed her personal reassurance.

Hillary Calling!

Upcoming: On Hillary Clinton’s Agenda

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks to the Press on the Release of Confidential Documents

The United States strongly condemns the illegal disclosure of classified information. It puts people’s lives in danger, threatens our national security, and undermines our efforts to work with other countries to solve shared problems. This Administration is advancing a robust foreign policy that is focused on advancing America’s national interests and leading the world in solving the most complex challenges of our time, from fixing the global economy, to thwarting international terrorism, to stopping the spread of catastrophic weapons, to advancing human rights and universal values. In every country and in every region of the world, we are working with partners to pursue these aims. So let’s be clear: this disclosure is not just an attack on America’s foreign policy interests. It is an attack on the international community – the alliances and partnerships, the conversations and negotiations, that safeguard global security and advance economic prosperity… Now, I am aware that some may mistakenly applaud those responsible, so I want to set the record straight: There is nothing laudable about endangering innocent people, and there is nothing brave about sabotaging the peaceful relations between nations on which our common security depends. There have been examples in history in which official conduct has been made public in the name of exposing wrongdoings or misdeeds. This is not one of those cases. In contrast, what is being put on display in this cache of documents is the fact that American diplomats are doing the work we expect them to do. They are helping identify and prevent conflicts before they start. They are working hard every day to solve serious practical problems – to secure dangerous materials, to fight international crime, to assist human rights defenders, to restore our alliances, to ensure global economic stability. This is the role that America plays in the world. This is the role our diplomats play in serving America. And it should make every one of us proud.

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks Before Bilaterals

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at OSCE Intervention

When The Going Gets Tough, The Tough Get Charming Slideshow: Hillary Clinton Among The “Dissed”

  You may recall that in chapter 16 about Libya Hillary mentions having had to recall former ambassador Gene Cretz because of credible threats against him.  These she lays at the feet of Manning, Assange, and Wikileaks.

Video & Text: Hillary Clinton’s Policy Speech on Internet Freedom *Updated 01.23.2010 with Chinese Translation of Text*

We stand for a single internet where all of humanity has equal access to knowledge and ideas. And we recognize that the world’s information infrastructure will become what we and others make of it. Now, this challenge may be new, but our responsibility to help ensure the free exchange of ideas goes back to the birth of our republic. The words of the First Amendment to our Constitution are carved in 50 tons of Tennessee marble on the front of this building. And every generation of Americans has worked to protect the values etched in that stone. Franklin Roosevelt built on these ideas when he delivered his Four Freedoms speech in 1941. Now, at the time, Americans faced a cavalcade of crises and a crisis of confidence. But the vision of a world in which all people enjoyed freedom of expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear transcended the troubles of his day. And years later, one of my heroes, Eleanor Roosevelt, worked to have these principles adopted as a cornerstone of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights… As I speak to you today, government censors somewhere are working furiously to erase my words from the records of history…*

Some countries have erected electronic barriers that prevent their people from accessing portions of the world’s networks.  They’ve expunged words, names, and phrases from search engine results. They have violated the privacy of citizens who engage in non-violent political speech. These actions contravene the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, which tells us that all people have the right “to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”**

We’ll leave it here, with this speech, as Hillary does, knowing that every day, and probably especially again today as I post that link, people in countries where indeed authorities have tried to *erase her words” and **”erected electronic barriers” will find the words here even though they may be unable to access te State Department site. __________________________________________________________

Hillary Clinton’s ‘Hard Choices’ Retrospective: Introduction

Access other chapters of this retrospective here >>>>

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