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If you like the message you are hearing from Hillary Clinton,  now is a good time to show her you support her candidacy.  There are three important ways you can help.

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1.  You can VOLUNTEER.  Grassroots organizing is heating up at local levels.  Getting your name on a local list will ensure that you are part of the push when your assistance is needed.  Click here to go sign up!

VOLUNTEER2.  You can DONATE.  Here’s why today is a good day for this.  Chip in what you can before Tuesday.

 

If you want to know the state of the race and where we stand, ignore the polls and talking heads on the news.

The true measurement of our campaign’s strength is the number of people who step up and chip in before the June 30th federal fundraising deadline. We need 50,000 donations before then — will you chip in $7 to help us get there?

Let me break this down: After the deadline, we file a report with the Federal Election Commission (also known as the FEC) detailing what we’ve raised, who we’ve raised it from, and where we spend it.

That’s the official record of the breadth and depth of this grassroots campaign. I can guarantee our opponents will be paying attention to it.

FEC quarterly fundraising deadlines are like our final exams for the quarter — and the report we file determines our grade. We get an “A” if we can show that this campaign has an incredible army of grassroots supporters who care enough to make an investment in the race.

And we get an “F” if folks like you sit on the sidelines instead of putting some skin in the game.

Don’t let this first report go public without making an impact. Chip in $7 before June 30th:

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/deadline/

Robby

Robby Mook
Campaign Manager
Hillary for America

donate

3.  You can be a part of her presence on social media.  LIKE HER ON FACEBOOK!  It’s a great way to keep up with her campaign and to find like-minded friends!   Lets’ make history!

Hillary is our champion.  She has always been for us.  Let’s be there for her!

“The Supreme Court has done its work. Now, we have to do ours.”

Saturday, June 27, 2015

In a speech to the Virginia Democrats Jefferson-Jackson Dinner in Fairfax on Friday, June 26th, Hillary called for America to move forward and laid out her vision for the future.

Thank you. Boy, thank you all so much.

Thank you. Hello, Virginia!

I love your governor and I love your first lady, and I am so thrilled to be here with you on such a historic day for our country, a day when we reaffirmed the principle first set down more than two centuries ago by a wise Virginian, that every one of us is created equal.

I’m delighted to be here with so many friends. I had a chance to visit with your two great Democratic senators. Both Senator Warner and Senator Kaine are doing such an extraordinary job in the Senate representing you.

And, of course for me it’s a special treat to be here with the tremendous, unbelievable, beyond description—I’m running out of superlatives—governor, who has been a friend and a colleague to me.

You know, they say Virginia is for lovers. Well, I’m not sure anyone loves this Commonwealth and all of you more than Terry McAuliffe. He may have the biggest heart and the most open mind of anyone you’ll ever meet.

Except, of course, for your First Lady. There are not many people who can leave Terry speechless, but Dorothy does it every time she walks in the room. And I happen to know a thing or two about what it takes to be First Lady of a state, and I have to say Dorothy is in a class by herself.

Now, we’ve always known Terry could talk the talk, but as Governor he’s proving every day he can also walk the walk.

Tens of thousands of new jobs, billions in new capital investment, exports surging, a stronger, more diversified Virginia economy, that’s what your Democratic governor, Terry McAuliffe, is delivering.

And he’s my kind of leader, a pragmatic progressive. He understands that success should be measured by how many families get ahead and stay ahead, not by how big the bonuses are for the wealthiest Americans.

So he’s making the investments Virginia needs in education and transportation, and he’s taking care of our veterans. He is working to expand pre-school for Virginia’s children. He is defeating efforts to close women’s health centers across the commonwealth. And, from his first day in office, he’s been a champion for marriage equality.

And through it all, Terry has exemplified the “Virginia Way.”  He always prefers common ground to scorched earth. He knows that we Americans may differ, bicker, stumble and fall, but we are at our best when we pick each other up, when we have each other’s back.

Today was one of those days when we’re reminded that, like any family, our American family is strongest when we cherish what unites us, and fight back against those who would divide us.

It was an emotional rollercoaster of a day. This morning, love triumphed in the highest court in the land. Equality triumphed. America triumphed.

Just listen to the final lines of the Supreme Court’s decision, because they have resonated with so many people across our country. And this is what that decision said:

“No union is more profound than a marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. Two people become something greater than once they were, a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law, and the Constitution grants them that right.”

And to that I say: Amen. Thank you.

You know, like so many others, my personal views have been shaped over time by people I have known and loved. As a mother and now a grandmother, I remember the joy and pride I felt watching my daughter marry the love of her life. How could we deny that opportunity to anyone’s son or daughter solely on the basis of who they are and who they love? Today’s decision confirms we’ve been working toward equality as a nation step by step, state by state, case by case, court by court, and that equality has been right there in the Constitution all along. There’s something quite remarkable about that.

Like the case here in Virginia that struck down bans on interracial marriage 48 years ago, today was not about discovering new rights. It was about getting closer to the ideals that have defined our nation from the very beginning. I took comfort in that truth this afternoon in Charleston, South Carolina, as I joined President Obama and Mrs. Obama and many others in honoring the life and legacy of Reverend Pinckney and the other eight men and women murdered for the color of their skin.

Our ideals persevere through every storm if we honor and defend them.

America is a gift, but it’s a gift that must be earned by every generation.

And make no mistake, there are always forces pushing in the opposite direction, to deny rights rather than defend or expand them, to constrict the circle of opportunity and equality rather than expand it, to lash out in hate and fear rather than embrace in love and hope.

Now, I know it’s tempting to dismiss a terrible tragedy like Charleston as an isolated incident, to believe that in today’s America, bigotry is largely behind us.

But despite our best efforts and our highest hopes, America’s long struggle with racism is far from finished.

And let’s be honest—let’s be honest, despite today’s ruling, our struggle to end LGBT discrimination is also far from finished. That’s because fear and hatred are far from finished.

And so, our march goes on, America’s march toward that more perfect union, toward equality, toward dignity, toward justice, toward a brighter future for all Americans.

The Supreme Court has done its work. Now, we have to do ours.

Now, I’m going to talk a little politics here—not just because we’re at a political event, and not just because I’m running for president. But because politics is about the choices we make not only about our leaders, but about how we govern ourselves.

Over the past weeks, we’ve seen many moving displays of leadership that have really exemplified our country at our best. The President stirred us with his words, both before and especially today as he spoke at the funeral.

Governors like Nikki Haley and Terry McAuliffe made us proud by removing the Confederate flag from statehouses and license plates.

Mayors and pastors and community leaders came together in unity, Democrats and Republicans alike.

But we also saw the opposite from too many, even including many of the Republican candidates for president, who seemed determined to lead us right back into the past.

This morning, they all decried the Supreme Court’s ruling upholding marriage equality. We even heard them call for a Constitutional amendment to strip away the right to marry from our gay brothers and sisters, strip away “equal dignity in the eyes of the law.”

Instead of trying to turn back the clock, they should be joining us in saying loudly and clearly: No to discrimination once and for all.

I am asking them, please, don’t make the rights, the hopes of any American into a political football for this 2016 campaign. LGBT Americans should be free not just to marry but to live, learn, and work just like everybody else.

Sadly, before the funerals of the nine murdered churchgoing, faithful men and women were even finished, some Republicans in Congress voted to stop the Centers for Disease Control from studying gun violence.

How can you watch massacre after massacre and take that vote? That is wrong. It puts our people at risk. And I for one am never going to stop fighting for a better, safer, smarter approach to get the gun violence in this country under control.

I believe, as the President said today in Charleston, a majority of Americans and a majority of gun owners support commonsense reforms. Let us join together.

There’s so much for us to do. We have a long agenda in front of us. And we need to show respect for one another. We need to call out derogatory language, insults, personal attacks, wherever they occur. There is enough for us to debate without going there.

Recently, a Republican candidate for president described immigrants as drug dealers, rapists, and criminals. Maybe he’s never met them. Maybe he’s never stopped to ask the millions of people who love this country, work hard and want nothing more than a chance to build a better life for themselves and their children, what their lives are like?

Now, these are not the only problems. We need to condemn divisive rhetoric, but we also need to make sure that people are looking at the real problems of our country.

A lot of Republicans may talk about having new ideas and fresh faces, but across the board they’re the party of the past, not the future.

And when you ask them, what are your new ideas on the economy, well, you guessed it: more tax cuts for the very wealthy and fewer rules for Wall Street.

Now, if that sounds familiar, it’s because those are exactly the same top-down economic policies that failed us before. Americans have come too far to see our progress ripped away.

Ask many of these candidates about climate change, one of the defining threats of our time, and they’ll say: “I’m not a scientist.” Well, then why don’t they start listening to those who are scientists?

Ask them about women’s reproductive health, they’re likely to talk about defunding Planned Parenthood. Or maybe they’ll insist on forcing women to undergo some demeaning and invasive medical procedure, as was attempted right here in Virginia.

Well, one thing’s for certain, we don’t need any more leaders who shame and blame women rather than respect our right to make our own reproductive health decisions.

And then there’s the Affordable Care Act. All the Republican candidates were furious that earlier this week the Supreme Court once again confirmed what we’ve all known and believed for years:  It is settled law and it is here to stay.

That means health insurance for 16 million Americans and more than 335,000 Virginians is here to stay.

That means millions of young people are able to stay on their parents’ plans. It means hundreds of billions of dollars in budget savings are here to stay. And yes, you heard that right, because contrary to all the fearmongering, this law, the Affordable Care Act, does not grow the deficit, it shrinks the deficit.

And you know what’s gone for good? Insurance companies discriminating against people with preexisting conditions or charging women more for the same coverage.

Now, the Republicans have already forced more than 50 votes in Congress to repeal or dismantle this law, all without offering a viable alternative. Yet, even after two Supreme Court verdicts and a presidential election, they’re still fighting to take us backwards.

I think we can sum up the message from the Court and the American people in just two words: Move On.

We still have work to do. There’s more to do to protect patients from high drug costs and insurance company abuses, to simplify and streamline, to ease burdens on small businesses, to lower out-of-pocket costs for families.

And Governor McAuliffe is right, it is time, it is past time to expand Medicaid right here in Virginia. That would provide coverage to hundreds of thousands of Virginians who need it, it would create or support tens of thousands of jobs, and it would potentially save about $100 million in the state budget.

So it’s time to drop the excuses, drop the obstruction, and get the job done for Virginia families, for hardworking men and women.

It’s time to turn the page on failed Republican policies in Washington and Richmond and across our country so that we can together focus on the future.

Look across this commonwealth, you see so much that’s working, so much to build on.  After the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, Virginians across this commonwealth are making a new beginning for themselves.

And I know what you did. You worked extra shifts, you took second jobs, you postponed those home repairs—you figured out how to make it work.

We’re standing again. But we all know we’re not yet running the way America should.

And you the record profits of corporations and the record pay of some CEOs, but too many paychecks have barely budged.

The question is: When does your hard work pay off?

When does your family get ahead?

Now. Now. You brought our country back, and it is your time.

And, you know what? America succeeds when you succeed.

I’m running for president to make our economy and our country work for you and for every American.

I will go to bat for the successful and the struggling, for the innovators and the inventors, for the factory workers and food servers who stand on their feet all day, for the nurses who work the night shift, for the truckers who drive for hours, for the farmers who feed us, for the veterans who served our country, for the small business owners who took a risk, for the gay couple who love each other, for the black child who still lives in the shadow of discrimination, and the Hispanic child who still lives in the shadow of deportation.

Just as Terry said, I’m on the side for everyone who’s ever been knocked down but refused to be knocked out.

I’m not running for some Americans, but for all Americans. I will always stand my ground so you and our country can gain ground.

If you’ll give me the chance, I will wage and win four fights for you, and we’ll do it together. To build that economy for tomorrow, not yesterday. To strengthen America’s families, because when our families are strong, America is strong. To harness all our power, our smarts, and our values to maintain American leadership in the world. And to reform our government and revitalize our democracy so it works for everyday Americans.

Now, to win these fights, our next president will have to work with Congress and every other willing partner across our entire country. I will do just that. I did it before. I worked across the aisle.

It’s not going to be easy. I know as well as anyone how hard this job really is. I have seen it up close and personal.

You know how all our Presidents come into office looking so vigorous? And then we watch their hair grow grayer and grayer.

Well, you won’t see my hair turn white in the White House.

I may not be the youngest candidate in this race, but with your help, I will be the youngest woman president in the history of the United States!

So Virginia—Virginia, let’s work together to make sure this beloved commonwealth is blue, that we have Democrats in the state legislature to work with the governor, and that we do have a Democratic president in the White House in 2017.

Thank you all and God bless you.

06-26-15-Z-13

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton is introduced at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton is introduced at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton responds to the cheers of supporters at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton responds to the cheers of supporters at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stands as she is introduced at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stands as she is introduced at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters after speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters after speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton waves to supporters during a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015.   (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton waves to supporters during a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, responds to the cheer of supporters  at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015.   (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, responds to the cheer of supporters at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton walks on the stage with Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, center, at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015.   (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton walks on the stage with Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, center, at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens as Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe introduces her at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015.  REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens as Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe introduces her at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton walks on the stage with Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, left, during a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015.   (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton walks on the stage with Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, left, during a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is introduced by Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is introduced by Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton claps before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton claps before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton walks with Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton walks with Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stands with Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stands with Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe before speaking at the Virginia Democratic Party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinner at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, June 26, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

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donate

VOLUNTEER

 

I have mentioned, more than once,  George Lakoff’s frustration with Democrats for failing to own the framing of issues.  I know a lot of people think he is long-winded (yes, he rants),  and that a linguist has no business commenting on politics.  Actually, in European culture,  traditional linguistic analysis began with the ancient Greeks exactly because they had a democratic political system.  How did you think the candidates figured out which speeches worked best and why?

As I was perusing the newsfeeds, I noticed that articles about this decision are using the term “marriage equality.”  This is the Democratic frame.  It would be easier for Republicans to argue against “gay marriage.”  It is a lot harder for them to “come out” against equality.  :)

The Democrats own this one.  We finally won the framing contest!  George Lakoff, this Bud’s for you!

Hillary takes the wheel and drives this one … all the way to 1600 in ’16.

 

A proud day.

 

 

donate

VOLUNTEER

 

It was so huge that it had to be held in an arena rather than in the nearby Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church where the massacre occurred.  Thousands filled the TD Arena as well as the streets around it.  The service was beautiful.

President Obama delivered the eulogy … but it was  so much more than that.  Somehow, it seemed to be the speech everyone has been waiting for over so many years.  Maybe it was a matter of this being the right place, time, and mood.

After the service, the many dignitaries were not whisked away hastily, but stayed around to offer their support to the families and friends.

In case you missed it >>>>>C-SPAN>>>>>>>>>>

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton talks with mourners after funeral services for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney was one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Chruch. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton talks with mourners after funeral services for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney was one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Chruch. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

President Barack Obama embraces Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as he leaves services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, at the College of Charleston TD Arena in Charleston, S.C. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

President Barack Obama embraces Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as he leaves services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, at the College of Charleston TD Arena in Charleston, S.C. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, talks with Gov. Nikki Haley at the funeral service for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, talks with Gov. Nikki Haley at the funeral service for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, embraces Gov. Nikki Haley at the funeral service for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, embraces Gov. Nikki Haley at the funeral service for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley  (L) hugs U.S. Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton Clinton after funeral services for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston, South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney was one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Chruch. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley
(L) hugs U.S. Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton Clinton after funeral services for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston, South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney was one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Chruch. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., left, talks with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, at the funeral service for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., left, talks with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, at the funeral service for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) talks with first lady Michelle Obama and President Barack Obama after the conclusion of funeral services for Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston, South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney was one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.   REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) talks with first lady Michelle Obama and President Barack Obama after the conclusion of funeral services for Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston, South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney was one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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President Barack Obama looks to Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as he and first lady Michelle Obama leave services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, at the College of Charleston TD Arena, in Charleston, S.C.. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

President Barack Obama looks to Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as he and first lady Michelle Obama leave services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, at the College of Charleston TD Arena, in Charleston, S.C.. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

U.S. President Barack Obama hugs Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton after  funeral services for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston, South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney is one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.   REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. President Barack Obama hugs Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton after
funeral services for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston, South Carolina June 26, 2015. Pinckney is one of nine victims of a mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

President Barack Obama looks to Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as he and first lady Michelle Obama leave services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, at the College of Charleston TD Arena, in Charleston, S.C.. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

President Barack Obama looks to Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as he and first lady Michelle Obama leave services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, at the College of Charleston TD Arena, in Charleston, S.C.. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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Proud.

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Our new favorite map. RT if you live in a state where marriage equality is law.

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Our hearts are full for Dave, Dan, and Jaylah, and loving families in all 50 states.

Proud to celebrate a historic victory for marriage equality—& the courage & determination of LGBT Americans who made it possible. -H

2016_Campaign_logo

Today is one of those days we’ll tell our grandchildren about. Marriage equality is now the law in all 50 states.

From Stonewall to today’s decision, the courage and determination of the LGBT community has changed hearts, minds, and laws. Generations of advocates and activists sacrificed so much for this victory.

This is our country at its best: inclusive, open, and striving towards true equality.

But the struggle for LGBT rights doesn’t end with this triumph. Our work is not finished until every American can not only marry, but live, work, pray, learn, and raise a family free from discrimination and prejudice.

I will never stop fighting for every American who needs a champion. Are you with me?

Add your name to celebrate history:

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/history/

Thank you,

Hillary

 

Statement from Hillary Clinton on the Supreme Court Decision on Marriage Equality

Hillary Clinton released the following statement after the Supreme Court decision on Marriage Equality in the Obergefell v. Hodges case.

Along with millions of Americans, I am celebrating today’s landmark victory for marriage equality, and the generations of advocates and activists who fought to make it possible. From Stonewall to the Supreme Court, the courage and determination of the LGBT community has changed hearts and changed laws.

This ruling is an affirmation of the commitment of couples across the country who love one another. It reflects the will of the vast and growing multitude of Americans who believe that LGBT couples deserve to be recognized under the law and treated equally in the eyes of society.  And it represents our country at its best: inclusive, open, and striving towards true equality.

But we know that the struggle for LGBT rights doesn’t end with today’s triumph. As love and joy flood our streets today, it is hard to imagine how anyone could deny the full protection of our laws to any of our fellow Americans—but there are those who would. So while we celebrate the progress won today, we must stand firm in our conviction to keep moving forward. For too many LGBT Americans who are subjected to discriminatory laws, true equality is still just out of reach. While we celebrate today, our work won’t be finished until every American can not only marry, but live, work, pray, learn and raise a family free from discrimination and prejudice. We cannot settle for anything less.
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While we applaud today’s SCOTUS decision upholding the ACA,  we remember another decision two years ago today permitting states to make unfair revisions to voting laws. Two years ago, President and Secretary Clinton issued this statement.

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Statement by President and Secretary Clinton on today’s Voting Rights Act decision

Jun 25, 2013 | President Clinton | New York, NY  | Statement

We are disappointed in today’s decision striking at the heart of the Voting Rights Act.  For over four decades the Act has succeeded in overcoming unconstitutional barriers to voting, and has demonstrated its central role in protecting this essential freedom.  We strongly urge Congress to put aside partisanship and politics, as it did in 2006, and promptly pass legislation to replace those portions of the Act struck down today.

In August of 2013, upon receiving the ABA Medal, Hillary again addressed the damage wrought by that decision.

Hillary Clinton Receives ABA Medal and Addresses Voting Rights Issues

 

This year, on the anniversary of the 19th Amendment, Hillary once again took aim at the evisceration of the VRA, called for reparation by legislators, and asked “What part of democracy are they afraid of?” 

On the Anniversary of the 19th Amendment Hillary Clinton Hits Back at Republican Voter Suppression

 

She echoed that question two weeks ago in her campaign kick-off speech in New York City.

Hillary Clinton: “What part of democracy are they afraid of?”

June 13, 2015

 

When she said it that day, I repeated it with her.  Hillary supporters should make this a rallying cry across the nation.  Everyone who is eligible to vote should be able to without barriers and obstructions placed in the way.  Everyone’s vote is important.  Every vote counts.  This is an essential part of Hillary’s history,  as she explained in Houston,  of her message,  and of our democracy!  Hillary for America!

 

 

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Stand with Hillary if you’re with her in the fight for affordable health care:

“Now is our chance to beat the odds and give the American people the health security they need.”–Hillary in 1993

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Friend–

This morning, the Supreme Court sided with common sense and America’s families, and confirmed again that the Affordable Care Act is the law of land — and it’s here to stay.

This ruling is a victory for every American, especially the millions whose lives have been improved by health care reform and the countless more who fought hard to pass and protect this law. It’s a reminder that while progress never comes easy, if we keep working, keep pushing, and never, ever give up, anything is possible.

Add your name if you agree that access to health care is a basic human right.

Despite two clear rulings by the highest court in the land, Republicans running for president still want to take basic health security away from millions of Americans.

They’re in lockstep with allies in Congress who have voted more than 50 times to repeal or dismantle the Affordable Care Act without proposing a single viable alternative.

The next president will either protect and expand health care for every American, or undo the progress we’ve made.

If you believe we need to keep fighting, join me:

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/health-care/

Health care reform was a hard-fought battle — congratulations to everyone who played a part in this win.

Thank you,

Hillary

 

Statement from Hillary Clinton on Supreme Court Decision on Affordable Care Act

Hillary Clinton released the following statement after the Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act in the King v. Burwell decision.

I applaud the Supreme Court’s decision to affirm what the authors of the Affordable Care Act clearly intended and wrote into law: that health insurance should be affordable and available in every state across the country.

Republicans in Congress have waged a sustained attack against this promise.  They’ve voted more than 50 times to repeal or dismantle the law, roll back coverage for millions of Americans, and let insurers write their own rules again – all without proposing any viable alternatives.  Now that the Supreme Court has once again re-affirmed the ACA as the law of the land, it’s time for the Republican attacks to end.  It’s time to move on.

The Affordable Care Act isn’t perfect, but the evidence is clear: it’s working. Sixteen million Americans have gained coverage.  Millions of young people are able to stay on their parents’ plans.  Insurance companies can no longer discriminate against people with preexisting conditions or charge women higher rates just because of their gender.

Republicans should stop trying to tear down the law and start working across party lines to build on these successes.

I’ve fought for the promise of quality, affordable health care for every American for decades.  And I’m not going to stop now.  Anyone seeking to lead our country should stand up and support this decision.

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