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Hillary is calling for full equality.  Sign here to support the Equality Act.

The Equality Act will mean full federal equality for LGBT Americans & stronger anti-discrimination protections for everyone. Past time. -H

Add your name if you agree: We need full equality for LGBT Americans. Pass the .

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I just heard Donald Trump say that Hillary Clinton was the “worst secretary of state in the history of our country.”   Apparently he suffers from a linguistic disorder that causes him to make phonemic substitutions.  A phoneme is a meaningful unit of sound.  Phonemic production establishes differences in meaning between words.

There is one phonemic difference between the words /fərst/ {first} and /wərst/ {worst}.  It occurs with the initial consonant.   Mr. Trump’s linguistic slip belies the facts.  In two important instances, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was first.

Six years ago this month, Hillary Clinton announced the first sweeping review of interdepartmental and inter-agency task coordination ever conducted by that department.  The purpose was to improve efficiency and delivery by detecting replications of responsibilities and identifying needed interdepartmental and inter-agency partnerships.  It was monumental, daunting, scary for many at first, but now is an established practice to be conducted every four years.

The Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) Hillary instituted was modeled after the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) conducted regularly by the Department of Defense with which Hillary became familiar during her service on the Senate Armed Services Committee.  I have always thought that had she been elected in 2008 she might well have requested such a review from every department.

To understand the enormity, within the department, of this review, one need only look at the two town hall meetings where she announced this undertaking.  She was the first secretary of state to call for a review of this kind in the history of the department and the country.

Hillary Clinton Announces Unprecedented QDDR at a Town Hall at the State Department

Hillary Clinton Announces QDDR at a Town Hall at USAID

As chief diplomat of the United States, the secretary of state oversees all foreign missions: embassies and consulates.  When the SOS visits foreign states, it is the our ambassador who acts as host, deploying staff to make necessary arrangements and providing needed support of all kinds.  Chiefs of mission get to meet “the boss” during these visits and at times when they are back on home ground if the secretary happens to be in DC at the time.

One thing they had never had a chance to do was to encounter each other in a collegial setting where they could meet and greet their counterparts around the globe and compare notes.  Hillary Clinton was the first secretary of state to convene all chiefs of mission for a conference here at home in the history of the department and the country.

Secretary Clinton Convenes the Inaugural Global Chiefs of Mission Conference: Media Coverage for February 2

These two important firsts left an indelible mark on the department that are historical and ensure continual improvement of departmental functioning and interdepartmental communication and coordination.

Not to be forgotten either is this first.  Hillary established this important post. Some (men) thought Hillary’s advocacy for women was a “soft” issue and not a strong, hard signature effort, but as Hillary continues to highlight on the campaign trail, the plight of a nation rests with the plight of its women.

Hillary Clinton Swears In Melanne Verveer Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues

June 12, 2009

Far from the worst.  Hillary Clinton was the first!

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At Brookland Baptist Church in West Columbia today, Hillary spoke to mayors and local officials.

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton applauds as she is introduced during a campaign event in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton applauds as she is introduced during a campaign event in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton smiles as she is introduced during a campaign event in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton smiles as she is introduced during a campaign event in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C.   Clinton has praised South Carolina leaders for removing the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds.  But the Democratic presidential candidate says that action was only symbolic, and that all people in the country should unite behind the rallying cry — "black lives matter."  (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. Clinton has praised South Carolina leaders for removing the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds. But the Democratic presidential candidate says that action was only symbolic, and that all people in the country should unite behind the rallying cry — “black lives matter.” (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton listens to questions at an event, Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C.   Clinton talked about what she said was a lack of educational and economic opportunities, and a criminal justice system that treats blacks more harshly than whites.  (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton listens to questions at an event, Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. Clinton talked about what she said was a lack of educational and economic opportunities, and a criminal justice system that treats blacks more harshly than whites. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton, Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C.  Clinton talked about what she said was a lack of educational and economic opportunities, and a criminal justice system that treats blacks more harshly than whites.   (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton, Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. Clinton talked about what she said was a lack of educational and economic opportunities, and a criminal justice system that treats blacks more harshly than whites. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C.   Clinton talked about what she said was a lack of educational and economic opportunities, and a criminal justice system that treats blacks more harshly than whites.  (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. Clinton talked about what she said was a lack of educational and economic opportunities, and a criminal justice system that treats blacks more harshly than whites. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stops for a picture with supporters after a campaign stop in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stops for a picture with supporters after a campaign stop in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks as she is surrounded by local mayors in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks as she is surrounded by local mayors in West Columbia, South Carolina July 23, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane

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Later in the day, she visited Greenville Technical College, Greenville to speak about her plans for the economy.

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Hillary stopped off in Detroit yesterday on her way to a fundraiser in Grosse Pointe.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton laughs Tuesday, July 21, 2015 at Sweet Potato Sensations bake shop in Detroit.  Clinton stopped in ahead of a $2,700-a-head fundraiser in the suburbs. (Daniel Mears/Detroit News via AP)  DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT; HUFFINGTON POST OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton laughs Tuesday, July 21, 2015 at Sweet Potato Sensations bake shop in Detroit. Clinton stopped in ahead of a $2,700-a-head fundraiser in the suburbs. (Daniel Mears/Detroit News via AP) DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT; HUFFINGTON POST OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton mades a stop at the popular Sweet Potato Sensations bake shop in Detroit on Tuesday, July 21, 2015.  Clinton stopped in ahead of a $2,700-a-head fundraiser in the suburbs. (Daniel Mears/Detroit News via AP)  DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT; HUFFINGTON POST OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton mades a stop at the popular Sweet Potato Sensations bake shop in Detroit on Tuesday, July 21, 2015. Clinton stopped in ahead of a $2,700-a-head fundraiser in the suburbs. (Daniel Mears/Detroit News via AP) DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT; HUFFINGTON POST OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

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In Arkansas Saturday night,  Hillary Clinton promised to continue to battle for women’s equity in the workplace.

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton vows to "keep fighting for equal pay for equal work" for women. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton vows to “keep fighting for equal pay for equal work” for women. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Taking to Twitter today, she pushed back at remarks by Mitch McConnell and took a position on Dodd-Frank.

If Sen. McConnell thinks fighting for women and families is playing the “gender card”—okay. Here’s our :

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Hillary has also proposed increased profit-sharing.  Americans work hard.  Those who put in the hard work and long hours should experience the benefits of some ownership of the operation in which they labor.  Evidence supports the benefits to the employer of including the employees in the profits.

Profit sharing is just common sense. See Hillary’s plan:

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While we are on the subject of fair pay and workplace equity, this morning, there is this from the Wall Street Journal.

Overtime Rules Send Bosses Scrambling

Rachel Feintzeig, Rachel Emma Silverman, Lauren Weber
Companies are racing to track and manage the hours their employees really work, following a White House proposal that would put millions more U.S. workers in line for overtime pay. The plans, issued last month by the Labor Department, would more than double the salary threshold that determines which workers are eligible for time-and-a-half pay when working more than 40 hours in a week. Those rules won’t be finalized for months, but already companies are seeking ways to comply with the law and keep a lid on labor costs. Some firms are installing software that alerts managers when workers are at risk of running up overtime pay, while others are evaluating which staffers should receive salaries and which should switch to hourly pay. And others may discourage checking email after working hours. Read more >>>>

Wow!  Scrambling!  To pay fairly.  Pathetic!  But employers have been getting away with this for far too long.  The magician’s trick here is putting people on managerial salary (often for a few thousand per year beyond what they were making in the ranks) and then expecting unlimited hours put in at that yearly rate. In a prior position, over 14 years, I worked 13 Saturdays a year.  I was not paid for those Saturdays even at a daily rate the heck with overtime.  I was told it was part of the job description and all of those hours were covered by my yearly salary which ranged from 22K to 26K over those years,  My staffers who worked on those Saturdays, salaried at 18K to 23K  over the same period, were paid time-and-a-half.   I was responsible for all of the work done by my staff and stayed until all the work was finished no matter when others were free to go home – I had to.  The work had to be done. I worked 182 Saturdays over those years for which I was not paid beyond my regular 9-5:30 pay.  I will not even bother with the extra two to five hours I regularly put in Mon. – Fri. beyond regular office hours.  I held no manner of ownership in the organization. I worked as if I did.

It is bad enough that people are cheated on their paychecks with this trick.  I would love a grandfather clause that allowed me to collect those unpaid wages.  The most insidious underbelly to this practice is that those hours and the funds that might have been paid do not count into social security either.   Those are funds that should not only be paid but also should be taxed and appear in your SSI contributions.  It is a double-blind trap for workers, depriving them both of present and future compensation and also cheats the social security system of taxable funds.

If you are a woman in this situation, you have no way to know if your male counterparts do receive the overtime pay.  You suck it up.  If you are a single woman, the assumption is that you have unlimited extra hours to contribute in this way despite hidden responsibilities that nobody cares about such as ill and aging parents and other family members and your own, perhaps invisible, disabilities and personal issues.

Nobody’s time and efforts should be taken for granted.  Work and the profits it engenders should be compensated equitably.  The economy does well when American families do well.  Families do well when all working members are treated with fairness.  Hillary is fighting for all of us.  It is not just a women’s issue.  It is an American issue.  If we want to see change in the workplace, we need to be behind her.

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Hillary took to social media today to respond to questions from voters and to GOP remarks and actions.   She held a live chat on Facebook and sent out a tweet about Scott Walker’s latest legislation in WI.

Hillary Clinton started a Q&A.

Hillary’s hosting her first Facebook Q&A of the campaign this afternoon. She’ll be chatting live about her vision for a better economy—add your question below, and the post will be updated when she’s ready to chat!

Hillary Clinton's photo.

…and that’s why you don’t try to pick a fight on women’s economic security with Hillary Clinton.

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U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton vows to "keep fighting for equal pay for equal work" for women. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton vows to “keep fighting for equal pay for equal work” for women. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

This really matters to me

When Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Frederick Douglass, and 97 other brave women and men signed their names to the Declaration of Sentiments in Seneca Falls 167 years ago today, they sparked a movement that altered the course of history.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident,” they wrote, “that all men and women are created equal.” All men and women — incredible how just two words could change millions of lives.

We cannot forget the heroes who went to jail and even died to give women the right to vote, earn and keep wages, own property, serve in the military, and hold elected office. We owe it to our daughters and granddaughters to continue the march of progress in America and around the world.

I’ve been fighting for these ideals for my entire career — and I want to take that fight all the way to the White House. Will you stand with me?

We must keep fighting for equal pay, especially for women of color, who often lose out the most. We must fight for equal access to good jobs, good health care, and good child care, for the rights of women to make our own reproductive health decisions, and to make sure that every little girl in America can be anything she wants when she grows up — even President of the United States.

The full participation of women and girls in our society is more than an issue of fairness; it’s also a smart way to grow our economy. When women aren’t paid fairly, families lose out on thousands of dollars every year that could go toward paying for groceries or rent, saving for retirement, or sending a child to college. When we fight for equality, we fight for a better future for all of our children.

Sign your name to declare your support for equality and pledge to redouble our efforts to finish the work that began in Seneca Falls:

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/declaration-of-equality/

Thank you,

Hillary

 

167 years ago, pioneers in Seneca Falls began the fight for women’s equality. Add your name:

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167 years ago: The Seneca Falls Convention paved the way for women’s equality. It’s up to us to make it a reality for all. -H

 

The journey toward women’s equality began 167 years ago in Seneca Falls, NY. Today, we must write its future.

Hillary is fighting right beside us. Give her the ammo she needs in the battle. Please donate as you can. Thank you.

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