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One thing that needs to be emphasized given the slant of the stories we are seeing and hearing today is that the hardware was turned over to the Department of Justice, not to the House Select Committee on Benghazi.  There is a big difference.  It is not that she has finally turned over the server and flash drive, as so many are saying (implying that she has relented to the demands of Trey Gowdy & Co.).  She has turned them over to DOJ in a most timely fashion as and when asked, i.e. immediately.  There is a difference between the GOP and the DOJ.

Hillary has not given the hardware to Trey Gowdy (much to his consternation) or to any elected officials.  Republicans have been pursuing a political agenda ever since those on the Select Committee relinquished their appointed task.   Preventing Hillary Clinton from assuming political office is, to them,  of far greater import and urgency than finding the security gaps that need to be closed to prevent another Benghazi.

In simple language that any fifth-grader should be able to understand, Jennifer Palmieri’s email answers pretty much every question you might have about the news that has obsessed the media today.

You might hear some news over the next few days about Hillary Clinton’s emails. Because you are an important part of this team, we wanted to take a few minutes to talk through the facts — we need your help to make sure they get out there.

There’s a lot of misinformation, so bear with us; the truth matters on this.

Here are the basics: Like other Secretaries of State who served before her, Hillary used a personal email address, and the rules of the State Department permitted it. She’s already acknowledged that, in hindsight, it would have been better just to use separate work and personal email accounts. No one disputes that.

The State Department’s request: Last year, as part of a review of its records, the State Department asked the last four former Secretaries of State to provide any work-related emails they had. Hillary was the only former Secretary of State to provide any materials — more than 30,000 emails. In fact, she handed over too many — the Department said it will be returning over 1,200 messages to her because, in their and the National Archives’ judgment, these messages were completely personal in nature.

Hillary didn’t send any classified materials over email: Hillary only used her personal account for unclassified email. No information in her emails was marked classified at the time she sent or received them. She viewed classified materials in hard copy in her office or via other secure means while traveling, not on email.

What makes it complicated: It’s common for information previously considered unclassified to be upgraded to classified before being publicly released. Some emails that weren’t secret at the time she sent or received them might be secret now. And sometimes government agencies disagree about what should be classified, so it isn’t surprising that another agency might want to conduct its own review, even though the State Department has repeatedly confirmed that Hillary’s emails contained no classified information at the time she sent or received them.

To be clear, there is absolutely no criminal inquiry into Hillary’s email or email server. Any and all reports to that effect have been widely debunked. Hillary directed her team to provide her email server and a thumb drive in order to cooperate with the review process and to ensure these materials were stored in a safe and secure manner.

What about the Benghazi committee? While you may hear from the Republican-led Benghazi committee about Hillary’s emails, it is important to remember that the committee was formed to focus on learning lessons from Benghazi to help prevent future tragedies at our embassies and consulates around the globe. Instead, the committee, led by Republican Representative Trey Gowdy, is spending nearly $6 million in taxpayer money to conduct a partisan witch-hunt designed to do political damage to Hillary in the run-up to the election.

Hillary has remained absolutely committed to cooperating. That’s why, just as she gave her email server to the government, she’s also testifying before the Benghazi committee in October and is actively working with the Justice Department to make sure they have what they need. She hopes that her emails will continue to be released in a timely fashion.

It’s worth noting: Many of the Republican candidates for president have done the same things for which they’re now criticizing Hillary. As governor, Jeb Bush owned his own private server and his staff decided which emails he turned over as work-related from his private account. Bobby Jindal went a step further, using private email to communicate with his immediate staff but refusing to release his work-related emails. Scott Walker and Rick Perry had email issues themselves.

The bottom line: Look, this kind of nonsense comes with the territory of running for president. We know it, Hillary knows it, and we expect it to continue from now until Election Day.

It’s okay. We’ll be ready. We have the facts, our principles, and you on our side. And it’s vital that you read and absorb the real story so that you know what to say the next time you hear about this around the dinner table or the water cooler.

Take a look at more details here, including a complete Q&A, and pass them along:

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/email-facts/

Thanks,

Jennifer

Jennifer Palmieri
Communications Director
Hillary for America

Here is the Recommended Reading.  I know a lot of people prefer the quick inoculation of a poster or video.  I also know that serious Hillary loyalists take the time to read, study and prepare.  It is a battle out there.  Be armed with the facts!

Updated: The Facts About Hillary Clinton's Emails

Factsheets

Updated: The Facts About Hillary Clinton’s Emails

We’ve put all of the information about Hillary Clinton’s State Department emails here. Just the facts, all in one place.

Why did Clinton use her own email account?

When Clinton got to the Department, she opted to use her personal email account as a matter of convenience. It enabled her to reach people quickly and keep in regular touch with her family and friends more easily given her travel schedule.

That is the only reason she used her own account.

Her usage was widely known to the over 100 State Department and U.S. government colleagues she emailed, consistent with the practice of prior Secretaries of State and permitted at the time.

As Clinton has said, in hindsight, it would have been better to just have two accounts. While she thought using one account would be easier, obviously, that has not been the case.

Was it allowed?

Yes. The laws, regulations, and State Department policy in place during her tenure permitted her to use a non-government email for work.

The 2009 National Archives regulation in place during her tenure required that “[a]gencies that allow employees to send and receive official electronic mail messages using a system not operated by the agency must ensure that Federal records sent or received on such systems are preserved in the appropriate agency recordkeeping system.” The regulation recognizes the use of non-government email accounts.

As she has stated, Clinton’s practice was to email government officials on their “.gov” accounts, so her work emails were immediately captured and preserved. In fact, more than 90% of those emails should have already been captured in the State Department’s email system before she provided them with paper copies.

A Politifact analysis also confirmed that Clinton’s practices complied with laws and regulations, including support from the former director of a prominent government accountability organization: “In Clinton’s defense, we should note that it was only after Clinton left the State Department, that the National Archives issued a recommendation that government employees should avoid conducting official business on personal emails (though they noted there might be extenuating circumstances such as an emergency that require it). Additionally, in 2014, President Barack Obama signed changes to the Federal Records Act that explicitly said federal officials can only use personal email addresses if they also copy or send the emails to their official account. Because these rules weren’t in effect when Clinton was in office, ‘she was in compliance with the laws and regulations at the time,’ said Gary Bass, founder and former director of OMB Watch, a government accountability organization.”

Clinton said she did not use her email to send or receive classified information, but the State Department and two Inspectors General said some of these emails do contain classified information. Was her statement inaccurate?

Clinton only used her account for unclassified email. No information in Clinton’s emails was marked classified at the time she sent or received them.

When information is reviewed for public release, it is common for information previously unclassified to be upgraded to classified if the State Department or another agency believes its public release could cause potential harm to national security, law enforcement or diplomatic relations.

After reviewing a sampling of the 55,000 pages of emails, the Inspectors General have proffered that a small number of emails, which did not contain any classified markings and/or dissemination controls, should have been classified at the time they were sent. The State Department has said it disagrees with this assessment.

Clinton hopes the State Department and the agencies involved in the review process will sort out as quickly as possible which of the 55,000 pages of emails are appropriate to share with the public.

How did Clinton receive and consume classified information?

The Secretary’s office was located in a secure area. Classified information was viewed in hard copy by Clinton while in the office. While on travel, the State Department had rigorous protocols for her and traveling staff to receive and transmit information of all types.

A separate, closed email system was used by the State Department for the purpose of handling classified communications, which was designed to prevent such information from being transmitted anywhere other than within that system.

Is Department of Justice conducting a criminal inquiry into Clinton’s email use?

No. As the Department of Justice and Inspectors General made clear, the IGs made a security referral. This was not criminal in nature as misreported by some in the press. The Department of Justice is now seeking assurances about the storage of materials related to Clinton’s email account.

Is it true that her email server and a thumb drive were recently turned over to the government? Why?

Again, when information is reviewed for public release, it is common for information previously unclassified to be upgraded to classified if the State Department or another agency believes its public release could cause potential harm to national security, law enforcement or diplomatic relations.

Clinton hopes that State and the other agencies involved in the review process will sort out as quickly as possible which emails are appropriate to share with the public, and that the release will be as timely and as transparent as possible.

When the Department upgraded some of the previously unclassified email to classified, her team worked with the State Department to ensure copies of her emails were stored in a safe and secure manner. She also directed her team to give her server that hosted her email account while she was Secretary to the Department of Justice, as well as a thumb drive containing copies of her emails that already had been provided to the State Department. Clinton has pledged to cooperate with the government’s security inquiry.

Would this issue not have arisen if she used a state.gov email address?

Even if Clinton’s emails had been on a government email address and government device, these questions would be raised prior to public release.

While the State Department’s review of her 55,000 emails brought the issue to the Inspectors Generals’ attentions, the emails that recently were upgraded to classified prior to public release were on the unclassified .gov email system. They were not on the separate, closed system used by State Department for handling classified communications.

Have Clinton’s State Department aides also been asked to provide the Department and Congress with emails from their personal accounts?

We understand that members of her State Department staff were recently asked to assist the Department in its record-keeping by providing any work-related emails they may have on personal accounts. They have received requests from Rep. Gowdy as well.

Clinton is proud of the work of all the dedicated public servants that were part of her team at the State Department. She was proud of her aides then and is proud of them now, as they have committed – as she has – to being as helpful as possible in responding to requests.

Press reports say she used multiple devices – a Blackberry and an iPad – is that true?

Clinton relied on her Blackberry for emailing. This was easiest for her. When the iPad came out in 2010, she was as curious as others and found it great for shopping, browsing, and reading articles when she traveled. She also had access to her email account on her iPad and sometimes used it for that too.

Was she ever provided guidance about her use of a non-“.gov” email account?

The State Department has and did provide guidance regarding the need to preserve federal records. To address these requirements, it was her practice to email government employees on their “.gov” email address. That way, work emails would be immediately captured and preserved in government record-keeping systems.

What did Clinton provide to the State Department?

On December 5, 2014, 30,490 copies of work or potentially work-related emails sent and received by Clinton from March 18, 2009, to February 1, 2013, were provided to the State Department. This totaled roughly 55,000 pages. More than 90% of her work or potentially work-related emails provided to the Department were already in the State Department’s record-keeping system because those e-mails were sent to or received by “state.gov” accounts.

Early in her term, Clinton continued using an att.blackberry.net account that she had used during her Senate service. Given her practice from the beginning of emailing State Department officials on their state.gov accounts, her work-related emails during these initial weeks would have been captured and preserved in the State Department’s record-keeping system. She, however, no longer had access to these emails once she transitioned from this account.

Why did the Select Committee announce that she used multiple email addresses during her tenure?

In fairness to the Committee, this was an honest misunderstanding. Clinton used one email account during her tenure at State (with the exception of her initial weeks in office while transitioning from an email account she had previously used). In March 2013, a month after she left the Department, Gawker published the email address she used while Secretary, and so she had to change the address on her account.

At the time the printed copies were provided to the Department in 2014, because it was the same account, the new email address established after she left office appeared on the printed copies as the sender, and not the address she used as Secretary. In fact, this address on the account did not exist until March 2013. This led to understandable confusion that was cleared up directly with the Committee after its press conference.

Why didn’t Clinton provide her emails to the State Department until December 2014?

In 2014, after recognizing potential gaps in its overall recordkeeping system, the State Department asked for the help of the four previous former Secretaries in meeting the State Department’s obligations under the Federal Records Act.

Clinton responded to this request by providing the State Department with over 55,000 pages of emails. As it was Clinton’s practice to email U.S. government officials on their .gov accounts, the overwhelming majority of these emails should have already been preserved in the State Department’s email system.

In providing these emails to the Department, Clinton included all she had that were even potentially work-related—including emails about using a fax machine or asking for iced tea during a meeting—erring on the side of over-inclusion, as confirmed by the Department and National Archives’ determination that over 1250 emails were “personal” records (which they have indicated will be returned to her).

After providing her work and potentially work-related emails, she chose not to keep her personal, non-work related emails, which by definition, are not federal records and were not requested by the Department or anyone else.

Why did the State Department ask for assistance in collecting records? Why did the State Department need assistance in further meeting its requirements under the Federal Records Act?

The State Department formally requested the assistance of the four previous former Secretaries in a letter to their representatives dated October 28, 2014, to help in further meeting the Department’s requirements under the Federal Records Act.

The letter stated that in September 2013, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) issued new guidance clarifying records management responsibilities regarding the use of personal email accounts for government business.

While this guidance was issued after all four former Secretaries had departed office, the Department decided to ensure its records were as complete as possible and sought copies of work emails sent or received by the Secretaries on their own accounts.

Why did Clinton decide not to keep her personal emails?

As Clinton has said before, these were private, personal messages, including emails about her daughter’s wedding plans, her mother’s funeral services and condolence notes, as well as emails on family vacations, yoga routines, and other items one would typically find in their own email account, such as offers from retailers, spam, etc.

Did Clinton delete any emails while facing a subpoena?

No. As noted, the emails that Clinton chose not to keep were personal emails—they were not federal records or even work-related—and therefore were not subject to any preservation obligation under the Federal Records Act or any request. Nor would they have been subject to the subpoena—which did not exist at the time—that was issued by the Benghazi Select Committee some three months later.

Rep. Gowdy’s subpoena issued in March 2015 did not seek, and had nothing to do with, her personal, non-work emails nor her server nor the request by State Department last year for her help in their own record-keeping. Indeed in his March 19th letter, Rep. Gowdy expressly stated he was not seeking any emails that were “purely personal in nature.”

In March 2015, when Rep. Gowdy issued a subpoena to Clinton, the State Department had received all of Clinton’s work-related emails in response to their 2014 request, and indeed, had already provided Clinton’s relevant emails to Rep. Gowdy’s committee.

Rep. Gowdy, other Republicans, and some members of the media have seized on a CNN interview with Clinton to question her on this point. Rep. Gowdy has even gone so far as to say Clinton is lying. But he and the others are clearly mistaken.

As Vox reported, “[S]he didn’t lie about the subpoena. … Clinton clearly wasn’t responding to the question of whether she’d ever been subpoenaed by the Benghazi Committee but whether she’d been subpoenaed before she wiped the emails from her server.” Additionally, Factcheck.org said in its analysis, “Clinton’s denial came in response to a question about deleting emails ‘while facing a subpoena,’ and Clinton objected to Keilar’s ‘assumption.’ Clinton’s campaign said that the emails were deleted before she received the subpoena and that was the point Clinton was making.” Politifact added, “Suggesting that Clinton deleted emails while facing a subpoena contradicts what we know about the controversy so far.”

Vox went on to further decry Rep. Gowdy’s reaction, saying, “[T]his one’s a particularly absurd gimmick, even for a committee that is selectively leaking from depositions and documents to justify its existence. If there was a more extreme category of dissembling than ‘pants on fire,’ now would be the time for Politifact to roll it out on the House Republicans.”

Why was the State Department given printed copies?

That is the requirement. The instructions regarding electronic mail in the Foreign Affairs Manual (the Department’s policy manual) require that “until technology allowing archival capabilities for long-term electronic storage and retrieval of email messages is available and installed, those messages warranting preservation as records (for periods longer than current E-mail systems routinely maintain them) must be printed out and filed with related records.” [5 FAM 443.3].

Were any work items deleted in the course of producing the printed copies?

No.

How many emails were in her account? And how many of those were provided to the State Department?

Her email account contained a total of 62,320 sent and received emails from March 2009 to February 2013. Based on the review process described below, 30,490 of these emails were provided to the Department, and the remaining 31,830 were private, personal records.

How and who decided what should be provided to the State Department?

The Federal Records Act puts the obligation on the government official to determine what is and is not a federal record. The State Department Foreign Affairs Manual outlines guidance “designed to help employees determine which of their e-mail messages must be preserved as federal records and which may be deleted without further authorization because they are not Federal record materials.” [5 FAM 443.1(c)].

Following conversations with State Department officials and in response to the State Department’s 2014 letter to former Secretaries, Clinton directed her attorneys to assist by identifying and preserving all emails that could potentially be federal records. This entailed a multi-step process to review each email and provide printed copies of Clinton’s emails to the State Department, erring on the side of including anything that might be even potentially work-related.

A search was conducted on Clinton’s email account for all emails sent and received from 2009 to her last day in office, February 1, 2013.

After this universe was determined, a search was conducted for a “.gov” (not just state.gov) in any address field in an email. This produced over 27,500 emails, representing more than 90% of the 30,490 printed copies that were provided to the State Department.

To help identify any potential non-“.gov” correspondence that should be included, a search of first and last names of more than 100 State Department and other U.S. government officials was performed. This included all Deputy Secretaries, Under Secretaries, Assistant Secretaries, Ambassadors-at-Large, Special Representatives and Envoys, members of the Secretary’s Foreign Policy Advisory Board, and other senior officials to the Secretary, including close aides and staff.

Next, to account for non-obvious or non-recognizable email addresses or misspellings or other idiosyncrasies, the emails were sorted and reviewed both by sender and recipient.

Lastly, a number of terms were specifically searched for, including: “Benghazi” and “Libya.”

These additional three steps yielded just over another 2,900 emails, including emails from former Administration officials and long-time friends that may not be deemed by the State Department to be federal records. And hundreds of these emails actually had already been forwarded onto the state.gov system and captured in real-time.

With respect to materials that the Select Committee has requested, the State Department has stated that just under 300 emails related to Libya were provided by the State Department to the Select Committee in response to a November 2014 letter, which contained a broader request for materials than prior requests from the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Given Clinton’s practice of emailing State Department officials on their state.gov addresses, the State Department already had, and had already provided, the Select Committee with emails from Clinton in August 2014 – prior to requesting and receiving printed copies of her emails.

The review process described above confirmed Clinton’s practice of emailing State Department officials on their .gov address, with the vast majority of the printed copies of work-related emails Clinton provided to the State Department simply duplicating what was already captured in the State Department’s record-keeping system in real time.

Did Clinton use this account to communicate with foreign officials?

During her time at State, she communicated with foreign officials in person, through correspondence, and by telephone. The review of all of her emails revealed only one email with a foreign (UK) official.

Did she withhold any work emails? What about the 15 emails that Sid Blumenthal provided to the Select Committee that she did not provide to the State Department?

She provided the State Department with all work and potentially work-related emails that she had, including all of her correspondence with Sid Blumenthal. We understand that Mr. Blumenthal had some emails that Clinton did not have, and Clinton had some emails that Mr. Blumenthal did not have, but it is important to note that none of those emails provide any new insights on the attack on our facilities in Benghazi.

Do you think a third party should have been allowed to review what was turned over to the State Department, as well as the remainder that was not?

The Federal Records Act puts the obligation on the government official, not the agency or a third party, to determine what is and is not a federal record. The State Department Foreign Affairs Manual outlines guidance “designed to help employees determine which of their e-mail messages must be preserved as federal records and which may be deleted without further authorization because they are not Federal record materials.” [5 FAM 443.1(c)].

Clinton responded to the State Department’s request by providing approximately 55,000 pages of her work and potentially work-related emails. She has also taken the unprecedented step of asking that those emails be made public. In doing so, she has sought to support the State Department’s efforts, fulfill her responsibility of record-keeping, and provide the chance for the public to assess the work she and officials at the State Department did during her tenure.

After her work-related emails were identified and preserved, Clinton chose not to keep her private, personal emails that were not federal records, including emails about her daughter’s wedding plans, her mother’s funeral service, family vacations, etc.

Government officials are granted the privacy of their personal, non-work related emails, including personal emails on .gov accounts. Clinton exercised her privilege to ensure the continued privacy of her personal, non-work related emails.

Can’t she release the emails she provided to the State Department herself?

Because the printed copies of work-related emails she provided to the State Department include federal records of the Department, the Department needs to review these emails before they can be made public. She called for them to be made available as soon as possible, and is glad to see the Department has begun releasing them.

Some of the emails released show Clinton emailed aides at times on their personal, rather than .gov accounts. Was she trying to hide these communications?

As Clinton has said before, it was her practice to email U.S. government officials on their .gov accounts if it was work-related. This is evidenced in the emails released so far. In reviewing her emails in 2014, there was a fraction of emails with work-related information sent to U.S. government officials’ personal accounts, and those were provided to the State Department. The overwhelming majority of her work-related emails were to .gov accounts.

Where was the server for her email located?

The server for her email was physically located on her property, which is protected by U.S. Secret Service.

What level of encryption was employed? Who was the service provider?

The security and integrity of her family’s electronic communications was taken seriously from the onset when it was first set up for President Clinton’s team. While the curiosity about the specifics of this set up is understandable, given what people with ill intentions can do with such information in this day and age, there are concerns about broadcasting specific technical details about past and current practices. Suffice it to say, robust protections were put in place and additional upgrades and techniques employed over time as they became available, including consulting and employing third party experts.

Was the server ever hacked?

No, there is no evidence there was ever a breach.

Was there ever an unauthorized intrusion into her email or did anyone else have access to it?

No.

What was done after her email was exposed in February 2013 after the hacker known as “Guccifer” hacked Sid Blumenthal’s account?

While this was not a breach of Clinton’s account, because her email address was exposed, steps were taken at that time to ensure the security and integrity of her electronic communications, including changing her email address.

Was the State Department able to respond to requests related to FOIA or Congressional requests before they received printed copies of her work-related emails?

Yes. As the Select Committee has said, the State Department provided the Committee with relevant emails it already had on the state.gov system before the State Department requested any printed copies from former Secretaries, and four months before the State Department received the printed copies.

For example, in the well-publicized hack of Sid Blumenthal’s email account, a note he sent Clinton on September 12, 2012, was posted online. At first blush, one might not think this exchange would be captured on the state.gov system. But in fact, Clinton forwarded the email, that very same day, onto the state.gov system. And the email was produced by the State Department to the Select Committee, and acknowledged by the Select Committee, in August 2014.

This example illustrates: 1) when an email from a non-“.gov” sender had some connection to work or might add to the understanding of State Department officials, it was Clinton’s practice to forward it to officials at their “state.gov” address; and 2) the State Department was able to search and produce Clinton’s emails when needed long before, and unrelated to, receiving the printed copies as they were already captured on state.gov accounts.

See more…. Say more >>>>>

Hillary Clinton has complied with every reasonable request, is cooperating fully, and has nothing to hide from her government, Trey Gowdy, or the American people.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton answers reporters questions about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump after announcing her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the high school in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton answers reporters questions about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump after announcing her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the high school in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

 

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder donate VOLUNTEER

At a Town Hall at River Valley Community College in Claremont,  Hillary continued unfolding her plan for affordable higher education, the New College Compact.

Access to higher education should be a right, not a privilege for those who can afford it.

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We need to rein in how much higher education costs . It’s time for a new college compact that makes education available to all. -H

A forum on substance abuse in Keene prompted this.

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A heartbreaking number of hands went up when Clinton crowd was asked to raise hands if affected by substance abuse

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton shakes hands during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton shakes hands during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton takes a question during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton takes a question during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives for a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives for a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (2nd L) poses for a photograph with an audience member at a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (2nd L) poses for a photograph with an audience member at a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets audience members at a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets audience members at a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton holds a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton holds a campaign town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with voters during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont,NH (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with voters during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont,NH (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton poses for a photo during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton poses for a photo during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to voters during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to voters during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton meets voters during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton meets voters during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton responds to a question from the audience during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton responds to a question from the audience during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) listens as Jose Montero (C) speaks during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) listens as Jose Montero (C) speaks during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a question from the audience during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

An audience member takes a photograph with a mobile phone as U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum about substance abuse in Keene, New Hampshire August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

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Following her Town Hall in Exeter where she unveiled her New College Compact, Hillary was off to Manchester to rally supporters.  It was handshakes, high fives, and pics and selfies all around.

 

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire August 10, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton high-fives a supporter at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton high-fives a supporter at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a photograph with Mary McDermott, who is wearing a "Hillary 2016" t-shirt, at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a photograph with Mary McDermott, who is wearing a “Hillary 2016” t-shirt, at a campaign stop in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

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During this campaign, I’ve been talking a lot about what I see as the central economic challenge of our time: raising incomes so hardworking families can afford a middle-class life.

I believe one of the single biggest ways we can raise incomes is by making college affordable and available to every American. So today, I’m laying out a plan to do just that.

Hillary’s dad Hugh, center, at Penn State.

For millions of Americans, a college degree has been the ticket to a better life. My grandfather worked his entire life in a lace mill, but my dad made it to college. He was able to start his own small business, and that made a huge difference in our lives. Then my parents saved for years so they could send me to a school across the country. They knew that they were setting me on the path to a better future.

College still holds that promise. A lot has changed in this country — but that hasn’t.

Parents who never had the chance to go to college themselves dream of seeing their kids get that degree, from the moment they’re born. High-schoolers — even middle-schoolers — are taking college prep courses and studying for the SAT. Full-time workers are taking courses online, even if that means heading straight from an eight-hour shift to a pile of homework. If that’s what it takes to get a better job — to give their kids better than they had — then they’ll do it.

But here’s the problem. States are slashing education budgets. Colleges keep raising prices. In-state tuition and fees for public colleges increased by 42 percent between 2004 and 2014. But incomes didn’t rise by that much. So families are left facing a painful choice. Either they say, “We just can’t afford it,” and pass up on all the opportunities that a degree offers — or they do whatever it takes to pay for it, even if that means going deeply into debt.

Now, for most people, the return on investment of a college degree is still worth it. On average, people with four-year degrees earn over half a million dollars more over their careers than people with high school degrees.

But student debt is increasingly holding people back. Forty million Americans have student loans. Together, they owe more than a trillion dollars. And millions of Americans are delinquent or in default. Even if they do everything they can to pay their loans, they just can’t keep up.

The cost of this debt is real — not just on balance sheets, but in people’s lives and futures. I’ve talked to people who have so much student debt, they’ve put off buying a house, changing jobs, starting a business — even getting married. I’ve met parents and grandparents who’ve co-signed loans and end up draining their savings or ruining their credit — all because they did what parents and grandparents are supposed to do: help out the next generation.

There are students who take out loans to pay for an expensive degree from a for-profit institution — only to find little support once they actually enroll, or they graduate and discover that, when it comes to finding a job, their degree isn’t worth what they thought.

Then there are the students who start college but never finish. They’re left with debt and no degree to show for it — the worst of both worlds. Over 40 percent of college students still haven’t graduated after six years — and many never do. It’s time to show some tough love to colleges and universities that let significant numbers of students fall behind and drop out, year after year.

Here’s the bottom line: College is supposed to help people achieve their dreams. But more and more, paying for college is actually pushing people’s dreams further out of reach. And that’s just wrong. It’s a betrayal of everything college is supposed to represent — and everything families have worked so hard to achieve.

This is also about America creating the greatest workforce in the world in this century — just like we did in the last. The rest of the world is working as hard as they can to out-do us. China plans to double the number of students enrolled in college by 2030, which means they’ll have nearly 200 million college graduates. That’s more than our entire workforce. American workers can out-work and out-innovate anyone in the world. They deserve training and education that will help them do it.

So we need to make some big changes. We need to transform how much higher education costs — and how those costs get paid. For too long, families have been left to bear the burden of crushing costs, underinvestment, and too little accountability.

It’s time for a new college compact, where everyone does their part. We need to make a quality education affordable and available to everyone willing to work for it — without saddling them with decades of debt.

I’ve been traveling the country for months, talking to students and families, educators, legislators, and experts of every stripe — including young progressive activists who’ve put the issue of debt-free college and affordability at the top of the national agenda.

And today, I’m announcing my plan to put college within reach for everyone. We’re calling it the New College Compact. Here are the basics:

  • Under the New College Compact, no student should have to borrow to pay tuition at a public college.
  • Schools will have to control their costs and show more accountability to their students.
  • States will have to meet their obligation to invest in higher education.
  • The federal government will increase its investment in education, and won’t profit off student loans.
  • And millions with student debt will be able to refinance it at lower rates.

That’s my plan. It’s ambitious — and we should be ambitious. But it’s also achievable. And it would make a big difference in people’s lives.

The New College Compact comes down to two big goals.

First, we’ll make sure that cost won’t be a barrier.

Under my plan, tuition will be affordable for every family. Students should never have to take out a loan to pay for tuition at their state’s public university. We’ll make sure the federal government and the states step up to help pay the cost, so the burden doesn’t fall on families alone.

Of course, these days, tuition isn’t enough. The cost of living at college has also been creeping up. So under my plan, students who qualify for Pell Grants will be able to use them for living expenses — and middle-class students will get more help to cover their living expenses, too.

We’re also going to make community college free. That’s President Obama’s plan and we’re making it ours. If students start at a community college and transfer to a four-year school, we’ll make sure their credits count and their transition is seamless. And we want more community colleges to offer two-year degrees and certificate programs that are valued by employers — so students know that, if they do the work, they’re in good shape to get a good job.

We’re going to work closely with Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Hispanic-Serving Institutions, because they serve some of America’s brightest students, who need the most support and too often have gotten the least of it.

We’ll offer special help to college students who are parents, because when you help parents get an education, you’re helping their kids, too.

And we’ll make a promise to students who perform national service. If you’re willing to spend years tutoring America’s kids or cleaning up our parks or helping communities hit by disasters, we’ll guarantee that you can attend your public university or college debt-free.

So that’s the first big goal. Here’s the second: We’ll make sure that debt won’t hold anyone back.

For the millions of Americans who already have student debt, my plan will give you the chance to refinance at lower interest rates. If you can refinance your mortgage or your car loan, you should be able to refinance your student loan. It’s just wrong that people are locked into college loans at 8, 9, even 10 percent.

If you do end up taking out a loan — for example, to go to a private college — we’ll cut your interest rates, so the government never makes a profit off your loan.

We’ll make it easier to enroll in income-based repayment programs, so you’ll never have to pay more than 10 percent of what you make — and your debt will only last for a fixed period of time. It won’t hang over your head forever.

We’re going to help borrowers who are in default get back on their feet.

We’re going to make sure colleges and universities have more skin in the game. If they load students up with debt for programs that don’t lead to good-paying jobs, it shouldn’t just be the students and taxpayers left holding the bag. Colleges deserve some of the responsibility, too.

And we’ll crack down on predatory schools, lenders and bill collectors. If you defraud students, overcharge veterans, or mislead borrowers, we’re going to do everything we can to stop you.

There’s a lot more in my New College Compact — from strengthening the G.I. Bill, so more veterans can get their degree, to making sure that colleges spend federal dollars on things that benefit students, like teaching and research — not marketing campaigns or big salaries for administrators.

And we’re going to do a lot to encourage innovation. Here’s one example. Workers are increasingly rebooting their careers through online programs — yet many students can’t use federal student aid to pay for them. If earning online badges, specializations, or nano-degrees helps people improve their job prospects, we should be making that option easier and more affordable. Under my plan, more students will be allowed to use student aid to pay for high-quality programs. And we’ll make sure that rules about accreditation don’t keep out promising online education companies. We want to keep quality high — without stifling innovation.

Now, the reason I call this a College Compact is because it goes both ways. Everyone’s going to have to step up to the plate. We can’t fix the problem of rising costs and rising debt just by throwing more money at the problem. We can’t expect the federal government to just pay the bill for free. That’s not how America works. States will have to start investing in education again. Colleges will have to do better by their students. And Americans will have to work hard to put themselves through school, and to out-learn and out-hustle our competitors — just like we always have.

An education shouldn’t be something just for those at the top. And it shouldn’t be a burden. An education should be affordable — and available — to everyone.

I remember how proud my parents were when I graduated college. I remember how proud Bill and I were to see Chelsea graduate — I’ll never forget how grown-up she looked that day. And even though my new granddaughter is already growing up faster than I’d like, I can’t wait to see her walk across a stage someday and receive her diploma. And I know that mothers and fathers and grandparents across the country feel the exact same way.

I want every young person in America to have their shot at that moment. I want every hard-working parent out there to get the chance to see his or her child cross a stage — or to cross it themselves. America should be a place where those achievements are possible for anyone who’s willing to work hard to do their part. That’s the country I want to help build — for this generation and all the generations to come.


Stand with Hillary for the New College Compact — add your name.

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 Wife, mom, grandma, women+kids advocate, FLOTUS, Senator, SecState, hair icon, pantsuit aficionado, 2016 presidential candidate.

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Hillary Clinton's New College Compact

Factsheets

Hillary Clinton’s New College Compact

Costs won’t be a barrier. Debt won’t hold you back.

Imagine what is possible in America if we tackle the runaway costs of higher education, make sure that students who start college can finish with a degree, and relieve the crushing burden of student debt: families that can send their sons and daughters to college, graduates who can buy homes and start businesses without being held back by loans, and student parents who can balance the costs of quality child care with returning to school. We will see incomes rise and ensure Americans get ahead and stay ahead.

Today, Hillary Clinton released a plan to get us there. Her plan is a New College Compact. Students and families are ready to do their part. Everyone else – the federal government, states, and colleges and universities – needs to step up and do theirs.

The bottom line of the New College Compact for every student and every family is this:

Costs won’t be a barrier

  • Students wshould never have to borrow to pay for tuition, books, and fees to attend a 4-year public college in their state under the New College Compact. The additional support they receive will reduce all costs, including living expenses, by thousands of dollars. Students at community college will receive free tuition. Students will have to do their part by contributing their earnings from working 10 hours a week.
  • Families will do their part by making an affordable and realistic family contribution.
  • States will have to step up and meet their obligation to invest in higher education by maintaining current levels of higher education funding and reinvesting over time.
  • The Federal government will make a major new investment in the New College Compact and will never again profit off student loans for college students.
  • Colleges and universities will be accountable to improve their outcomes and control their costs to make sure their tuition is affordable and that students who invest in college leave with a degree.
  • And we will encourage innovators who design imaginative new ways of providing a valuable college education to students – while cracking down on abusive practices that burden students with debt without value.

Debt won’t hold you back

  • If you have student debt, you will be able to refinance your loans at current rates, with an estimated 25 million borrowers receiving debt relief. Typical borrowers could save $2,000 over the life of their loans.
  • For future undergraduates, the plan will significantly cut interest rates so they reflect the government’s low cost of debt. This can save students hundreds or thousands of dollars over the life of their loans.
  • Everyone will be able to enroll in a simplified income based repayment program so that borrowers never have to pay more than 10 percent of what they make.

Fully paid for:

    This plan will cost in the range of $350 billion over 10 years – and will be fully paid for by limiting certain tax expenditures for high-income taxpayers.

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In a major policy announcement, Hillary Clinton outlined her plan for college affordability at a Town Hall in Exeter NH today.  See her presentation of the New College Compact at the link below.

Link to event video here >>>>

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton answers reporters questions about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump after announcing her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the high school in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton answers reporters questions about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump after announcing her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the high school in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (R) arrives for a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (R) arrives for a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire, August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton announces her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the High School in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton announces her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the High School in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a question from the audience during a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a question from the audience during a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a question from the audience during a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a question from the audience during a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a question from the audience during a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a question from the audience during a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton answers a question from the audience during a campaign town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire August 10, 2015. Clinton spoke about her plans to make college more affordable.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions after announcing her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the high school in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions after announcing her college affordability plan, Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, at the high school in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a town hall meeting at Exeter High School August 10, 2015 in Exeter, New Hampshire. Clinton discussed college affordability and student debt relief. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a town hall meeting at Exeter High School August 10, 2015 in Exeter, New Hampshire. Clinton discussed college affordability and student debt relief. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

 

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VOLUNTEERDemocratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton arrives at the high school in Exeter, N.H., Monday, Aug. 10, 2015, where she announced her college affordability plan.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

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