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Keynote Speakers

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Hillary Rodham ClintonFormer Secretary of State &
Former U.S. Senator from New York
Tuesday, April 8th

Hillary Rodham Clinton served as the 67th U.S. Secretary of State from 2009 until 2013, after nearly four decades in public service. Her “smart power” approach to foreign policy repositioned American diplomacy and development for the 21st century. Clinton played a central role in restoring America’s standing in the world, reasserting the United States as a Pacific power, imposing crippling sanctions on Iran and North Korea, responding to the Arab Awakening and negotiating a ceasefire in the Middle East. Earlier, as First Lady and Senator from New York, she traveled to more than 80 countries as a champion of human rights, democracy, and opportunities for women and girls. Clinton also worked to provide health care to millions of children, create jobs and opportunity, and support first responders who risked their lives at Ground Zero. In her historic campaign for President, Clinton won 18 million votes.

Read more >>>>

Later on April 8 Hillary will speak to the World Affairs Council of Oregon in Portland.

In honor of Women’s History Month, the Clinton Foundation and the Clinton School of Public Service will host a dynamic panel on empowerment of women and girls. From women’s suffrage movement in America to the Arab Spring, countless exceptional women have redefined their role in the world on their own terms. Yet the reality for many girls and women is still stark: over 60 million girls still do not have access to primary education. The education and empowerment of girls and women is not only a moral issue—it is also a critical economic issue. The panel discussion will explore the people and projects that are working to empower women and girls.

Panelists include:
Penny Abeywadena, Head of Girls & Women, Associate Director, Commitments with the Clinton Global Initiative
Jimmie Briggs, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Man Up Campaign
Ruby Johnson, General Co-Coordinator, FRIDA/The Young Feminist Fund
Jerry Jones, Chief Ethics and Legal Officer, EVP, Acxiom
Sarah Kambou, President, International Center for Research on Women
Immaculee Kayitare, Clinton School of Public Service Class of 2014 student from Kigali, Rwanda
Sarah Thorn, Senior Director, Federal Government Relations, Walmart


When: Monday, March 17, 2014 at 6:00 p.m.
Where: Clinton Presidential Center, Great Hall

*Program is free and open to the public. However, reservations are required. Reserve your seats by emailing publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu or calling (501) 683-5239.

See more  >>>>

I don’t know how I missed this important op-ed co-authored by Hillary and Chelsea back in February addressing a very serious issue.  It came through in an email from the Clinton Foundation today.
09-09-13-Y-04

Loopholes must be closed and sanctions imposed, write Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton
Seventy-two boxes – that is all that was left of 100 African elephants, killed for their tusks. Confiscated from an office in New York City’s diamond district in 2012, the 72 office boxes were filled with small ivory beads, figurines, charms and toys.
Demand for these trinkets, often from consumers unaware the ivory comes from animals recently and illegally killed, is what drives the mass slaughter of elephants.
In a recent interview, a convicted poacher who spent a decade running a gang in Kenya admitted to personally killing more than 70 elephants. “My attacks were so frequent that the elephants could not mate and have calves. There were not enough male bull elephants left,” he said.
These examples, sad but unfortunately all too common, reveal the international ivory trade at its most brutal. An estimated 35,000 elephants and more than 1,000 rhinos were killed last year alone. At this rate we are on a path towards the extinction of both elephants and rhinos on the African continent.
This is an ecological and moral disaster. But that is not all. Illegal poaching and trafficking also represent an economic and security challenge in Africa and beyond.
We have seen al-Shabaab from Somalia, the Janjaweed from Sudan, the Lord’s Resistance Army in east Africa and other armed groups move into illegal wildlife trafficking. It has become a multibillion-dollar business, facilitated by the same sophisticated criminal networks that are dealing in drugs, taking hostages on the open seas, and financing illegal arms sales and terrorist groups.
In recent years wildlife trafficking has become more structured, more lucrative and more ruthless than ever before. Poachers now use helicopters, automatic weapons, night-vision goggles and satellite phones to overwhelm and even kill park rangers and other local authorities. More than 1,000 wildlife rangers across the world have been murdered by these groups in the past decade.
These criminals are spreading instability, undermining the rule of law and threatening the tourist trade that is the lifeblood of so many African communities.
On both sides of the Atlantic, the scourge of wildlife trafficking has been centre stage recently. This month the White House announced a ban on new commercial ivory sales in the US and released a national strategy to address the illegal exploitation of elephants, rhinos and other wildlife. In London, the Duke of Cambridge, the Prince of Wales and the UK government hosted an international conference to address the wildlife trafficking crisis. Delegates from 46 countries and 11 UN organisations signed a declaration promising to improve cross-border co-operation and strengthen laws and policing.
We strongly endorse a complete ban on ivory sales in the US. The global ban agreed in 1989 was successful in stemming a previous killing spree. Over time, however, exceptions have eviscerated the international ban and illegal ivory is now routinely bought and sold under one or more loopholes, providing cover for illegal traffickers. These need to be closed and sanctions imposed on countries that continue to trade in ivory products.
We are proud of the steps the US is taking and encouraged by the declaration made in London. But governments cannot end this crisis alone – private-sector action is needed as well.
At the Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in September last year we brought together a coalition of African states, conservation organisations and other concerned parties to announce an $80m commitment to action, called the Partnership to Save Africa’s Elephants. Our goal is to “stop the killing, stop the trafficking and stop the demand”. With more than a dozen partners, we are scaling up anti-poaching enforcement at 50 sites; strengthening intelligence networks; imposing tougher penalties for violations; and more.
Ultimately, saving Africa’s elephants depends on consumers everywhere. We need to connect the dots for people between the ivory goods they see in stores and the carcasses of dead elephants half a world away. And as consumers, we should urge companies to help law enforcement authorities disrupt the transfer of tusks, rhino horn and wildlife products on ships, aircraft and trucks. Financial institutions should help to trace illegal transactions, freeze assets and impound ill-gotten gains from illegal trafficking. Retailers need to stop selling ivory products. And businesses need to blow the whistle on government officials and institutions that have been corrupted by this lucrative, illegal trade.
Only by working together can we beat this crisis, break the nexus between trafficking and terrorism, and make sure these incredible creatures will roam the earth for generations to come.
​This op-ed originally appeared in the Financial Times on February 24, 2014.

- See more >>>>

We all have a role to play in ending the ivory trade

Share

1000 1684 7
Loopholes must be closed and sanctions imposed, write Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton
Seventy-two boxes – that is all that was left of 100 African elephants, killed for their tusks. Confiscated from an office in New York City’s diamond district in 2012, the 72 office boxes were filled with small ivory beads, figurines, charms and toys.
Demand for these trinkets, often from consumers unaware the ivory comes from animals recently and illegally killed, is what drives the mass slaughter of elephants.
In a recent interview, a convicted poacher who spent a decade running a gang in Kenya admitted to personally killing more than 70 elephants. “My attacks were so frequent that the elephants could not mate and have calves. There were not enough male bull elephants left,” he said.
These examples, sad but unfortunately all too common, reveal the international ivory trade at its most brutal. An estimated 35,000 elephants and more than 1,000 rhinos were killed last year alone. At this rate we are on a path towards the extinction of both elephants and rhinos on the African continent.
This is an ecological and moral disaster. But that is not all. Illegal poaching and trafficking also represent an economic and security challenge in Africa and beyond.
We have seen al-Shabaab from Somalia, the Janjaweed from Sudan, the Lord’s Resistance Army in east Africa and other armed groups move into illegal wildlife trafficking. It has become a multibillion-dollar business, facilitated by the same sophisticated criminal networks that are dealing in drugs, taking hostages on the open seas, and financing illegal arms sales and terrorist groups.
In recent years wildlife trafficking has become more structured, more lucrative and more ruthless than ever before. Poachers now use helicopters, automatic weapons, night-vision goggles and satellite phones to overwhelm and even kill park rangers and other local authorities. More than 1,000 wildlife rangers across the world have been murdered by these groups in the past decade.
These criminals are spreading instability, undermining the rule of law and threatening the tourist trade that is the lifeblood of so many African communities.
On both sides of the Atlantic, the scourge of wildlife trafficking has been centre stage recently. This month the White House announced a ban on new commercial ivory sales in the US and released a national strategy to address the illegal exploitation of elephants, rhinos and other wildlife. In London, the Duke of Cambridge, the Prince of Wales and the UK government hosted an international conference to address the wildlife trafficking crisis. Delegates from 46 countries and 11 UN organisations signed a declaration promising to improve cross-border co-operation and strengthen laws and policing.
We strongly endorse a complete ban on ivory sales in the US. The global ban agreed in 1989 was successful in stemming a previous killing spree. Over time, however, exceptions have eviscerated the international ban and illegal ivory is now routinely bought and sold under one or more loopholes, providing cover for illegal traffickers. These need to be closed and sanctions imposed on countries that continue to trade in ivory products.
We are proud of the steps the US is taking and encouraged by the declaration made in London. But governments cannot end this crisis alone – private-sector action is needed as well.
At the Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in September last year we brought together a coalition of African states, conservation organisations and other concerned parties to announce an $80m commitment to action, called the Partnership to Save Africa’s Elephants. Our goal is to “stop the killing, stop the trafficking and stop the demand”. With more than a dozen partners, we are scaling up anti-poaching enforcement at 50 sites; strengthening intelligence networks; imposing tougher penalties for violations; and more.
Ultimately, saving Africa’s elephants depends on consumers everywhere. We need to connect the dots for people between the ivory goods they see in stores and the carcasses of dead elephants half a world away. And as consumers, we should urge companies to help law enforcement authorities disrupt the transfer of tusks, rhino horn and wildlife products on ships, aircraft and trucks. Financial institutions should help to trace illegal transactions, freeze assets and impound ill-gotten gains from illegal trafficking. Retailers need to stop selling ivory products. And businesses need to blow the whistle on government officials and institutions that have been corrupted by this lucrative, illegal trade.
Only by working together can we beat this crisis, break the nexus between trafficking and terrorism, and make sure these incredible creatures will roam the earth for generations to come.
​This op-ed originally appeared in the Financial Times on February 24, 2014.

- See more at: http://www.clintonfoundation.org/blog/2014/02/24/we-all-have-role-play-ending-ivory-trade?utm_source=031314news2&utm_medium=email&utm_term=returning&utm_content=20140313&utm_campaign=news#sthash.A3dBmoMq.dpuf

 

We all have a role to play in ending the ivory trade

Share

1000 1684 7
Loopholes must be closed and sanctions imposed, write Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton
Seventy-two boxes – that is all that was left of 100 African elephants, killed for their tusks. Confiscated from an office in New York City’s diamond district in 2012, the 72 office boxes were filled with small ivory beads, figurines, charms and toys.
Demand for these trinkets, often from consumers unaware the ivory comes from animals recently and illegally killed, is what drives the mass slaughter of elephants.
In a recent interview, a convicted poacher who spent a decade running a gang in Kenya admitted to personally killing more than 70 elephants. “My attacks were so frequent that the elephants could not mate and have calves. There were not enough male bull elephants left,” he said.
These examples, sad but unfortunately all too common, reveal the international ivory trade at its most brutal. An estimated 35,000 elephants and more than 1,000 rhinos were killed last year alone. At this rate we are on a path towards the extinction of both elephants and rhinos on the African continent.
This is an ecological and moral disaster. But that is not all. Illegal poaching and trafficking also represent an economic and security challenge in Africa and beyond.
We have seen al-Shabaab from Somalia, the Janjaweed from Sudan, the Lord’s Resistance Army in east Africa and other armed groups move into illegal wildlife trafficking. It has become a multibillion-dollar business, facilitated by the same sophisticated criminal networks that are dealing in drugs, taking hostages on the open seas, and financing illegal arms sales and terrorist groups.
In recent years wildlife trafficking has become more structured, more lucrative and more ruthless than ever before. Poachers now use helicopters, automatic weapons, night-vision goggles and satellite phones to overwhelm and even kill park rangers and other local authorities. More than 1,000 wildlife rangers across the world have been murdered by these groups in the past decade.
These criminals are spreading instability, undermining the rule of law and threatening the tourist trade that is the lifeblood of so many African communities.
On both sides of the Atlantic, the scourge of wildlife trafficking has been centre stage recently. This month the White House announced a ban on new commercial ivory sales in the US and released a national strategy to address the illegal exploitation of elephants, rhinos and other wildlife. In London, the Duke of Cambridge, the Prince of Wales and the UK government hosted an international conference to address the wildlife trafficking crisis. Delegates from 46 countries and 11 UN organisations signed a declaration promising to improve cross-border co-operation and strengthen laws and policing.
We strongly endorse a complete ban on ivory sales in the US. The global ban agreed in 1989 was successful in stemming a previous killing spree. Over time, however, exceptions have eviscerated the international ban and illegal ivory is now routinely bought and sold under one or more loopholes, providing cover for illegal traffickers. These need to be closed and sanctions imposed on countries that continue to trade in ivory products.
We are proud of the steps the US is taking and encouraged by the declaration made in London. But governments cannot end this crisis alone – private-sector action is needed as well.
At the Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in September last year we brought together a coalition of African states, conservation organisations and other concerned parties to announce an $80m commitment to action, called the Partnership to Save Africa’s Elephants. Our goal is to “stop the killing, stop the trafficking and stop the demand”. With more than a dozen partners, we are scaling up anti-poaching enforcement at 50 sites; strengthening intelligence networks; imposing tougher penalties for violations; and more.
Ultimately, saving Africa’s elephants depends on consumers everywhere. We need to connect the dots for people between the ivory goods they see in stores and the carcasses of dead elephants half a world away. And as consumers, we should urge companies to help law enforcement authorities disrupt the transfer of tusks, rhino horn and wildlife products on ships, aircraft and trucks. Financial institutions should help to trace illegal transactions, freeze assets and impound ill-gotten gains from illegal trafficking. Retailers need to stop selling ivory products. And businesses need to blow the whistle on government officials and institutions that have been corrupted by this lucrative, illegal trade.
Only by working together can we beat this crisis, break the nexus between trafficking and terrorism, and make sure these incredible creatures will roam the earth for generations to come.
​This op-ed originally appeared in the Financial Times on February 24, 2014.

- See more at: http://www.clintonfoundation.org/blog/2014/02/24/we-all-have-role-play-ending-ivory-trade?utm_source=031314news2&utm_medium=email&utm_term=returning&utm_content=20140313&utm_campaign=news#sthash.A3dBmoMq.dpuf

 

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The information comes from a very few tweets from this annual affair at which both Condoleeza Rice and George W. Bush have been past speakers.  The only pictures were instagrams that can be seen here and here.

The dinner this evening wrapped up a three-day conference of the Drugs, Chemicals, and Associated Technologies Association at the Waldorf Astoria in New York.  There were four banquet rooms, according to one report, and the dinner was sold out.

in-her-own-words

Hillary Clinton

In Her Own Words

Skilled orators know that quotations are a powerful platform from which to launch an idea. Whether you deliver a lot of public addresses, do door-to-door campaigning for your chosen candidates, or count yourself among the listeners you know the effect of the well-selected, well-placed quote. As we all prepare to go into mid-term campaign mode, this new collection from Lisa Rogak is a work that Hillary Clinton fans will want to have handy.

Quotations are arranged alphabetically by subject. It is a quick and easy reference for those seeking Hillary’s thoughts on many topics. Whether seeking a single relevant quote on a topic or collecting a variety for talking points, you can easily skim through the table of contents for just the right words. Thorough and meticulously organized, this is an edition Hillary loyalists will appreciate and find useful.   As her supporters and fans can expect,  Hillary’s wit and humor make it fun to read.

Thank, you Lisa Rogak!

As announced here last month, Hillary will be delivering the keynote at the Association of American Publishers meeting next week.  According to this,  some lucky folks will be taking home a free copy of the book.

Seal Press Author Shares Collection of Surprising Hillary Clinton Quotes

On March 19, 2014, Hillary Clinton will be giving the keynote address at the Association of American Publishers meeting. Just in time for the appearance, Lisa Rogak—editor of the newly released Hillary Clinton in Her Own Words—shares some surprising quotes from the book and offers free copies to five lucky winners.

Read more and see some quotes >>>>

If you will not be attending the AAP meeting, you can get the book here.

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Just A Little Routine Can Go A Long Way

In our society, routines are often described as boring or conforming, and typically don’t hold much appeal. But to very young children, small routines related to basic care like feeding, toileting and bedtimes can help them feel more secure, and can give them the emotional tools they need to more readily handle bigger changes in their lives. Additionally, establishing healthy habits early in life can help ensure that children will continue those healthy habits well into adulthood.

When a baby is first born, she looks to her parents and caregivers for the basic care that will help her survive and thrive. She quickly learns that if she cries, she will be fed or cuddled, for example. A young child that consistently misses naptimes when she is tired, or whose cries are ignored when she is hungry, experiences high levels of stress that can be toxic to her developing brain. Establishing predictable patterns around when she will be fed or played with will help her learn that she is loved and cared for, and reduces any anxiety that those things will not happen.

These early healthy habits can be helpful to parents, too. Experts agree that parents and caregivers who practice routines with their children feel more relaxed, and have more time to enjoy the things that they like to do as well.

Some ways that parents can practice setting routines for their very little ones include establishing family mealtimes, wherein children learn that nourishment comes at certain times during the day and is experienced with loved ones close by. Parents can also practice setting regular naptimes and bedtimes for babies as early as four months, and can signal to their children that it’s time to sleep by giving a bath, reading a book or singing a song. And if an established routine is turned upside down due to illness or travel, returning to a familiar schedule can be done fairly easily. The more consistency a child experiences in his day-to-day life, the better prepared and happier he will be.

Learn more:

In The News:

 

Special Feature

From prayer to Table Talk, how one parent set a mealtime routine—and family tradition—that helped her family reconnect. >>

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President Bill Clinton, Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, and Chelsea Clinton to Bring Together More Than 1,000 College Student Leaders for 2014 Meeting of CGI University, March 21-23 at Arizona State University

Featured participants include U.S. Senator John McCain, Bill Drayton, Gabrielle Giffords, Mark Kelly, Jimmy Kimmel, Cindy Hensley McCain, Reeta Roy, María Elena Salinas, Jimmy Wales, and Lauryn Williams; students to take action on some of Generation Y’s biggest social, economic, and environmental concerns

Chelsea Clinton to mobilize students for Day of Action March 23 with PHX Renews in downtown Phoenix

NEW YORK – Today, details were announced for the seventh annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U), where President Bill Clinton, Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, and Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton will convene more than 1,000 student leaders from around the world at Arizona State University, March 21-23. These undergraduate and graduate students will engage in developing solutions to some of the most pressing concerns of the Millennial generation, including human rights, women’s social and economic empowerment, and combatting HIV/AIDS in the United States. They will be joined by experts, entrepreneurs, and civically engaged celebrities such as  Bill Drayton, Chief Executive Officer, Ashoka; Gabrielle Giffords, Former U.S. Representative and Founder, Americans for Responsible Solutions; Mark Kelly, Former Astronaut and Founder, Americans for Responsible Solutions; Jimmy Kimmel, Host and Executive Producer, “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”; John McCain, U.S. Senator from Arizona; Cindy Hensley McCain, Founding Member, Eastern Congo Initiative; Reeta Roy, President and Chief Executive Officer, The MasterCard Foundation; María Elena Salinas, Anchor, Univision News; Jimmy Wales, Founder, Wikipedia; and Lauryn Williams, U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist in Sprinting and Silver Medalist in Bobsledding.

“Each year, the commitments and partnerships that come out of CGI University prove that young people are not only up to the task of working towards a safer, more sustainable world, but that they are eager to get started now,” said Chelsea Clinton. “Whether interested in starting a social venture to fight HIV/AIDS or increasing women’s interest in STEM in remote areas of the world, students come to CGI U to turn their ideas into action. We are thrilled to bring this meeting to ASU, which has the largest solar energy portfolio of any university in America and a strong commitment to positive social change and innovation.”

CGI U 2014 attendees will have access to more than $750,000 in seed funding to implement their Commitments to Action: new, specific, and measurable plans to address urgent challenges. The funding marks the largest sum in the meeting’s history, including $650,000 from the growing CGI University Network of more than 55 colleges and universities and another $100,000 through the Resolution Project Social Venture Challenge, a competition between aspiring student entrepreneurs with sustainable enterprises.

Over the past six years, students have made more than 4,000 Commitments to Action, including a CGI U commitment made by Harvard University student Jessica Matthews, which led to the creation of Soccket, a soccer ball that doubles as an eco-friendly generator for people in resource-poor regions. Dartmouth College student Ashifi Gogo made a CGI U commitment to use text messaging to combat the proliferation of counterfeit drugs in the developing world. This became Sproxil, a social business that has raised more than $1.8 million, secured major pharmaceutical clients, and has now been used nearly 8 million times.

The fourth annual CGI U Commitments Challenge launched March 10, featuring a national online competition of new commitment ideas from college and university students in the form of a “bracket.” This year, CGI is partnering with Crowdrise, one of the largest online platforms dedicated to raising money for charity and amazing causes, to power the competition and help student “teams” fundraise for their new commitments. The public now has the opportunity to donate to their favorite CGI U 2014 commitment at http://www.cgiu.org/challenge. The first qualifying round runs through this Thursday, with the top 16 teams being seeded into a bracket competition that begins on Friday, March 14.  Last year’s winner, Arizona State University student Davier Rodriguez, created an award-winning CGI U commitment to develop DREAMzone, a program that will establish a national network of allies to support undocumented students in Arizona and beyond.

On March 23, students will gather in downtown Phoenix for the Clinton Foundation’s ninth Day of Action. The morning of community service will be in collaboration with PHX Renews, a partnership between the City of Phoenix and Keep Phoenix Beautiful that aims to transform previously vacant lots in the city into vibrant and sustainable public spaces. To kick off the Day of Action, Chelsea Clinton and President Bill Clinton will be joined by Mayor of Phoenix Greg Stanton, and Co-Founders of Americans for Responsible Solutions Former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords and Former Astronaut Mark Kelly.

Building off the success of the Clinton Foundation’s Codeathon series, young people will have the opportunity to participate in a codeathon in the lead up to the meeting, on Thursday, March 20, and Friday, March 21. The codeathon aims to spur innovation in the technology space and increase the scope, reach, and impact of CGI U Commitments to Action. The two-day session will challenge student developers and designers to build unique digital prototypes inspired by CGI U commitments that address education, global health, and water quality issues.

Throughout the meeting, students will engage in various topic- and skill-based sessions, which will empower them to get involved with solving major global challenges while they’re still in school.

Sessions at CGI U 2014 will include:

  • The Age of Participation, which will bring together students, entrepreneurs, and celebrities to explore promising new opportunities to affect change in the 21st century;
  • Coming in Second: Scaling What Works, which will highlight how social innovators can avoid reinventing the wheel by aligning  with organizations that have already achieved strong results; and
  • The Future of Higher Education: Redefining Learning As We Know It, in which entrepreneurs, innovators, and educators will address how colleges can better boost learning outcomes, prepare students of all socioeconomic backgrounds for the job market, and cultivate the skills necessary for becoming productive global citizens.

For the complete schedule, visit http://cgilink.org/1ckXpVr.

Featured participants at the CGI U 2014 meeting will include: Derrick Ashong, Host and Special Correspondent, Fusion; Tina Barseghian, Editor, MindShift; Ken Berger, President and Chief Executive Officer, Charity Navigator; Sujata Bhatt, Founder, The Incubator School; Kevin Bleyer, Emmy award-winning writer/producer for “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” “Dennis Miller,” and “Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher”; Asi Burak, President, Games for Change; Lily Cole, Founder, impossible; Michael M. Crow, President, Arizona State University; Manjula Dissanayake, Founding President, Educate Lanka Foundation, Inc.; Bill Drayton, Chief Executive Officer, Ashoka; Jay Feely, Professional Football Player, Arizona Cardinals; Gabrielle Giffords, Former U.S. Representative and Founder, Americans for Responsible Solutions; Wahleah Johns, Co-founder, Black Mesa Water Coalition; Mark Kelly, Former Astronaut and Founder, Americans for Responsible Solutions; Jimmy Kimmel, Host and Executive Producer, “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”; Adnan Mahmud, Chief Executive Officer, Live Stories; Ludwick Marishane, DryBath Inventor, Headboy Industries Inc.; Dulce Matuz, President, Arizona DREAM Act Coalition; John McCain, U.S. Senator from Arizona; Cindy Hensley McCain, Founding Member, Eastern Congo Initiative; Alicia Menendez, Host, Fusion; Maria Menounos, Host, “Extra!”, Founder, Take Action Hollywood!, Deogratias Niyizonkiza, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Village Health Works; Jamar Rogers, Musician, Dream On Productions and HIV/AIDS Activist; Reeta Roy, President and Chief Executive Officer, The MasterCard Foundation; María Elena Salinas, Anchor, Univision News; Amirah Sequeira, National Coordinator, Student Global AIDS Campaign; Greg Stanton, Mayor, City of Phoenix; Nancy Sutley, Former Chair, White House Council on Environmental Quality; Michael Tubbs, Council Member, City of Stockton; Jimmy Wales, Founder, Wikipedia; Patrick Walsh, Co-founder and Chief Impact Officer, CLASSY Awards; Lauryn Williams, Olympic Gold Medalist in Sprinting and Silver Medalist in Bobsledding; Phill Wilson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Black AIDS Institute; and more.

Follow us on Twitter at @CGIU and @ClintonGlobal or on Facebook at Facebook.com/CGIUniversity for meeting news and highlights. The official meeting hashtag is #CGIU. Plenary sessions will also be live streamed during the meeting at live.cgiu.org.

Support for CGI U 2014 is generously provided by: American Association of University Women; Andy Nahas and The Prospect Fund; Laureate International Universities; MasterCard Foundation; Microsoft; Peter G. Peterson Foundation; Pederson Group, Inc.; and the Ramsey Social Justice Foundation.

About Clinton Global Initiative University
The Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U), a program of the Clinton Global Initiative, brings together college students to address global challenges with practical, innovative solutions. CGI U participants do more than simply discuss problems – they take concrete steps to solve them by creating action plans, building relationships, participating in hands-on workshops, and following up with CGI U as they complete their projects. Since 2008, students have made more than 4,000 Commitments to Action. Previous CGI U meetings have taken place at Tulane University, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Miami, the University of California at San Diego, the George Washington University, and Washington University in St. Louis, and have convened more than 5,500 students from over 800 schools, 130 countries, and all 50 states. To learn more, visit cgiu.org.

Established in 2005 by President Bill Clinton, the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI), an initiative of Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation, convenes global leaders year-round and at its Annual Meeting to create and implement innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges. CGI also convenes CGI America, a meeting focused on collaborative solutions to economic recovery in the United States. To date, members of the CGI community have made more than 2,800 Commitments to Action, which are already improving the lives of more than 430 million people in over 180 countries. When fully funded and implemented, these commitments will be valued at $103 billion. For more information, visit clintonglobalinitiative.org and follow us on Twitter @ClintonGlobal and Facebook at facebook.com/clintonglobalinitiative.

About Arizona State University
Arizona State University is one of the nation’s leading public research universities and is ranked among the top 100 universities in the world.

Known for innovation and entrepreneurism, ASU has pioneered the model for a New American University with a focus on accessibility and quality education, training students to learn for a lifetime. According to its mission, ASU will be measured not by who we exclude, but rather by who we include and how they succeed; pursuing research and discovery that benefits the public good; assuming major responsibility for the economic, social, and cultural vitality and health and well-being of the community.

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