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Posts Tagged ‘Henry Kissinger’

We have known for weeks that Hillary Clinton would be in Los Angeles next Wednesday to receive the Warren Christopher Public Service Award from the Pacific Council on International Relations.   We did not know, however,  that she would be honored last night at the Atlantic Council Awards dinner.

Henry Kissinger presented her with the council’s Distinguished Leadership Award with a quip about “at least four” secretaries of state who went on to become president.*  Apparently unfazed, Hillary responded, “When I became secretary of state, I spent a lot of time thinking about my illustrious predecessors – not primarily the ones who went on to become president.”

As secretary of state,  Hillary often expressed her deep admiration for several of those predecessors  While it has always seemed that George Marshall  topped her list, we have seen a strong, cordial relationship develop between Hillary and Henry over the years as the photos attest.  If  the text of her remarks are released, I will add them here.

Bill Clinton presented an award to Tony Bennett.  Also honored at the event was NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen.

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Here is a partial account from the Atlantic Council website.  There are additional photos there as well.

Distinguished Leadership Awards Offers Perfect Mix of Substance and Style

Former US President Bill Clinton presented the next award via video address for Distinguished Artistic Leaership to legendary performer and humanitarian Tony Bennett. President Clinton praised Bennett for his illustrious musical career, but also his significant work as an advocate and humanitarian. “As long as I’ve known him,” said President Clinton, “he has truly been a citizen of the world: an extraordinary individual who served his country in World War II, marched with Dr. Martin Luther King in Selma in 1965, and has devoted his generous spirit to charitable causes all across the globe.”

The final award for Distinguished International Leadership was presented to former First Lady, US Senator, and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Secretary Clinton was presented with video tributes by President of Malawi Joyce Banda and internationally-renowned political activist Aung San Suu Kyi. She was introduced in person by former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor Dr. Henry Kissinger. Secretary Clinton accepted her award and delivered brief remarks on the state of the transatlantic alliance and the three primary challenges facing NATO in the coming decades: energy security, trade cooperation, and conflict readiness. Secretary Clinton seized the opportunity to endorse a comprehensive transatlantic trade agreement, and to stress that all members of NATO must redouble their efforts to promote transatlantic values around the world. “We cannot afford to let the greatest alliance in history slide into military irrelevance,” she urged.

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Click on the playlist to find Hillary’s speech.  (Wow!  Did I ever hit the nail on the head with George Marshal!  I did not even know what was in this speech!)

*In case you wondered, it was six secretaries of state who went on to become president.  The last was James Buchanan.

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If you voted in this poll last week, you might be interested to know that Hillary won impressively and now is being pitted against Thomas Jefferson. Scroll down to see the latest poll.

Presidential Madness (Round 2): Favorite modern secretary of state

By NCC Staff | National Constitution Center

Here are the six nominees for best modern secretary of state, along with a quick bio of their time in office:

1. George C. Marshall. Served 1947 – 1949. As Harry Truman’s secretary of state, Marshall’s Plan rebuilt Europe after World War II, and he was later awarded a Nobel Prize for his efforts.

2. Henry Kissinger. Served 1973 – 1977. The high-profile secretary for Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, Kissinger was a career diplomat who pioneered the policy of detente with the Soviet Union.

3. George P. Shultz. Served 1982 – 1989. Only one of two people to serve in four different cabinet positions, Shultz led the State Department for most of the Reagan era.

4. Madeleine Albright. Served 1997 – 2001. The first woman to serve as secretary, Albright played an important role in the Clinton administration.

5. Condoleezza Rice. Served 2005 – 2009. A Shultz protégé, Rice first served as President George W. Bush’s national security adviser before becoming secretary of state.

6. Hillary Clinton. Served 2009 – 2013. The former first lady served in the Senate and then became the most-traveled secretary ever as part of the Obama administration.

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Here is the less than fair and balanced poll pitting Hillary (the “modern” winner) against Thomas Jefferson (the “historical winner). It is never fair to pit an historical figure against one whose history is not complete. For what it is worth, here is that poll.

Presidential Madness (Round 9): Pick the best secretary of state ever!

At Constitution Daily, madness doesn’t just apply to the NCAA—it’s also an awesome excuse to give the bracket treatment to the executive branch of government. This year, it’s all about the presidential Cabinet.

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Round 9: Best secretary of state ever!

In earlier voting, our readers chose the best historical and modern secretaries of state from a star-studded field of diplomats.

In the historical division, Thomas Jefferson edged out James Madison in the fight between the Founding Fathers. William Seward and John Quincy Adams were also contenders in a four-way battle of big historical names.

In the modern division, Hillary Clinton had an easier time, taking an impressive 46 percent of the vote in defeating Henry Kissinger, George Marshall and Condoleeza Rice.

Click here to read more and vote >>>>

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Presidential Madness (Round 2): Favorite modern secretary of state

By NCC Staff | National Constitution Center

Here are the six nominees for best modern secretary of state, along with a quick bio of their time in office:

1. George C. Marshall. Served 1947 – 1949. As Harry Truman’s secretary of state, Marshall’s Plan rebuilt Europe after World War II, and he was later awarded a Nobel Prize for his efforts.

2. Henry Kissinger. Served 1973 – 1977. The high-profile secretary for Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, Kissinger was a career diplomat who pioneered the policy of detente with the Soviet Union.

3. George P. Shultz. Served 1982 – 1989. Only one of two people to serve in four different cabinet positions, Shultz led the State Department for most of the Reagan era.

4. Madeleine Albright. Served 1997 – 2001. The first woman to serve as secretary, Albright played an important role in the Clinton administration.

5. Condoleezza Rice. Served 2005 – 2009. A Shultz protégé, Rice first served as President George W. Bush’s national security adviser before becoming secretary of state.

6. Hillary Clinton. Served 2009 – 2013. The former first lady served in the Senate and then became the most-traveled secretary ever as part of the Obama administration.

Pick your favorite in our poll below, and check back each day to see a new March Cabinet Madness vote!

Note: If you can’t see the poll below, use this link: http://poll.fm/45otg

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New York Magazine has an article about our Hillary.

Hillary Clinton on Kissinger, Albright and Women

By

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 1:  (AFP OUT) U.S. President Barack Obama stands after addressing the nation on TV from the East Room of the White House to make a televised statement May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC.  Bin Laden has been killed near Islamabad, Pakistan almost a decade after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and his body is in possession of the United States. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski-Pool/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Barack Obama;

Departing Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently shared some of the wisdom gleaned from twenty years in the White House with Mitt Romney’s favorite magazine, The Economist. Clinton has visited 95 countries and traveled 730,000 miles since joining Obama’s cabinet, and Kirsten Gillibrand recently told BuzzFeed that she’ll be “one of the first to ask Hillary to run in 2016.” In the lengthy interview, Clinton got kind of whimsical about the past and talked about signing a treaty she’d never heard about.

Some of the choice bits:

Click here to read them!!!!

 

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I waited all day yesterday to see the State Department post pictures from this event.  They finally are up,  but so far I do not see a video.  If they do post video, I will add it here.   This event was listed on her Thursday schedule.

6:20 p.m.  Secretary Clinton hosts a gala dinner celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Diplomatic Reception Rooms and the completion of the Patrons of Diplomacy endowment campaign, at the Department of State. Secretary Clinton is joined at the event by former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger, Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell.
(OPEN PRESS COVERAGE)

Opening Remarks at the Gala Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Diplomatic Reception Rooms and the Completion of the Patrons of Diplomacy Endowment Campaign

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Benjamin Franklin Room
Washington, DC
October 27, 2011

Thank you and good evening. (Applause.) Thank you very much. Thank you for joining us this evening. Thank you, Mr. Franklin, for being here tonight. I often reference your portrait when we hold events here in this room named for you, and I never thought I’d be able to thank you in person for all you have done. (Laughter.) And let us thank again the incomparable Jesse Norman who has thrilled audiences all over the world. And I especially wish to thank Secretaries Kissinger, Albright, and Powell, and representatives of the families of Secretary Eagleburger and Secretary Christopher.

In just a short time they will all be receiving an award commemorating this occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Diplomatic Rooms, and I want to personally thank each of them for being with us. I also wish to recognize all of our ambassadors from the diplomatic community and Madam Chen, a special visitor from China, who are with us this evening.

And I want especially to thank the chairs of the Patrons of Diplomacy Initiative, the members of the Endowment Fund, and all of you who have contributed to these rooms for joining us and being a true patron of diplomacy. You are making a contribution to the work that we do every single day in this building and particularly here on the Eighth floor. Because of your efforts, we are able to celebrate two milestones: the 50th anniversary of these historic rooms, and the $20 million raised for the Patrons of Diplomacy Endowment. (Applause.)

When I was first honored to be Secretary of State and came here in that capacity to the State Department, I was surprised to learn there was no permanent funding to support the Diplomatic Reception Rooms or the collection that includes such treasures as that desk and the critical preservation and conservation work that is needed in order to fulfill our obligations to the stewardship that we hold as we assume this position. And each year, Marcee Craighill, our curator for the rooms, was forced to make very difficult decisions about which objects would be conserved and which would not.

And we thought that it would be appropriate, as we moved toward the 50th anniversary and commemorated the great work that Clement Conger got us started on 50 years ago, for I to ask my predecessors to assist us in this effort. All of them agreed, including those who could not be with us this evening.

So with Marcee’s guidance and with the extraordinary commitment of Under Secretary Pat Kennedy, Ambassador Capricia Marshall, the Office of Protocol, we launched Patrons of Diplomacy last October. And this special initiative has, for the time, created this endowment that will care for the preservation and maintenance of the 42 diplomatic reception rooms here at the State Department. I am so grateful to each of you. I also hope that at some time, if you weren’t able this evening to see the new Secretary’s Terrace, you will take a look there, because thanks to the generosity of the Endowment Fund and individual donors, we’re now able to make greater use of one of the best outdoor spaces with clearly the most amazing views in Washington.

So now we will turn to a great meal. Chef Jose Andres donated his talents. (Applause.) He and Jason Larkin, our State Department chef, they have put together a historic meal for us, which is described in tonight’s program. After dinner we will have a few additional words from each of our Secretaries. And I just want to conclude where I started, with a great thank you. We are so appreciative for your understanding the importance of these rooms to the work that each of us has been privileged to do on behalf of the country we love. Thank you very much. (Applause.)

Closing Remarks at the Gala Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Diplomatic Reception Rooms and the Completion of the Patrons of Diplomacy Endowment Campaign

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Benjamin Franklin Room
Washington, DC
October 27, 2011

Well, this has been quite an evening and we have thanked everyone for the extraordinary contributions that each of you has made. I am deeply grateful. For me, it was such a pleasure to be with my colleagues. When I was on my way in to becoming Secretary of State, Madeleine held a dinner at her home and invited all of the other Secretaries of State, and we sat around her dining room and each proceeded to give me excellent advice. For example, Warren Christopher told me never plan a vacation in August because a crisis seems to always happen in August. (Laughter.) And that has proven to be true, I must say. But it was a welcome into an extraordinary experience that I have only come to both relish and cherish even more as the months have gone forward.

It is, as each – Henry and Madeleine and Colin – have said, the most wonderful honor to represent our country. Wherever we go, whatever we’re doing, the fact that we are there on behalf of the United States of America never ceases to humble me, and also provide an extraordinary sense of responsibility.

So I am grateful to have this time to serve in this position. We all want to be good stewards of our capacity to pass on to those who come after the opportunity to use these rooms and to be part of the history that they represent. So for all of that we are each deeply grateful to you, the Patrons of Diplomacy. And on a personal note, I want to thank one more person for coming, a colleague in the Cabinet of mine, Kathleen Sebelius, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, who is here. (Applause.)

If you’re dealing with health care as I can attest from experience, Libya, Afghanistan, Pakistan – they seem easy in comparison. (Laughter.) But we are delighted Kathleen could join us, and, of course, she has the best seat in the house some would argue, sitting next to Michael Douglas, who’s been either referenced or introduced about five times. (Laughter.) But Michael, thank you for being here as well.

So as you leave this evening, we promised that it would be an evening that you would remember, but not be here for breakfast. (Laughter.) And so we have tried to keep to that promise and to give you a chance to be with those like you who support this work and understand its importance. We are all deeply, deeply grateful and we’ll gather again in 10 years for the 60th anniversary, assuming that then Secretary of State invites us all back. But for all of us, and those who could not be here with us thank you, good evening, and god speed. (Applause.)

Here is a related article with great pictures about the planning of the cake for the event.

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AH! Well I did find an embeddable video of this event at the CSPAN Video Library. Thank you, CSPAN. Secretary Clinton is the last speaker. Lovely, and funny tributes to a great man.

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Remarks at the Memorial Service for Former Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Arlington, VA
June 21, 2011

SECRETARY CLINTON: I want to thank the Eagleburger family, Scott, Andrew, Jason, for the invitation to share some observations about an extraordinary diplomat, not only on my own behalf, but on behalf of the men and women of the State Department.

When I first was asked to be Secretary of State by President Obama, I figured I should call all of my esteemed predecessors to ask for any words of advice. And I had met Secretary Eagleburger, but I cannot claim to have been a friend or a colleague. So when I called and I said I would very much appreciate any advice, he kept saying, “Keep your eye upon the doughnut and not upon the hole.” (Laughter.) And I said, “Excuse me?” (Laughter.) He said, “Well, exactly.” (Laughter.) And then I look at the back of this program with this wonderful picture of Larry and Marlene, and there is the favorite saying about keeping your eye upon the doughnut and not upon the hole. Every time I saw him since, he said, “Are you keeping your eye on the doughnut?” (Laughter.) And I said, “Well, Larry, if I could find the doughnut, I’d keep my eye on it for sure.”

I last saw Larry a month ago. He came to the State Department to join in the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Operations Center, which truly is the nerve center of the State Department. We met with many of the young watch officers who work grueling hours to keep what we call Ops, and as all of my predecessors know, running around the clock. And this turned out to be the kind of event that Larry loved. And I so appreciated him, because he rarely passed up an invitation to speak with the next generation of the United States Foreign and Civil Service.

Now on this occasion, Larry was not in the best of health. Andrew was there with him and others. He had two canes at the time. And he sat on the stage with the rest of us who were going to be speaking, and I was a little worried because he didn’t look well. But that disappeared as soon as he stood up and he got to that podium. The moment he took the microphone, he had everyone in that room in the palm of his hand, and he spoke with such great gusto, without a note, and as usual, with no qualms whatsoever about saying exactly what was on his mind.

I think in the years since Larry Eagleburger was Secretary, this town and many of us have become much more edited. So it was quite a treat for me to be sitting where I was sitting, looking at the faces of all of these young men and women turning to each other and saying, “Did he really say that?” (Laughter.)

He shared a story that encapsulated a great deal of what made him so special. He told all these young Foreign Service officers that one of his earliest jobs in the Foreign Service was with INR, the intelligence bureau, and his beat was Cuba. One morning in 1961, he came to work early and discovered that something big had happened in Cuba overnight, what we now know was the start of the Bay of Pigs invasion. And Larry thought it was his job to try to report on what was happening insofar as he could figure it out.

So he collected up all the facts available and he wrote up his analysis. Someone, he wrote, was trying to overthrow the Castro government and they were going to fail. (Laughter.) A few hours later, he discovered he was supporting the invasion, senior officials of the United States Government, and he discovered how they felt about his analysis. (Laughter.) He was summoned to the White House, and for several hours he was chewed out by one big shot after another.

Now, Larry was, in his own words, a junior, junior, junior officer, and plenty of people in those circumstances would have softened or moderated or even reversed their position, but not Larry. He just kept explaining his point of view repeatedly, never backing down. And eventually he was issued a warning never to cross paths with the Kennedy Administration again. And he was sent back to the State Department bloody, but unbowed.

That was Larry then, and that was Larry a month ago in the State Department, unimpressed by all of the pomp and circumstance, unafraid to put forth an unpopular opinion if he was convinced he was right. And often, as with the Bay of Pigs and on many other occasions, he was right. Listening to Secretary Eagleburger tell stories at the State Department last month was not only a treat for the young Foreign Service officers, but for all the rest of us. It was thrilling to hear him, and it meant so much to those young men and women. And just watching them hang on his every word was worth it to me. Because to them, Larry was kind of a demigod, although I’m sure he would take issue with the prefix – (laughter) – the only FSO ever to serve as Secretary.

It takes a special commitment to join the Foreign Service, a willingness to live and work in far-off places, to learn languages like Serbo-Croatian, and it’s a commitment not only by officers, but by their families. And I’m very grateful to Larry’s family for their support during his long service to our country. He served in difficult places, including the former Yugoslavia, he served in tumultuous times, and he constantly raised the bar for everyone else. Through it all, he served with integrity. He was devoted to the State Department and believed that his devotion meant being honest, both about its strengths and its weaknesses. And he pushed everyone – his staff, his superiors, the entire bureaucracy – to be better, more effective and more strategic.

Now, the State Department is called “the building,” and it seems to have a life of its own. It’s like this creature from somewhere that is never tamed and can only be slightly known, understood, and occasionally managed. But for Larry, he loved every part of it, but he always expected more than people even thought they were capable of delivering.

And he wasn’t always, even as America’s top diplomat, very diplomatic. When as Deputy Secretary, he saw his renovated office for the first time, he said he thought it looked like a Moroccan whorehouse. (Laughter.) And that comment prompted a complaint from the Moroccan ambassador. (Laughter.) I was also told about that trip to Israel when President Bush sent him. He and the other members of the American delegation there in 1991 were told that they would be participating in a drill, and they would all have to wear gas masks. Now of course, you know the story. Everyone dutifully put on his or her gas mask except Larry. He lit a cigarette instead. (Laughter.) And when his colleagues protested, he pointed out they could not claim that the smoke was bothering them with their gas masks on. (Laughter.)

So Larry was by no means a typical diplomat. And in a Department that is certainly in a town that can be preoccupied with protocol and hierarchy, he didn’t have much use for either. And as anyone who enjoyed a conversation with him knows, he could be, shall we say, somewhat profane, but always funny and always clear about what it is we were trying to achieve together.

I also heard stories that day about his kindness to everyone who worked around him. Once at the end of a long day of official travel in Vienna, he stopped to chat with the people staffing the control room, which was his custom. He told some jokes, he made conversation, and then he headed off for bed. And as he left, a young woman turned to Larry’s staff and said, “When they sent me over here, they said I would never see anyone important, but that was the Deputy Secretary of State.”

He knew those small gestures of friendship meant the world to FSOs and civil servants because he’d been there. He didn’t parachute in from somewhere else; he worked his way up to all the positions that we have now described him as holding. And he knew that the work that people like those of us who have had the privilege of speaking today do can only succeed because of the talents of those around us who are doing the constant backup work and the support that makes it possible for the rest of us to make that speech, to attend that negotiation, to go to that conference. And so for this and all other reasons, he was the pride of the State Department.

And to Larry’s sons and daughters-in-law and grandchildren, thank you for sharing this great and good man with all the rest of us. And thanks, too, to your mother and grandmother, Marlene as well. She’s remembered with great fondness at the State Department for being a warm and wonderful partner to Larry throughout his years at State and, on a personal note, for wearing pantsuits. (Laughter.) Last month, when it came time for Larry to finish his remarks at the State Department, he did so in typical fashion, saying, “Someone just said that 50 years from now, the work of the Ops center will continue. Well, I don’t know how he or anybody else would know that because none of us will be around then.” Everyone burst out laughing, and then he said, “Thank you, and God bless you,” and went on his way.

Fifty years from now, many of us will no longer be here, but at the State Department, I am confident people will still be telling stories about Lawrence Eagleburger – the Foreign Service officer who rose all the way to the seventh floor as Secretary of State, the diplomat who helped presidents and secretaries and America lead through times of crisis, the man who traveled with briefcases full of cartons of cigarettes, who always made time to talk with the junior officers. His time as Secretary was brief, but his service was long, and his impact will endure.

Thank you, Secretary Eagleburger, and God bless you.

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