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Archive for the ‘2017’ Category

The true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most vulnerable members - Mahatma Gandhi

There is a reason why, when you visit Hillary Clinton’s Twitter account, this is the tweet pinned to the top. It has been pinned there for a year and two days as of this writing.

The entertainment industry is rife with allegations of routine sexual assault almost as a matter of business. Both men and women are standing up with accounts of past abuses. Action has been swift and uncompromising.

At the heart of government, however, there remains the habit of “if true.”  We will take down a TV president for sexual assault, but not a declared candidate.

There was this.

washingtonpost.com

Woman says Roy Moore initiated sexual encounter when she was 14, he was 32

By Stephanie McCrummen, Beth Reinhard and Alice Crites


Leigh Corfman, left, in a photo from 1979, when she was about 14. At right, from top, Wendy Miller around age 16, Debbie Wesson Gibson around age 17 and Gloria Thacker Deason around age 18. (Family photos)

Leigh Corfman says she was 14 years old when an older man approached her outside a courtroom in Etowah County, Ala. She was sitting on a wooden bench with her mother, they both recall, when the man introduced himself as Roy Moore.

It was early 1979 and Moore — now the Republican nominee in Alabama for a U.S. Senate seat — was a 32-year-old assistant district attorney. He struck up a conversation, Corfman and her mother say, and offered to watch the girl while her mother went inside for a child custody hearing.

“He said, ‘Oh, you don’t want her to go in there and hear all that. I’ll stay out here with her,’ ” says Corfman’s mother, Nancy Wells, 71. “I thought, how nice for him to want to take care of my little girl.”

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Sundry Republicans, many from Roy Moore’s home state, went on cable in his defense this week. Needless to say, the defenses were pathetic. Attempts to philosophize the allegations range from laughable to blasphemous. Please spare us, you guys. You are embarrassing yourselves!

Let’s take a look at the Democrat running against Roy Moore.



From left, Denise McNair, 11; Carole Robertson, 14; Addie Mae Collins, 14, and Cynthia Dianne Wesley, 14, were killed Sept. 15, 1963, when a bomb exploded at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. (AP)

The case haunted Birmingham for years. Four black girls in Alabama had been killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church — a crime that shocked the country and helped fuel the civil rights movement.

Yet the men responsible — members of the Ku Klux Klan who’d boasted about their role — were never tried and convicted. That changed in 1977 when Robert “Dynamite Bob” Chambliss, the suspected ringleader of the bombing, was put on trial.

At the time, Doug Jones, now a Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate in a hotly contested race Alabama, was a second-year law student. He skipped classes to sit in on the trial, watching in amazement as William Joseph Baxley II, then U.S. attorney in Alabama, presented evidence against Chambliss.

Baxley had received death threats from white supremacists, including an ugly letter from KKK Grand Dragon Edward R. Fields. Baxley responded with a one-sentence missive typed on official stationery: “Dear Dr. Fields, my response to your letter of February 19, 1976, is kiss my ass. Sincerely, Bill Baxley, Attorney General.”

As Jones watched the testimony  in the Jefferson County Courthouse, it became clear that Chambliss did not act alone in the bombing. The four girls killed — 11-year-old Denise McNair and 14-year-olds Carole Robertson, Addie Mae Collins and Cynthia Wesley — had been in the church basement preparing for Sunday service. Addie Mae’s sister, Sarah Jean Collins, who was 12 then, lost an eye in the explosion.

“As I gave my undivided attention to Baxley’s powerful closing argument,” Jones told a House crime subcommittee two decades later, “I never in my wildest imagination dreamed that one day this case and my legal career would come full circle, giving me the opportunity, some 24 years later to prosecute the two remaining suspects for a crime that many say changed the course of history.”

More than 20 years after Chambliss was convicted, Jones would become U.S. attorney in Alabama and set out to finish what Baxley started. He brought charges against two more Klan members, Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr., and Bobby Frank Cherry. The prosecutions have helped make him a contender in his Senate race against Republican Roy Moore, a controversial former judge. On Thursday, Moore was accused by a woman of initiating a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 and he was 32 — allegations he called “completely false” and his campaign dismissed as “the very definition of fake news.”

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I remember that bombing and had traveled enough in the Jim Crow South by then to know that I had met little girls just like these four. Both Condoleeza Rice and Angela Davis knew these little girls. For many of us, these four deaths hit with a sickening thud. Much like the Sandy Hook deaths, these children’s murders said we were not protecting our must vulnerable.

When an industry can take strong steps in the face of assaults on the most trusting and vulnerable and government makes excuses, e.g. the ballots are printed, have gone out, folks have voted early … there must be questions.

This is a special election for pete’s sake! It cannot be rescheduled? You cannot find a more honorable candidate and replace this child molester?

Apparently the answer to all of that is no.

I suggest: perhaps instead of a negative campaign against Roy Moore, child molester,  a positive campaign in favor of Doug Jones, child defender, might be in order.

This is the last big 2017 election before mid-terms. Maybe we win by emphasizing being on the right side, against the domestic terrorist organization, for that is what the Klan is, that killed little girls in their church.

There is a plethora of evidence and opinion against the bad guy. We should be pushing the creds of the good guy who took up a case so cold that he himself did not remember the incident and brought the bad guys to justice.

This is for all the little girls because you matter. As Hillary says, “…you are valuable and powerful & deserving of every chance & opportunity in the world.”

I pray that Alabamans will vote for the man who held those four lives in esteem high enough to cause him to go after their killers many years past than for the guy who sends his friends on TV to giggle to Jake Tapper about how silly it is to believe what little girls remember even when they are grown … and Republican.

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Hillary Clinton and Onward Together have every reason to celebrate last night’s election results along with all Democrats. If you supported Onward Together, you heard from her today. If you haven’t supported them yet, perhaps you want to consider it. The Big Blue Wave began last night. Let’s keep it going all the way through this year. 2018 is just around the corner now.  Look for Hillary with Seth Meyers on Late Night tonight!

Last night, we were reminded what is possible when we come together and fight for what we believe in.

With the support of Onward Together, 40% of the candidates that Run for Something endorsed and supported won their races in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and more — compared to the 10% rate at which first-time candidates usually win. 86 women trained by Emerge America won last night, including nine of the seats flipped in Virginia. Color of Change PAC was instrumental in winning the district attorney race in Philadelphia. And Indivisible groups made more than 600,000 calls into Virginia to help pull out a win for Ralph Northam, Justin Fairfax, and Mark Herring.

This year hasn’t been what any of us had hoped it would be. In fact, it’s been frustrating and, at times, painful. But we never lost faith in our vision of an America where our children and grandchildren can grow up safe and loved, and with every opportunity they deserve.

To those of you who worked your hearts out for these victories, including our friends on the ground in Virginia, New Jersey, and more: thank you. I am so proud to be on your team.

As we celebrate today, we also have to remember the work ahead of us. The groups that Onward Together supports — including Swing Left, which is focused on taking back the House — have been making incredible progress in the fight for 2018 and beyond. We saw again last night that we are at our strongest when we stand together.

Take a moment to celebrate, then consider donating $25 to Onward Together to support this work in the months and years ahead — we really need you now more than ever.

Onward!

Hillary

Thank Hillary for her hard work and leadership on Twitter! #ThankYouHillary is TRENDING!!!!

 

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Victories tonight in New Jersey and Virginia are the shot in the arm Democrats needed. Yes, we can still do it because when Democrats vote, we win! So I opened the bottle of champagne that has been on ice for a year. Have a glass! To us all – to everyone who worked hard to GOTV and to all who went out in the crummy weather, stood on line, and cast a ballot.

 

Here are the thank-you notes from the governors-elect of Virginia, Ralph Northam and New Jersey, Phil Murphy.

We could not have done this without you.

Today, Virginians proved that we won’t be divided, we won’t be torn apart, and we won’t sit idly by. We will speak out against divisiveness, hatred, and bigotry in all its forms, and we will fight for Virginia values.

I am so proud of this team, so proud of the work you have done, and so honored to have earned your trust, your vote, and to serve you as the 73rd governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Thank you for believing in this campaign—for digging deep and giving whatever you could, for investing your time, your money, and your heart in getting us to this moment. We put a ton of miles on the Sequoia as we traveled across the commonwealth the past few months. I saw the incredible work you did everywhere we went, from Fredericksburg to Fairfax, and Onancock to Roanoke—you showed the entire country what Virginians stand for and what it means to run an inclusive and forward-looking campaign.

I got into this race to make a difference for all Virginians, and you’ve been with me every step of the way. Folks were ready to get involved, knock doors, make phone calls, and talk to their neighbors about the values that matter most to us as Virginians. And for that, I will always be grateful.

Together we’ll keep making progress for Virginia families every single day.

Tomorrow, the hard work of governing begins, so let’s get to work.

—Ralph


I want to thank you.

I’m truly honored and humbled to be the next Governor of New Jersey, especially knowing you are the reason why I am here.

When we started this journey together 18 months ago, I never could have imagined how many of you would volunteer your time, chip in whatever you could afford, and sacrifice so much for this shared victory. And I truly cannot thank you enough for your support, and your conviction.

Without you, this would not have been possible. You helped send a message that we are united — and that together we’ll end the failed status quo in Trenton by creating a stronger, fairer economy that works for every New Jersey family.

So, now it is time to get to work. Together, we can do this. I believe in you and all the people living in our great state — and I promise I’ll always have your back.

Thank you,

Phil

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The Christopher Steele memos are not going away.


Nine months after its first appearance, the set of intelligence reports known as the Steele dossier, one of the most explosive documents in modern political history, is still hanging over Washington, casting a shadow over the Trump administration that has only grown darker as time has gone by.

It was reported this week that the document’s author, former British intelligence official, Christopher Steele, has been interviewed by investigators working for the special counsel on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

The Senate and House intelligence committees are, meanwhile, asking to see Steele to make up their own mind about his findings. The ranking Democrat on the House committee, Adam Schiff, said that the dossier was “a very important and useful guide to help us figure out what we need to look into”.

The fact that Steele’s reports are being taken seriously after lengthy scrutiny by federal and congressional investigators has far-reaching implications.

SNIP

The Steele dossier said one of the aims of the Russian influence campaign was to peel off voters who had supported Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primaries and nudge them towards Trump.

Evidence has since emerged that Russians and eastern Europeans posing as Americans targeted Sanders supporters with divisive and anti-Clinton messages in the summer of 2016, after the primaries were over.

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Regarding that last sentence, what are we to make of this? It was posted yesterday by an eastern European who poses as an American, refuses to disclose nationality and location to “friends” on Facebook, and boasted privately to me about “reach.” Who uses that word? And why? Especially when you are talking American politics to Americans!

Political survey: Q1: Who is our champion for 2020? Q2: WHY HILLARY?… I do not want to influence you, but …

Of course American friends ate this up despite HRC having stated quite publicly several times that she has run her last campaign and is moving forward on a new footing. As to that “I do not want to influence you…” portion, I refer you to George Lakoff’s Don’t Think of an Elephant.

Absolutely! Yes you do! This is bald-faced influence peddling.

Why would a foreigner purportedly worshipful of Hillary contradict Hillary’s own words regularly with the ubiquitous #Hillary2020 hashtag?

Though this be madness yet there is method in it‘.

Yes indeedy!

To paraphrase Mammy in “Gone With the Wind,” trolls of this ilk are sitting there waiting to pounce just like a tiger when the time is right.

At Stanford, Hillary said,

“Make no mistake this isn’t just about what happened in 2016, it’s about what is happening right now”

Yep! And the trolls come in all manner of guises – but they are disguises. Be wary!

She has warned us in the past. Too many ignored and disregarded her, and look where we are.

Image result for hillary clinton stanford

 

 

 

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Rebecca Traister was recently given unusually extended access to Hillary, interviewing her over a period of months this Spring and ending just this morning at Wellesley.  This profile is set for the May 29 issue of New York Magazine. It’s a hefty weekend read. There might be tears. Just saying.

Hillary Clinton Is Furious. And Resigned. And Funny. And Worried.

The surreal post-election life of the woman who would have been president.

By

Photographs by Lynsey Addario

Hillary backstage at a speech in May.

  2:36 pm

When I walk into the Chappaqua dining room in which Hillary Clinton is spending her days working on her new book, I am greeted by a vision from the past. Wearing no makeup and giant Coke-bottle glasses, dressed in a gray mock-turtleneck and black zip sweatshirt, Hillary looks less Clinton and more Rodham than I have ever seen her outside of college photographs. It’s the glasses, probably, that work to make her face look rounder, or maybe just the bareness of her skin. She looks not like the woman who’s familiar from television, from newspapers, from America of the past 25 years, but like the 69-year-old version of the young woman who came to the national stage with a wackadoodle Wellesley commencement speech in 1969. With no more races to run and no more voters to woo with fancy hair, Clinton appears now as she might have if she’d aged in nature and not in the crucible of American politics. Still, this is not Hillary of the woods. She is reemerging, giving speeches and interviews. It’s clear that she is making an active choice to remain a public figure.

It’s the day after Donald Trump has fired FBI director James Comey, the man who many — including Clinton — believe is responsible for the fact that she is spending this Wednesday in May working at a dining-room table in Chappaqua and not in the Oval Office. Clinton checks with her communications director, Nick Merrill, about what’s happened in the past hour — she’s been exercising — and listens to the barrage of updates, nodding like a person whose job requires her to be up-to-date on what’s happening, even though it does not.

“I am less surprised than I am worried,” she says of the Comey firing. “Not that he shouldn’t have been disciplined. And certainly the Trump campaign relished everything that was done to me in July and then particularly in October.” But “having said that, I think what’s going on now is an effort to derail and bury the Russia inquiry, and I think that’s terrible for our country.”

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Hillary returned to Wellesley today to send off the class of 2017 with a rousing commencement speech replete with reminiscences and hope for the future. She was funny, wise, and full of encouragement. Look for Hillary around the 51 minute mark.

 

 

Thank you so much for that warm welcome. I am happy to be back here at Wellesley, especially for President Johnson’s first commencement and to thank her, the trustees, families and friends, faculty, staff, and guests for understanding and perpetuating the importance of this college. What it stands for, what it has meant and what it will do in the years ahead. And most importantly, it’s wonderful to be here with another green class to say congratulations to the class of 2017.

Now, I have some of my dear friends here from my class. A green class of 1969. And I assume or at least you can tell me later unlike us, you actually have a class cheer. 1969 Wellesley. Yet another year with no class cheer. But it is such an honor to join with the college and all who have come to celebrate this day with you and to recognize the amazing futures that await you. You know, four years ago maybe a little more or less for some of you.

Just a minute. I’ve got to get a lozenge. Thank you. I told the trustees I was sitting with after hearing Paula’s speech I didn’t think I could get through it. So we’ll blame allergy instead of emotion.

But you know, you arrived at this campus, you arrived from all over. You joined students from 49 states and 58 countries. Now, maybe you felt like you belonged right away. I doubt it. But maybe some of you did and you’ve never wavered. But maybe you changed your major three times and your hair style twice as many as that. Or maybe after your first month of classes you made a frantic collect call—ask your parents what that was—back to Illinois to tell your mother and father you weren’t smart enough to be here.

My father said okay, come home. My mother said you have to stick it out. That’s what happened to me. But whatever your path, you dream big. You probably in true Wellesley fashion planned your academic and extracurricular schedule right down to the minute. So this day that you’re been waiting for and maybe dreading a little is finally here. As President Johnson said, I spoke at my commencement 48 years ago. I came back 25 years ago to speak at another commencement. I couldn’t think of any place I’d rather be this year than right here.

You may have heard that things didn’t exactly go the way I planned. But you know what? I’m doing okay. I’ve gotten to spend time with my family, especially my amazing grandchildren. I was going to give the entire commencement speech about them but was talked out of it.

Long walks in the woods. Organizing my closets, right? I won’t lie. Chardonnay helped a little too. Here’s what helped most of all. Remembering who I am, where I come from, and what I believe. And that is what Wellesley means to me. This college gave me so much. It launched me on a life of service and provided friends that I still treasure. So wherever your life takes you, I hope that Wellesley serves as that kind of touchstone for you.

Now, if any of you are nervous about what you’ll be walking into when you leave the campus, I know that feeling. I do remember my commencement. I’ve been asked by my classmates to speak. I stayed up all night with my friends, the third floor of Davis. Writing and editing the speech. By the time we gathered in the academic quad, I was exhausted. My hair was a wreck. The mortar board made it even worse. But I was pretty oblivious to all of that, because what my friend his asked me to do was to talk about our worries and about our ability and responsibility to do something about them. We didn’t trust government, authority figures, or really anyone over 30.

In large part, thanks to years of heavy casualties and statements about Vietnam and deep differences over civil rights and poverty here at home. We were asking urgent questions about whether women, people of color, religious minorities, immigrants would ever be treated with dignity and respect. And by the way, we were furious about the past presidential election of a man whose presidency would eventually end in disgrace with his impeachment for obstruction of justice. After firing the person running the investigation into him at the department of justice.

But here’s what I want you to know. We got through that tumultuous time and once again we began to thrive as our society changed laws and opened the circle of opportunity and rights wider and wider for more Americans. We revved up the engines of imagination. We turned back a tide of intolerance and embraced inclusion. The we who did those things were more than those in power who wanted to change course. It was millions of ordinary citizens, especially young people who voted, marched and organized. Now, of course today has some important differences.

The advance of technology, the impact of the Internet, our fragmented media landscape, make it easier than ever to splinter ourselves into echo chambers. We can shut out contrary voices, avoid ever questioning our basic assumptions. Extreme views are given powerful microphones. Leaders willing to exploit fear and skepticism have tools at their disposal that were unimaginable when I graduated.

And here’s what that means to you, the class of 2017. You are graduating at a time when there is a full-fledged assault on truth and reason. Just log on to social media for ten seconds. It will hit you right in the face. People denying science, concocting elaborate, hurtful conspiracies theories about child abuse rings operating out of pizza parlors. Drumming up rampant fear about undocumented immigrants, Muslims, minorities, the poor. Turning neighbor against neighbor and sowing division at a time when we desperately need unity. Some are even denying things we see with our own eyes. Like the size of crowds.

And then defending themselves by talking about “alternative facts.” But this is serious business. Look at the budget that was just proposed in Washington. It is an attack of unimaginable cruelty on the most vulnerable among us, the youngest, the oldest, the poorest, and hardworking people who need a little help to gain or hang on to a decent middle-class life. It grossly underfunds public education, mental health, and efforts even to combat the opioid epidemic. And in reversing our commitment to fight climate change, it puts the future of our nation and our world at risk.

And to top it off, it is shrouded in a trillion-dollar mathematical lie. Let’s call it what it is. It’s a con. They don’t even try to hide it. Why does all this matter? It matters because if our leaders lie about the problems we face, we’ll never solve them. It matters because it undermines confidence in government as a whole which in turn breeds more cynicism and anger. But it also matters because our country, like this college, was founded on the principles of the enlightenment. In particular, the belief that people, you and I, possess the capacity for reason and critical thinking. And that free and open debate is the life blood of a democracy.

Not only Wellesley, but the entire American university system, the envy of the world, was founded on those fundamental ideals. We should not abandon them. We should revere them. We should aspire to them every single day in everything we do.

And there’s something else. As the history majors among you here today know all too well, when people in power invent their own facts and attack those who question them, it can mark the beginning of the end of a free society.

That is not hyperbole. It is what authoritarian regimes throughout history have done. They attempt to control reality. Not just our laws and our rights and our budgets, but our thoughts and beliefs. Right now some of you might wonder well, why am I telling you all this? You don’t own a cable news network. You don’t control the Facebook algorithm. You aren’t a member of congress. Yet.

Because I believe with all my heart that the future of America, indeed the future of the world, depends on brave, thoughtful people like you insisting on truth and integrity right now every day. You didn’t create these circumstances but you have the power to change them.

Vaclav Havel, the playwright, the first president of the Czech Republic, wrote an essay called “The Power of the Powerless.” And in it he said, the moment someone breaks through in one place, when one person cries out, the emperor is naked. When a single person breaks the rules of the game thus exposing it as a game, everything suddenly appears in another light.

What he’s telling us is if you feel powerless, don’t. Don’t let anyone tell you your voice doesn’t matter. In the years to come, there will be trolls galore online and in person. Eager to tell you that you don’t have anything worthwhile to say or anything meaningful to contribute. They may even call you a nasty woman. Some may take a slightly more sophisticated approach and say your elite education means you are out of teach with real people. In other words, sit down and shut up. Now, in my experience, that’s the last thing you should ever tell a Wellesley graduate.

And here’s the good news. What you’ve learned these four years is precisely what you need to face the challenges of this moment. First, you learned critical thinking. I can still remember the professors who challenged me to make decisions with good information, rigorous reasoning, real deliberation. I know we didn’t have much of that in this past election, but we have to get back to it.

After all, in the words of my predecessor in the Senate, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, everyone is entitled to his own opinion but not his own facts. And your education gives you more than knowledge. It gives you the power to keep learning and apply what you know to improve your life and the lives of others. Because you are beginning your careers with one of the best educations in the world, I think you do have a special responsibility to give others the chance to learn and think for themselves and to learn from them so that we can have the kind of open fact-based debate necessary for our democracy to survive and flourish. And along the way, you may be convinced to change your mind from time to time. You know what? That’s okay. Take it from me, the former president of the Wellesley College Young Republicans.

Second, you learn the value of an open mind and an open society. At their best, our colleges and universities are free marketplaces of ideas. Embracing a diversity of perspectives and backgrounds. That’s our country at our best, too. An open, inclusive, diverse society is the opposite of an anecdote to a closed society where there is only one right way to think, believe, and act.

Here at Wellesley you’ve worked hard to turn this ideal into a reality. You’ve spoken out against racism and sexism and discrimination of all kinds and you’ve shared your own stories and at times that’s taken courage. But the only way our society will ever become a place where everyone truly belongs is if all of us speak openly and honestly about who we are, what we’re going through. So keep doing that. And let me add that your learning, listening and serving should include people who don’t agree with you politically. A lot of our fellow Americans have lost faith in the existing economic, social, political, and cultural conditions of our country. Many feel left behind, left out, looked down on.

Their anger and alienation has proved a fertile ground for false promises and information. It must be addressed or they will continue to sign up to be foot soldiers in the ongoing conflict between us and them. The opportunity is here. Millions of people will be hurt by the policies, including this budget that is being considered. And many of those same people don’t want dreamers deported or health care taken away. Many don’t want to retreat on civil rights, women’s rights and LGBT rights. So if your outreach is rebuffed, keep trying. Do the right thing anyway. We’re going to share this future. Better do so with open hearts and outstretched hands than closed minds and clenched fists.

Here at Wellesley you learned the power of service. Because while free and fierce conversations in classrooms, dorm rooms, dining halls are vital. They only get us so far. You have to turn those ideas and those values into action. This college has always understood that. The motto which you’ve heard twice already not to be ministered unto but to minister is as true today as it ever was. You think about it, it’s kind of an old-fashioned rendering of President Kennedy’s great statement. Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country.

Not long ago I got a note from a group of Wellesley alums and students who had supported me in the campaign. They worked their hearts out and like a lot of people they’re wondering what do we do now? Well, I think there’s only one answer. Keep going. Don’t be afraid of your ambition, of your dreams, or even your anger. Those are powerful forces. But harness them to make a difference in the world. Stand up for truth and reason. Do it in private, in conversations with your family, your friends, your workplace, your neighborhoods, and do it in public. In media posts, on social media, or grab a sign and head to a protest. Make defending truth and a free society a core value of your life every single day.

So wherever you wind up next, the minute you get there, register to vote. And while you’re at it, encourage others to do so. And then vote in every election. Not just the presidential ones. Bring others to vote. Fight every effort to restrict the right of law abiding citizens to be able to vote as well.

Get involved in a cause that matters to you. Pick one. Start somewhere. You don’t have to do everything. But don’t sit on the sidelines. And you know what? Get to know your elected officials. If you disagree with them, ask questions. Challenge them. Better yet, run for office yourself someday.

Now, that’s not for everybody. I know. And it’s certainly not for the faint of heart, but it’s worth it. As they say in one of my favorite movies, A League of Their Own, it’s supposed to be hard. The hard is what makes it great.

As Paula said, the day after the election, I did want to speak, particularly to women and girls everywhere, especially young women. Because you are valuable. And powerful. And deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world. Not just your future, but our future depends on you believing that. We need your smarts, of course. But we also need your compassion. Your curiosity. Your stubbornness. And remember, you are even more powerful because you have so many people supporting you, cheering you on, standing with you through good times and bad.

You know, our culture often celebrates people who appear to go it alone. But the truth is that’s not how life works. Anything worth doing takes a village. And you build that village by investing love and time into your relationships. And in those moments, for whatever reason, when it might feel bleak, think back to this place where women have the freedom to take risks, make mistakes, even fail in front of each other. Channel the strength of your Wellesley classmates and experiences. I guarantee you it will help you stand up a little straighter, feel a little braver, knowing that the things you joked about and even took for granted can be your secret weapons for your future. One of the things that gave me the most hope and joy after the election, when I really needed it, was meeting so many young people who told me that my defeat had not defeated them.

And I’m going to devote a lot of my future to helping you make your mark in the world. I created a new organization called onward together to help recruit and train future leaders, organize for real and lasting change. The work never ends. When I graduated and made that speech, I did say, and some of you might have pictures from that day with this on it, the challenge now is to practice politics as the art of making what appears to be impossible possible. That was true then. It’s truer today.

I never could have imagined where I would have been 48 years later. Certainly never that I would have run for the presidency of the United States or seen progress for women in all walks of life over the course of my lifetime. And yes, put millions of more cracks in that highest and hardest glass ceiling. Because just in those years, doors that once seemed sealed to women are now open. They’re ready for you to walk through or charge through. To advance the struggle for equality, justice, and freedom. So whatever your dreams today, dream even bigger. Wherever you have set your sights, raise them even higher. And above all, keep going. Don’t do it because I asked you to. Do it for yourselves. Do it for truth and reason. Do it because the history of Wellesley and this country tells us it’s often during the darkest times when you can do the most good.

Double down on your passions. Be bold. Try. Fail. Try again and lean on each other. Hold on to your values. Never give up on those dreams. I’m have been optimistic about the future. Because I think after we’ve tried a lot of other things, we get back to the business of America. I believe in you with all my heart. I want you to believe in yourselves. So go forth. Be great. But first graduate. Congratulations!

 

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Today’s matinee was sold out because it was the final performance of “The Color Purple” on Broadway. To the surprised delight of the audience, Hillary Clinton was in the house for the send off. She received a sustained standing ovation and brought down the house before the curtain even went up!

Hillary Clinton Credit Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

Hillary Clinton, who has kept a relatively low public profile since losing the presidential election two months ago, on Sunday showed up at the final performance of a revival of “The Color Purple” on Broadway.

Mrs. Clinton received a sustained standing ovation from the sold-out crowd, a response far warmer than the scattered booing and clapping that greeted the arrival of Vice President-elect Mike Pence when he attended “Hamilton,” just one block north, on Nov. 18. Mrs. Clinton was accompanied by her husband, Bill Clinton, and their daughter, Chelsea.

“We love you Hillary,” audience members yelled as they snapped pictures and clapped. Several thanked Mrs Clinton and told her, “God bless you.”

“God bless you,” Mrs. Clinton replied.

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This was an unplanned honor! Hillary will be in Washington DC on Tuesday to be recognized for her State Department leadership at the dedication of a museum named for her.

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