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Archive for the ‘policy speeches’ Category

At a campaign event in Toledo, Ohio today, Hillary delivered a speech addressing broad economic plans contrasting her proposed policies to those of Donald Trump.  Look for Hillary around the 35 minute mark.

In Toledo, Clinton Lays Out Tools for Fighting Corporate Fraud and Abuse, Vows to Create An Economy That Works For Everyone

At a speech in Toledo on Monday, Hillary Clinton outlined her vision for corporate America as a partner in an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. She proposed policy solutions that would promote an economy where our businesses, workers and consumers grow and prosper together. That would be a stark contrast to the approach of Donald Trump, Clinton said, who has taken corporate abuse and excess and made a business model out of it – and who may have avoided paying taxes for nearly two decades, while tens of millions of working families paid theirs. Clinton added, “While millions of American families, including mine and yours, were working hard paying our fair share, it seems he was contributing nothing to our nation. Imagine that. Not fair. Nothing for Pell Grants to help kids go to college. Nothing for veterans. Nothing for our military. And you know, he has been dissing America in this whole campaign. Right? He talks us down. He makes disparaging comments about our country. He calls our military a disaster. Well, it’s not, but it might have been if everybody else had failed to pay taxes to support our brave men and women in uniform.”

As part of her longstanding commitment to promote free and fair competition, Clinton laid out two new policy proposals: curbing the prevalence of fine-print “forced arbitration” clauses in contracts that prevent workers and consumers like Wells Fargo customers from bringing legal action against companies who have harmed them, and a new commitment to promote competition, address excessive market concentration and reinvigorate antitrust laws and enforcement.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello, Toledo. I am – I am very happy to be here today and – I am so grateful to have this chance to talk to you about what we can do together to have the kind of economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top.

I want to acknowledge – we have an overflow crowd in another room, and I know they can hear us, but we’re glad they’re here. I want to thank your Congresswoman, Marcy Kaptur, for her leadership and her grit. I want to thank Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson. And the mayor told me there’s a young man here who just won a boxing championship, Robert Easter. Where’s Robert Easter? There you are, Robert Easter. Congratulations. I know Toledo is proud of you; we all are. I want to thank Kenyetta for that introduction. Do we have any other UAW members here?

It’s a great day to be here in Ohio for a lot of different reasons. One is I am so thrilled that LeBron James has endorsed me and joined our campaign. I know – I’ve gotten a lot of wonderful endorsements over the past year and a half. I’m grateful for each and every one of them. But I got to say, there’s something special about this one. And it’s a real honor in part because of why he chose to endorse me. Now, not everyone knows this. I mean, you all know what an amazing athlete he his – MVP, winner of championships – but he’s also – LeBron is also a dedicated advocate for children. And this afternoon I’ll be in Akron, where he’s done so much for the kids in that community.

It’s a deep, personal commitment that he has that I share with him. We both believe every single child should have the chance to live up to his or her God-given potential. I could not be prouder to have LeBron joining our team as we head into the homestretch.

Now, one thing I know – I’ll just say it because I know it’s for sure – I hope to be elected president, but I know here in Ohio LeBron will always be the King.

I was listening to Kenyetta introduce me, and I really appreciated what she said, because Toledo is the kind of place where people work hard, look after one another, and yes, pay their taxes, right?

You recognize that we all have to do our part because we are all in this together, and it matters.

We believe honest work deserves honest pay. We believe everyone should have the right to join a strong union that will always have your back.

It’s personal for me. I’m the granddaughter of a factory worker from Scranton, Pennsylvania. He went to work in the same lace mill every day for 50 years. He believed he passed it down to my dad, who passed it down to me that if he did what he was supposed to do, he’d have a good life and his kids would have an even better life. That is the American dream. That is what we believe in. That’s what we’ve got to keep going generation after generation.

And because of my grandfather’s hard work, my dad made it to college. And then after serving in the Navy during World War II, he started his own small business, printing fabric for draperies.

As a young girl, I’d sometimes go to his print plant. It was a long building, no natural light, no windows, but he had these long tables where he’d roll out the fabric and then I’d watch him work with silkscreens, if you’ve ever seen that. He would take the silkscreen, he’d put it down, he’d pour the paint in, he’d take the squeegee, go across all the way down to the end of one table, then over to the next table, all the way back. And then if there was a second color to be added, he would do that. He sometimes let me help with the squeegee. That was my favorite part.

And I know he worked really hard. He worked really hard. He believed in hard work. He passed that on to me. He provided a good middle-class life for us. So I am proud to stand with hardworking families all over Toledo, Ohio, and America, who should have the same chance that I did to share in the American Dream, which should be big enough for everybody.

Fighting for kids and families has been the cause of my life, as Kenyetta said, when I went to work for the Children’s Defense Fund all those years ago. And it will be the mission of my presidency, because I want to focus on what are called kitchen table issues, the ones that keep you up at night – like the cost of child care, and college, and prescription drugs, and so much else.

And that means we’ve got to create more good jobs with rising incomes. That means we’ve got to have good schools in every zip code. That means everybody willing to work – and I say that very clearly; you’ve got to be willing to work – and if you’re willing to work, you should be able to get ahead and stay ahead. That is the basic bargain.

Now, I don’t know about you, but you wouldn’t think that the theme of my campaign, ‘getting an economy to work for everyone, not just those at the top’ would be controversial – and yet this is one of the defining debates not just of this election but of our time.

Now, I will say, most American companies – most – are run by honorable, patriotic people who care about their employees and communities. But there are still too many powerful interests fighting to protect their own profits and privileges at the expense of everyone else. [Applause.] And they are aided and abetted by the rules and incentives in our economy who actually encourage people at the top to take advantage of consumers, workers, small businesses, and taxpayers.

That makes it tougher for the well-meaning CEOs to take the high road. And it gets even harder when we don’t aggressively enforce the rules, when we don’t enforce trade rules that allow other countries with lower wages and standards to get an unfair leg up, when we don’t enforce rules on Wall Street, which exerts enormous pressure on publicly traded companies to prioritize boosting share prices in the short term over building real value, investing in workers, plant, and equipment over the longer term.

And let’s be honest, the tax code rewards corporations for outsourcing jobs and their profits overseas instead of investing here in the United States. And it is riddled with loopholes that let the rich get even richer and make income inequality even worse. It tilts the playing field further against small businesses that can’t afford lawyers and lobbyists.

So with all these pressures pushing in the wrong direction, it’s even more important that we have an election about these very issues. Because what I know will happen – if we have an election where we have an agenda that actually would begin to level that playing field, we will rebuild the middle class, we will make work pay, we will create greater opportunities for a great percentage of Americans.

Now, I know how hard this, but I think we are on the cusp, if we win this election, to be able to get these things done, right?”

AUDIENCE: “Yeah.”

HILLARY CLINTON: “That means pursuing reforms that unleash the enormous positive potential of the American private sector. We’ve got unmatched talent, innovation, entrepreneurial spirit.

So when we work together, we can all benefit.

Now, I believe corporations that benefit from everything America has to offer should feel some sense of responsibility not just to their biggest shareholders – but to their workers, to their customers, to their communities, and yes, to our country, to the United States of America. We have been moving off track for decades. I don’t need to tell you that. You know it, you’ve lived it, you’ve seen it. But it is time to get back on track.

And you can ask anybody who’s ever worked for me or worked with me, who’s ever served with me, when I tell you I’m going to try to do something, I will get up every single day and work my heart out for you.

So let’s begin by making it clear that for most businesses, America is the most important asset on their balance sheet. This country of ours, this system of ours, the rule of law, the opportunity to get an education and go as far as your hard work and ambition will take you. And we created the biggest engine of economic growth in the world, the American middle class. So when we middle class thrives, the country thrives. And when it doesn’t, we don’t, right?

And I’m going to use the White House and every tool at my disposal as your president to make the case that patriotism is profitable. Standing up for America, investing in America will pay off.

Now, we have always had innovators and entrepreneurs who build great companies and create real value. But we should not and we will not respect those who get rich by cheating everybody else.

So today I want to send a clear message to every boardroom, every executive suite across America: If you scam your customers, exploit your employees, pollute our environment, or rip off taxpayers, we will find ways to hold you accountable.

But on the other side – on the other side, if you do the right thing and you invest in your workers and your communities and our country’s future, we will stand with you. That is the choice. Our goal is to make it easier for everyone to do better.

Now, to understand why this is so important, consider the recent examples we’ve seen of egregious corporate behavior.

Look at Wells Fargo. Really shocking, isn’t it? One of the nation’s biggest banks bullying thousands of employees into committing fraud against unsuspecting customers, secretly opening up millions of accounts for people without their consent, even their knowledge, misusing personal information, and then sticking customers with hidden fees. It is outrageous that eight years after a cowboy culture on Wall Street wrecked our economy, we are still seeing powerful bankers playing fast and loose with the law.

And then in a category by himself, there’s Donald Trump. Well, you may have heard that he has long refused to release his tax returns the way every other nominee for president has done for decades. You can look at 40 years of my tax returns. I think we need a law that says if you become the nominee of the major parties, you have to release your tax returns.

Now, a lot of us were wondering, what is he hiding? It must be really terrible. Well, The New York Times has discovered at least part of the answer. Back in the 1990s, Trump apparently lost a billion dollars in a single year on bad investments and failing casinos. Now, how anybody can lose a dollar, let alone a billion dollars, in the casino industry is kind of beyond me. It’s just hard to figure. But as a result, it doesn’t look like he paid a dime of federal income tax for almost two decades.

Now, while millions of American families, including mine and yours, were working hard paying our fair share, it seems he was contributing nothing to our nation. Imagine that. Not fair. Nothing for Pell Grants to help kids go to college. Nothing for veterans. Nothing for our military. And you know, he has been dissing America in this whole campaign. Right? He talks us down. He makes disparaging comments about our country. He calls our military a disaster. Well, it’s not, but it might have been if everybody else had failed to pay taxes to support our brave men and women in uniform.

I saw a newspaper article. A gentleman named Steve Crouse, who owns the Glass City Café here in Toledo, summed it up pretty well in this article. He said, ‘I would feel guilty if I didn’t pay anything. It’s flat-out cheating the government.’ Now, my friend Bernie Sanders was right yesterday when he said Trump reflects a distorted view of the American people and what this country is all about.

Trump represents the same rigged system that he claims he’s going to change. The whole story tells us everything we need to know about how Trump does business. After he made all those bad bets and lost all that money, he didn’t lift a finger to help and protect his employees, or all the small businesses and contractors he’d hired, or the people of Atlantic City. They all got hammered while he was busy with his accountants trying to figure out how he could keep living like a billionaire. And all the while he was using his political connections to collect hundreds of millions of dollars in government subsidies and extra tax breaks for his companies. In other words, Trump was taking from America with both hands and leaving the rest of us with the bill.

Now, he says that he’s the one who can fix things, but that is like letting the fox guard the henhouse. Right? And here’s what I really am just stunned by. I get stunned every day in this campaign. But here’s one of the many things that I’m stunned by. He has put forth a tax plan that would cut his own taxes even more. It would be like you’re paying zero. You expect us to pay you to stay in business, all the rest of us in America? He’d open the loopholes even wider. And according to a new independent study, he would actually – listen to this, people, because this is a real shocker – his plan would actually raise taxes for millions of middle class families. And you know the people it would hit the hardest? Are single parents, whose lives and challenges he doesn’t care about, certainly doesn’t understand.

Now, many have likely already spent years paying more than he did, and he now would make that even worse. And what does he say about it? Well, did you all see the debate last Monday? Well, in the debate – in the debate – well, then you all know that in the debate he said it was smart to avoid paying taxes. Yesterday his campaign was bragging it makes him a genius. Here’s my question: What kind of genius loses a billion dollars in a single year?

This is Trump to a T. He’s taken corporate excess and makes a business model out of it. He abuses his power, games the system, puts his own interests ahead of the country’s. It’s Trump first and everyone else last. And there are lots of principled, law-abiding business leaders out there who are horrified by all of this. Not a single – not a single CEO of a Fortune 100 company supports Trump’s campaign. Think about it. I’ve been endorsed by very successful people – Warren Buffett, Mike Bloomberg, Mark Cuban. I loved what Mark Cuban said when he endorsed me. He said, ‘Look, I’ve been successful.’ He actually is a real billionaire. And you know what? He used profit-sharing to help his employees, not bankruptcy to fire people. And when he sold his first company, he shared the profits with his employees, and 300 of them became millionaires. That’s the kind of business practices I want to see more of in our country.

But here’s what we’ve got to do. Even if Trump is like one of a kind, we’ve got to reverse the broader trends he represents. It’s time to rewrite the rules and make this economy fair for everyone. And today I want to briefly share with you my plan for protecting taxpayers, consumers, small businesses, and workers. We’re going to crack down on the worst corporate abuses and empower companies willing to take the high road and invest in good jobs, in higher wages, and in stronger communities.

First let’s start with protecting taxpayers and making sure we have more fairness in the system. It is wrong that corporations and the super-wealthy play by a different set of rules. A Wall Street money manager should not be able to pay a lower tax rate than a teacher or a nurse. And I’ll tell you something else. Our largest companies should not be able to get away with paying hardly anything at all. It is insulting when they engage in these games, like moving their headquarters over to a foreign country – on paper, not in reality – just to take advantage of lower tax rates. And it is infuriating when they take tax breaks with one hand and give out pink slips in America with the other hand.

So here’s what we’re going to do. We’re going to close those loopholes. I’ve got a list of them we’re going after. We’re going to make Wall Street corporations and the super-rich start paying their fair share of taxes. We’re going to pass something called the Buffett rule, which means multimillionaires cannot lower rates than their secretaries and other people working for them. We’re going to put in place a new exit tax. If companies try to leave our country to avoid paying their fair share, if they try to outsource jobs, they’re going to have to give back every tax break they ever received in our country. And then we’re going to put that money to work creating opportunities here in America.

Second, we’re going to protect consumers. No American should ever be taken advantage of, like thousands were, by Wells Fargo. And this isn’t a new fight for me. As a Senator, I raised the alarm about subprime mortgages. I fought to hold reckless managers accountable for toxic toys and household products that threaten our kids. I introduced legislation to protect Americans’ personal data and combat identity theft. So as president, I will make consumer protection a top priority across the entire government.

And that starts by defending and empowering the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was created after the financial crisis. And the principal person who got it created was Senator Elizabeth Warren. And under the leadership of Ohio’s Rich Cordray, the agency has already returned more than $11 billion to more than 15 million Americans who were ripped off by predatory lenders, credit card companies, and others. And it is the one making sure that the defrauded Wells Fargo customers get their money back.

Now, I got to say I am so proud of what this new agency has done. Sometimes people say, well, what does the government really do? Well, there’s a lot of examples, but this is a primary one, standing up and making sure consumers get paid back when they are ripped off. And because of its success, Republicans in Congress keep trying to shut it down. And Donald Trump agrees with them. In fact, he wants to scrap all the tough new rules imposed on Wall Street after the crisis. Well, not on my watch, Donald. We’re never going to let that happen.

Now, instead of gutting consumer protection, we should be expanding it. And we should build on the Dodd-Frank financial reforms and go even further because Wall Street can never, ever be permitted to threaten Main Street again. And the Wells Fargo scandal sheds light on another threat to consumers that we have to address. When the scam’s victims, people like you and me, who had accounts there tried to sue, they were shocked to learn there was a provision in the very fine print of their contracts that kept them from going to court to sue the bank for being cheated. Instead, they are forced into a closed-door arbitration process without the important protections that you get in a court of law. We are not going to let corporations like Wells Fargo use these fine print “gotchas” to escape accountability.

And in fact, this is now common practice across a lot of industries – from nursing homes, nursing homes that mistreat seniors, to for-profit colleges that defraud students. Who reads all that fine print? I don’t. And you get defrauded or you get mistreated, and then all of a sudden they say, ‘Well, you can’t sue us.’ So we’re going to rein in that abuse across everybody.

We also see a similar problem in some international trade agreements, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership. It sets up a dispute resolution system that favors large corporations over everyone else. It’s one of the reasons I’m against it. I’ve warned about this for years, I’ve written about it, and I oppose TPP now, I will oppose it after the election, I will oppose it as president – because it is one-sided and unfair to American workers.

And what about all those pharmaceutical companies that jack up prices for no reason? We’re going to have to protect ourselves against that too. And when we find unjustified spikes in the prices of longstanding, life-saving drugs, we should slap penalties on companies trying to cheat people who need those drugs.

And let’s finally import safe alternatives from other countries, like Canada, and speed up approvals to get more generic drugs on the market. And it is long past time to allow Medicare to negotiate for better prices for drugs and get the cost down for Medicare recipients. And I believe we should cap the amount working families pay out of pocket every month for medicine. No one should ever have to choose between paying the rent and filling their prescriptions.

So let’s stand up for taxpayers. Let’s stand up for consumers. And let’s stand up for small businesses, which create most of the jobs in America. I take this personally because of my dad’s very small business. We need fair rules of the road so big corporations can’t use their power to gain unfair advantages.

Now, when it comes to bullying small businesses, Donald Trump is the poster boy. I have heard so many stories of contractors, and I’ve met some too, who worked for him, produced the goods and services, and never got paid for what they were owed. I’m talking about painters, and plumbers, piano sellers, architects, glass installers – he stiffed them all. Not because he couldn’t pay them, but he wouldn’t pay them. And he told them, ‘You want to get your money? Sue me.’ My dad could never have done that. I’m just grateful my dad never got a contract with Donald Trump, because I don’t know what we would have done.

More than 60 percent of small businesses face payment delays. That can cause a serious cash flow crisis. So as president, I will explore new ways to arm small businesses with the tools to fight back and level the playing field. Part of the problem is large corporations are amassing so much power in our economy. Sometimes it’s called market concentration or even old-fashioned monopolies, but either way it threatens businesses of all sizes, as well as consumers. With less competition, corporations can use their power to raise prices, limit choice for consumers, cut wages for workers, crowd out startups and small businesses.

I mean, look what’s happening right now. In most of the country, the three largest health insurance companies in each state control 80 percent of the market. No wonder premiums are going up. As president, I will appoint tough, independent authorities to strengthen anti-trust enforcement and really scrutinize mergers and acquisitions, so the big don’t keep getting bigger and bigger.

I want every business to compete and thrive, and then I also want to do something else. Let’s protect and empower workers who actually drive our economy. Everyone who works hard should be able to share in the rewards, not just senior executives. So we’re proposing new tax credits to encourage more companies to share profits, on top of, not instead of, higher wages.

We need to support new organizing strategies for employees who too often have never had the benefit of collective bargaining. And we have to resist the assault on workers’ rights. Let’s say loudly and clearly: ‘right to work’ is wrong for workers and wrong for America.

Let’s also, my friends, let’s raise the minimum wage and support the Fight for 15 so you don’t live in poverty. Let’s defend overtime and go after wage theft. Let’s provide family leave that is paid and access to affordable, high-quality childcare. And of course you know what I’m going to say: let’s finally guarantee equal pay for women.

Now, my opponent and his chief surrogates like to say I’m playing the woman’s card. And I’ll tell you – right? – if fighting for working families is playing the women’s card, you know what? Deal me in!

And then finally, I’ve got a lot on my mind, but finally, we need to make it easier for companies to invest in good jobs here at home. As president, I will ramp up enforcement of trade rules by appointing a new chief trade prosecutor and tripling the number of enforcement officers. We will work with both parties to pass the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II. I want to direct $10 billion to create a ‘Make It in America’ partnership to support American manufacturing. And I want to take some of the ideas that worked when my husband was President and we ended up with 23 million new jobs and incomes went up for everybody.

That includes incentives like the New Markets Tax Credit for creating good jobs in poor or remote areas, from inner cities to rural communities ravaged – ravaged – by hollowed-out factories, ravaged by mines that have been shut down, ravaged by opiate addiction. It all comes down to this: When I say our economy should work for everyone, not just those at the top, I mean it. And we’re going to do everything we can to make sure workers are treated like assets, not costs. And we’re going to bring back infrastructure jobs, advanced manufacturing jobs, clean, renewable energy jobs, innovation, technology, small business.

Now, you don’t have to look any further than right here in Northwest Ohio. Just a few years ago, as you heard Kenyetta say, in 2009 you were in the eye of the storm. Jobs, homes, savings, wiped out. The auto industry on the verge of collapse. A lot of people were ready to give up on it. Well, that would have meant giving up on 850,000 people across this state whose jobs were tied to the industry. Donald Trump, for one, said rescuing the auto industry didn’t matter very much. Either way would have been acceptable, he said. ‘We could have just let it go,’ and that’s a direct quote from him. Everybody in Ohio who’s thinking about voting for Trump needs to hear that. At the time of the worst financial crisis in Ohio in 2009, he would have let you twist and fall. And for his running mate he picked Mike Pence, an ardent opponent of the auto rescue. Well, thank goodness the people of Northwest Ohio weren’t ready to let it go. You never gave up. You didn’t lose faith. And now, after a lot of hard work and sacrifice, the auto industry just had its best year ever.

But that’s not all there is to the story because in addition to that hard work, America, America, came to the rescue. Taxpayers like all of us, not him but us, provided the funds for the rescue. Union workers stepped up. Communities like Toledo came together to make it work. And now that the industry’s back on its feet, the auto companies have a responsibility to give back.

So I was delighted to hear that Chrysler is doubling down on Toledo, investing $700 million here to start building the next generation Jeep Wrangler, which could create about 700 new good jobs. And tens of thousands of UAW workers at Chrysler plants should see a big increase in profit-sharing payments above and beyond wages and benefits. Now, that’s the way it’s supposed to work, when we all help each other out. When we stand together, we are stronger together.

So what I want you to know is if you join me in this campaign, I will always stand up and fight for you and fight for your jobs and fight for your families. And I guess we have about 36 days left. The election’s going to be close. Every call you make, every door you knock, every friend you register to vote, could make the difference. You can text ‘join,’ j-o-i-n, to 47246 right now or go to hillaryclinton.com to sign up and volunteer. Here in Ohio you have until October the 11th to register to vote. And there are people with clipboards around, and you can go actually register today on your way out the door.

So we have just over a week to register, and then early voting starts October 12th. Let’s prove – let’s prove – that the American dream is big enough for everyone to share in its promise. Let’s prove that we’re going to stand together, make the smart decisions that we get the economy going and growing for everybody, not just those at the top; that we will stand up against special privilege and special interest; that we will be ready after this election to have an agenda that will really make a difference here in Toledo and across Ohio. So I’m here asking for your help, asking for your work, asking for you to be part of this campaign, and then when we win on November 8, be part of changing our country for the better! Thank you all and God bless you!”

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After touring the Futuramic Tool and Engineering facility in Warren, MI, Hillary delivered remarks addressing her plans for the economy in contrast to the very hazy, foreshortened bullets (I hesitate to call them plans) offered by Donald Trump. Bullets are great on a memo or a meeting agenda.  The American people want to hear how candidates plan to boost the economy.  Hillary presented a detailed, multifaceted, intersectional set of initiatives that, working in concert, will benefit all Americans and American families, not just those at the top.

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Just a note on Trump’s latest lies and other words. He told a crowd this morning that Hillary talks for 10 minutes and then goes home and sleeps.  Everyone here knows that is not true, and we actually often wonder if she ever gets a chance to sleep. His speech consisted largely (he thinks bigly is a word) of reading off a series of numbers from notes in his hand.  They were just numbers out of context. They meant nothing, and it was mystifying.  Hillary, in interview situations, for example, and town halls, can rattle off numbers from her head, without knowing a particular question is coming, and relates the numbers to concrete realities.  Trump held up a graph that he stared at more than he showed it to the audience.  It was a shabby imitation of Ross Perot who at least really knew the graphs and what they showed.  Perhaps Perot even made those graphs himself.  Trump looked at the graph and read the numbers as if they were alien to him and he had never seen them before.  In one instance he said, “I agree with this one.”  What an unprepared puppet of the billionaire boys club that he calls his economic advisory team!

Here is Hillary’s plan.

Stronger Together: Hillary Clinton’s Plan for An Economy That Works for Everyone, Not Just Those at the Top

Earlier today, Hillary Clinton delivered a speech in Warren, Michigan, posing four questions that should make voters’ choice in this election crystal clear. First, which candidate will actually stand up to those at the top and restore balance and fairness to our economy? Second, who has a better plan to create good-paying jobs? Third, who will really go to bat for working families? And, fourth, who can break through the dysfunction in Washington deliver real results for the American people?

Donald Trump fails each of these tests. Instead of restoring balance and fairness to our economy, he wants to provide trillions in tax breaks to corporations and the super-wealthy, exploding our deficit while leaving working families to hold the bag. Instead of creating good-paying jobs, his economic proposals would produce crisis and recession, resulting in 3.4 million lost jobs according to independent analysts who also projects that the economy would create 10.4 million jobs under Hillary Clinton’s plans. Instead of standing up for working families, Trump has made a career out of stiffing small businesses and outsourcing jobs. Instead of breaking through Washington gridlock, Trumps’ temper tantrums and name-calling would just make things worse.

Unlike Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton has the agenda, experience, and know-how to restore fairness to our economy, create good-paying jobs, stand up for working families, and break-through Washington’s dysfunction to deliver real results for the American people. She understands that we are stronger together when we grow together—when we all contribute to our prosperity and we all share in the rewards. While we have worked our way back from the Great Recession, too many Americans are still left out and left behind. Instead of growing together, we’re in danger of growing apart – with too few good-paying jobs, too much inequality, and a lack of basic economic security and fairness for working families.

We can meet these challenges. We can spur more economic growth, which will create more good-paying jobs and raise wages. And we can have more economic fairness, so the rewards are shared with everyone. Hillary Clinton is running for President to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. As she laid out in her speech last month in Raleigh, North Carolina, she is setting five big goals to get there:

  1. Break Through Washington Gridlock to Make the Boldest Investment in Good-Paying Jobs Since World War II
  2. Make Debt Free College Available to All Americans
  3. Rewrite the Rules to Ensure That Workers Share in the Profits They Help Create
  4. Ensure That Those at the Top Pay Their Fair Share
  5. Put Families First by Matching Our Policies to How Families Live, Learn, and Work in the 21st Century Economy

A summary of Hillary’s economic agenda is below. You can read about all of these proposals in greater detail at https://www.hillaryclinton.com/issues/.

I. BREAK THROUGH WASHINGTON GRIDLOCK TO MAKE THE BOLDEST INVESTMENT IN GOOD-PAYING JOBS SINCE WORLD WAR II

Our country has a strong bipartisan tradition of investing in our future—from Eisenhower’s Interstate highway system, which unlocked the potential of the American economy and drove the rise of the middle class, to the Apollo program, which put a man on the moon and fueled giant leaps forward in technology and innovation. Hillary Clinton will break through the gridlock in Washington to make these investments, which have been a hallmark of American prosperity, once again possible.

From her first day in office to her last, Hillary will make it a central priority to make sure that every American can find a good-paying job, with rising incomes across the board. That’s why she will make the largest investment in good-paying jobs since World War II. These investments will not just create good jobs today, they will unlock the potential of our businesses to create good-paying jobs in the future. And she is setting a goal of a full employment, full-potential economy, where we break down barriers and create good-paying jobs in every community, for people across the country willing to work hard. Hillary will:

  • Launch our country’s boldest investments in infrastructure since we built the Interstate highway system
  • Make audacious advancement in research and technology, creating the industries and jobs of the future
  • Establish the U.S. as the clean energy superpower of the world—with half a billion solar panels installed by the end of her first term and enough clean renewable energy to power every home in American within ten years of her taking office
  • Cut red tape, make small business tax filing as easy as keeping a checkbook, and expand access to capital so small businesses can grow, hire and thrive
  • Ensure that the jobs of the future in caregiving and services are good-paying jobs, recognize their fundamental contributions to families and to America
  • Pursue smarter, fairer, tougher trade policies that put U.S. job creation first and that get tough on nations like China that seek to prosper at the expense of our workers – including opposing trade deals, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership, that do not meet a high bar of creating good-paying jobs and raising pay
  • Commit to a full employment, full-potential economy and break down barriers so that growth, jobs, and prosperity are shared in every community in America, no matter where you live and no matter your race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or disability
  • Appoint Fed governors who share the belief that maximum employment is an essential prong of the Federal Reserve’s dual mandate

II. MAKE DEBT FREE COLLEGE AVAILABLE TO ALL AMERICANS

An economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, is based on the idea of equal opportunity and a belief that anyone can rise. That vision of our nation only works if we renew our commitment to education at every level. That’s why Hillary will fight for transformational investments that prepare the next generation for the jobs of the future—starting with debt-free college:

  • Eliminate tuition for working families and provide debt-free college to all Americans—because debt should never be a barrier to equal opportunity
  • Ease the crushing burden of student debt for 40 million Americans by allowing students to refinance at lower rates and making sure that none of them have to pay more than they can afford

III. REWRITE THE RULES TO ENSURE WORKERS SHARE IN THE PROFITS THEY HELP CREATE

Businesses thrive all over our country by seeing employees as assets to invest in, not costs to cut. They’re building companies, not stripping them, and creating good jobs, not eliminating them. But too many corporations take the opposite view. They seem to have forgotten that one of the biggest assets on their balance sheets is America itself. Hillary will make it easier for companies that take the “high road,” like sharing profits with their workers and investing in them over the long term. And she will make it harder for them to take the “low road,” by mistreating their workers and customers or walking out on America to avoid paying their fair share in taxes.

  • Reward companies that share profits with their employees, not just their executives
  • End the tyranny of “quarterly capitalism” and encourage companies to invest in America for the long-run
  • Reform our tax code to reward businesses that invest in jobs in the United States, and impose an exit tax on companies that move overseas to avoid paying their taxes
  • Strengthen our antitrust laws and enforcement so businesses get ahead by competing and benefitting their customers – not by unfairly concentrating markets
  • Eliminate write-offs and claw back special tax breaks when companies ship jobs and production overseas, and use the proceeds to invest in America
  • Pursue worker-friendly policies to make it harder for companies to race to the bottom in search of profits

IV. REWRITE THE RULES AND MAKE SURE THAT THOSE AT THE TOP PAY THEIR FAIR SHARE

Our tax code is rigged for those at the top, making it harder to invest in our future, whether it’s in infrastructure, education or healthcare. We need policies to address these discrepancies in our tax code and go after all the scams, loopholes, and special breaks exploited by corporations and the mega-rich, like the carried interest loophole that lets some hedge fund managers pay a lower rate than a teacher or a nurse. She believes that by making sure the most fortunate and corporations pay their fair share, we can afford to pay for the ambitious progressive investments she has put forward, in a fiscally responsible way, without adding to the debt.

As President, Hillary will make sure that corporations and the most fortunate play by the rules and pay their fair share – because they can afford it, and we’re all in this together. She will:

  • Reform our individual income tax code to make sure that no millionaire pays a lower tax rate than a middle-class family and impose a surcharge on the incomes of multi-millionaires
  • Close tax loopholes and special breaks that make it possible for the wealthy and corporations to avoid paying their fair share
  • Charge a risk fee on major Wall Street institutions
  • Close the “carried interest” loophole for Wall Street money managers – acting without Congress if it will not move forward on its own

V. PUT FAMILIES FIRST AND MAKE SURE THEY HAVE THE SECURITY AND OPPORTUNITY THEY NEED TO THRIVE IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

When we forged the basic bargain of our economy, with guarantees like Social Security, minimum wage, overtime pay, child labor laws, and other protections we count on today, our economy was very different. Most families got by on one income, and workers could expect to hold a steady job with good benefits for an entire career. Despite massive shifts in how our economy works today, too many of our policies are outdated and basic protections have not kept up. We need policies that match how we actually live and work in this 21st century economy. That means updating the basic bargain and putting families first. Hillary will:

  • Provide universal, affordable healthcareincluding offering a public option choice in every state, letting people over 55 buy into Medicare, and investing in community health centers
  • Work to ensure no family pays more than 10 percent of their income on child care by making the Child Tax Credit more generous for working families, making preschool universal for every 4 year-old in America, and significantly increasing our investment in high-quality child care programs
  • Break down barriers to make affordable housing and homeownership possible for hard working families

 

And now this!

David Cay Johnston:  Is a Crook Hiding in Donald Trump’s Taxes?

STAND

 

 

 

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As the moment was approaching I could hardly believe we  – and she – had finally done this. I tend to get very quiet and task-oriented around crises and great events. So I was very serene when Hillary tweeted this.

About to head out and accept your nomination for president. I’m so grateful to everyone who made this moment possible. -H

Getting ready.

So proud.

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“She always feels like there isn’t a moment to lose because she knows that for that mother, for that family, there isn’t.” —

“People ask me all the time: How does she do it?…Here’s how: It’s because she never, ever forgets who she’s fighting for.” —

“This November, I’m voting for a woman…who knows women’s rights are human rights…here at home and around the world.” —

“Mom, Grandma would be so, so proud of you tonight.” —

“Chelsea, thank you. I am so proud to be your mother and so proud of the woman you’ve become.” —Hillary

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In Philadelphia, Hillary Clinton Accepts the Democratic Nomination

At the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, Hillary Clinton accepted her party’s nomination. She told the audience that, despite the challenges of a changing world, we must not resort to Donald Trump’s dangerous proposals. Clinton also paid tribute to the Americans who have inspired her lifetime in public service and who continue to sustain her belief that we are stronger together: her mother Dorothy; the survivors and first responders on 9/11 and our men and women in uniform.

“We have the most dynamic and diverse people in the world. We have the most tolerant and generous young people we’ve ever had. We have the most powerful military. The most innovative entrepreneurs.The most enduring values. Freedom and equality, justice and opportunity,” Clinton said.

“We should be so proud that these words are associated with us.  That when people hear them – they hear… America. So don’t let anyone tell you that our country is weak We’re not. Don’t let anyone tell you we don’t have what it takes. We do. And most of all, don’t believe anyone who says: ‘I alone can fix it.’ […] Americans don’t say: ‘I alone can fix it.’ We say: ‘We’ll fix it together. […] It is with humility, determination and boundless confidence in America’s promise that I accept your nomination for President of the United States!”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Thank you.  Thank you so much.  Thank you.  Thank you all so much.  Thank you.  Thank you.  Thank you all very, very much.  Thank you for that amazing welcome.  Thank you all for the great convention that we’ve had.

And, Chelsea, thank you.  I am so proud to be your mother and so proud of the woman you’ve become.  Thank you for bringing Marc into our family and Charlotte and Aidan into the world.

And, Bill, that conversation we started in the law library 45 years ago, it is still going strong. That conversation has lasted through good times that filled us with joy and hard times that tested us.  And I’ve even gotten a few words in along the way. On Tuesday night, I was so happy to see that my explainer-in-chief is still on the job.  I’m also grateful to the rest of my family and to the friends of a lifetime.

For all of you whose hard work brought us here tonight and to those of you who joined this campaign this week, thank you.  What a remarkable week it’s been. We heard the man from Hope, Bill Clinton; and the man of hope, Barack Obama. America is stronger because of President Obama’s leadership, and I am better because of his friendship.

We heard from our terrific Vice President, the one and only Joe Biden. He spoke from his big heart about our party’s commitment to working people as only he can do.

And First Lady Michelle Obama reminded us – that our children are watching and the president we elect is going to be their president, too.

And for those of you out there who are just getting to know Tim Kaine, you – you will soon understand why the people of Virginia keep promoting him – from city council and mayor, to governor, and now Senator.  And he will make our whole country proud as our vice president.

And I want to thank Bernie Sanders. Bernie – Bernie, your campaign inspired millions of Americans, particularly the young people who threw their hearts and souls into our primary.  You put economic and social justice issues front and center, where they belong.

And to all of your supporters here and around the country, I want you to know I have heard you.  Your cause is our cause. Our country needs your ideas, energy, and passion.  That is the only way we can turn our progressive platform into real change for America.  We wrote it together.  Now let’s go out and make it happen together.

My friends, we’ve come to Philadelphia, the birthplace of our nation, because what happened in this city 240 years ago still has something to teach us today.  We all know the story, but we usually focus on how it turned out, and not enough on how close that story came to never being written at all.  When representatives from 13 unruly colonies met just down the road from here, some wanted to stick with the king, and some wanted to stick it to the king.

The revolution hung in the balance.  Then somehow they began listening to each other, compromising, finding common purpose. And by the time they left Philadelphia, they had begun to see themselves as one nation.  That’s what made it possible to stand up to a king.  That took courage.  They had courage.  Our founders embraced the enduring truth that we are stronger together.

Now America is once again at a moment of reckoning.  Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart.  Bonds of trust and respect are fraying.  And just as with our founders, there are no guarantees.  It truly is up to us.  We have to decide whether we will all work together so we can all rise together. Our country’s motto is e pluribus unum: out of many, we are one. Will we stay true to that motto?

Well, we heard Donald Trump’s answer last week at his convention.  He wants to divide us from the rest of the world and from each other.  He’s betting that the perils of today’s world will blind us to its unlimited promise.  He’s taken the Republican Party a long way from ‘Morning in America’ to ‘Midnight in America.’ He wants us to fear the future and fear each other.

Well, a great Democratic President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, came up with the perfect rebuke to Trump more than 80 years ago, during a much more perilous time: ‘The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.’

Now we are clear-eyed about what our country is up against, but we are not afraid.  We will rise to the challenge, just as we always have.  We will not build a wall.  Instead, we will build an economy where everyone who wants a good job can get one. And we’ll build a path to citizenship for millions of immigrants who are already contributing to our economy. We will not ban a religion.  We will work with all Americans and our allies to fight and defeat terrorism.

Yet, we know there is a lot to do.  Too many people haven’t had a pay raise since the crash.  There’s too much inequality, too little social mobility, too much paralysis in Washington, too many threats at home and abroad.

But just look for a minute at the strengths we bring as Americans to meet these challenges.  We have the most dynamic and diverse people in the world. We have the most tolerant and generous young people we’ve ever had. We have the most powerful military, the most innovative entrepreneurs, the most enduring values – freedom and equality, justice and opportunity.  We should be so proud that those words are associated with us. I have to tell you, as your Secretary of State, I went to 112 countries.  When people hear those words, they hear America.

So don’t let anyone tell you that our country is weak.  We’re not.  Don’t let anyone tell you we don’t have what it takes.  We do. And most of all, don’t believe anyone who says, ‘I alone can fix it.’  Yes.  Those were actually Donald Trump’s words in Cleveland.  And they should set off alarm bells for all of us.  Really?  ‘I alone can fix it?  Isn’t he forgetting troops on the front lines, police officers and firefighters who run toward danger, doctors and nurses who care for us? Teachers who change lives, entrepreneurs who see possibilities in every problem, mothers who lost children to violence and are building a movement to keep other kids safe?  He’s forgetting every last one of us.  Americans don’t say, ‘I alone fix can it.’  We say, ‘We’ll fix it together.’

And remember.  Remember.  Our founders fought a revolution and wrote a Constitution so America would never be a nation where one person had all the power. 240 years later, we still put our faith in each other.  Look at what happened in Dallas.  After the assassinations of five brave police officers, Police Chief David Brown asked the community to support his force, maybe even join them.  And do you know how the community responded?  Nearly 500 people applied in just 12 days.

That’s how Americans answer when the call for help goes out.  20 years ago, I wrote a book called It Takes a Village.  And a lot of people looked at the title and asked, what the heck do you mean by that?  This is what I mean.  None of us can raise a family, build a business, heal a community, or lift a country totally alone. America needs every one of us to lend our energy, our talents, our ambition to making our nation better and stronger.  I believe that with all my heart.  That’s why ‘Stronger Together’ is not just a lesson from our history, it’s not just a slogan for our campaign, it’s a guiding principle for the country we’ve always been, and the future we’re going to build.

A country where the economy works for everyone, not just those at the top. Where you can get a good job and send your kids to a good school no matter what ZIP Code you live in.  A country where all our children can dream, and those dreams are within reach.  Where families are strong, communities are safe, and, yes, where love trumps hate.  That’s the country we’re fighting for.  That’s the future we’re working toward.  And so, my friends, it is with humility, determination, and boundless confidence in America’s promise that I accept your nomination for president of the United States.

Now, sometimes the people at this podium are new to the national stage.  As you know, I’m not one of those people.  I’ve been your first lady, served eight years as a senator from the great state of New York. Then I represented all of you as Secretary of State. But my job titles only tell you what I’ve done.  They don’t tell you why.  The truth is, through all these years of public service, the service part has always come easier to me than the public part.  I get it that some people just don’t know what to make of me.  So let me tell you.

The family I’m from, well, no one had their name on big buildings.  My families were just like pool maintenance company hampton va of a different kind, builders in the way most American families are.  They used whatever tools they had, whatever God gave them, and whatever life in America provided, and built better lives and better futures for their kids.

My grandfather worked in the same Scranton lace mill for 50 years – because he believed that if he gave everything he had, his children would have a better life than he did.  And he was right.  My dad, Hugh, made it to college.  He played football at Penn State – and enlisted in the Navy after Pearl Harbor.  When the war was over he started his own small business, printing fabric for draperies.  I remember watching him stand for hours over silkscreens.  He wanted to give my brothers and me opportunities he never had, and he did.

My mother, Dorothy, was abandoned by her parents as a young girl.  She ended up on her own at 14, working as a housemaid.  She was saved by the kindness of others.  Her first grade teacher saw she had nothing to eat at lunch, and brought extra food to share the entire year.  The lesson she passed on to me years later stuck with me:  No one gets through life alone.  We have to look out for each other and lift each other up.  And she made sure I learned the words from our Methodist faith: ‘Do all the good you can, for all the people you can, in all the ways you can, as long as ever you can.’

So I went to work for the Children’s Defense Fund, going door to door in New Bedford, Massachusetts – on behalf of children with disabilities who were denied the chance to go to school.  Remember meeting a young girl in a wheelchair on the small back porch of her house.  She told me how badly she wanted to go to school.  It just didn’t seem possible in those days.  And I couldn’t stop thinking of my mother and what she’d gone through as a child.  It became clear to me that simply caring is not enough.  To drive real progress, you have to change both hearts and laws.  You need both understanding and action.

So we gathered facts.  We build a coalition.  And our work helped convince Congress to ensure access to education for all students with disabilities.  It’s a big idea, isn’t it?  Every kid with a disability has the right to go to school. But how do you make an idea like that real?  You do it step by step, year by year, sometimes even door by door.  My heart just swelled when I saw Anastasia Somoza representing millions of young people on this stage – because we changed our law to make sure she got an education.

So it’s true.  I sweat the details of policy, whether we’re talking about the exact level of lead in the drinking water in Flint, Michigan – the number of mental health facilities in Iowa, or the cost of your prescription drugs.  Because it’s not just a detail if it’s your kid, if it’s your family.  It’s a big deal.  And it should be a big deal to your president, too.

After the four days of this convention, you’ve seen some of the people who’ve inspired me, people who let me into their lives and became a part of mine, people like Ryan Moore and Lauren Manning.  They told their stories Tuesday night.  I first met Ryan as a 7-year-old.  He was wearing a full body brace that must have weighed 40 pounds because I leaned over to lift him up.  Children like Ryan kept me going when our plan for universal health care failed, and kept me working with leaders of both parties to help create the Children’s Health Insurance Program that covers eight million kids in our country. Lauren Manning, who stood here with such grace and power, was gravely injured on 9/11.

It was the thought of her, and Debbie Stage. John who you saw in the movie, and John Dolan and Joe Sweeney and all the victims and survivors, that kept me working as hard as I could in the Senate on behalf of 9/11 families and our first responders who got sick from their time at Ground Zero.  I was thinking of Lauren, Debbie, and all the others ten years laterin the White House Situation Room, when President Obama made the courageous decision that finally brought Osama bin Laden to justice.

And in this campaign I’ve met many more people who motivate me to keep fighting for change, and with your help, I will carry all of your voices and stories with me to the White House. And you heard from Republicans and Independents who are supporting our campaign.  Well, I will be a president for Democrats, Republicans, Independents, for the struggling, the striving, the successful, for all those who vote for me and for those who don’t.  For all Americans together.

Tonight, we’ve reached a milestone in our nation’s march toward a more perfect union: the first time that a major party has nominated a woman for president. Standing here as my mother’s daughter, and my daughter’s mother, I’m so happy this day has come.  I’m happy for grandmothers and little girls and everyone in between.  I’m happy for boys and men – because when any barrier falls in America, it clears the way for everyone. After all, when there are no ceilings, the sky’s the limit.

So let’s keep going until every one of the 161 million women and girls across America has the opportunity she deserves to have.  But even more important than the history we make tonight is the history we will write together in the years ahead.  Let’s begin with what we’re going to do to help working people in our country get ahead and stay ahead.

Now, I don’t think President Obama and Vice President Biden get the credit they deserve for saving us from the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes. Our economy is so much stronger than when they took office.  Nearly 15 million new private sector jobs.  20 million more Americans with health insurance.  And an auto industry that just had its best year ever.

Now, that’s real progress.  But none of us can be satisfied with the status quo.  Not by a long shot.  We’re still facing deep-seated problems that developed long before the recession and have stayed with us through the recovery.  I’ve gone around the country talking to working families.  And I’ve heard from many who feel like the economy sure isn’t working for them.  Some of you are frustrated – even furious.  And you know what?  You’re right.  It’s not yet working the way it should.

Americans are willing to work – and work hard.  But right now, an awful lot of people feel there is less and less respect for the work they do.  And less respect for them, period.  Democrats, we are the party of working people.  But we haven’t done a good enough job showing we get what you’re going through, and we’re going to do something to help.

So tonight I want to tell you how we will empower Americans to live better lives.  My primary mission as president will be to create more opportunity and more good jobs with rising wages right here in the United States. From my first day in office to my last.  Especially in places that for too long have been left out and left behind.  From our inner cities to our small towns, from Indian country to coal country. From communities ravaged by addiction to regions hollowed out by plant closures.

And here’s what I believe.  I believe America thrives when the middle class thrives.  I believe our economy isn’t working the way it should because our democracy isn’t working the way it should. That’s why we need to appoint Supreme Court justices who will get money out of politics and expand voting rights, not restrict them. And if necessary, we will pass a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United.

I believe American corporations that have gotten so much from our country should be just as patriotic in return.  Many of them are, but too many aren’t.  It’s wrong to take tax breaks with one hand and give out pink slips with the other. And I believe Wall Street can never, ever be allowed to wreck Main Street again.

And I believe in science. I believe that climate change is real and that we can save our planet while creating millions of good-paying clean energy jobs.

I believe that when we have millions of hardworking immigrants contributing to our economy, it would be self-defeating and inhumane to try to kick them out. Comprehensive immigration reform will grow our economy and keep families together – and it’s the right thing to do.

So whatever party you belong to, or if you belong to no party at all, if you share these beliefs, this is your campaign.  If you believe that companies should share profits, not pad executive bonuses, join us. If you believe the minimum wage should be a living wage, and no one working full-time should have to raise their children in poverty, join us. If you believe that every man, woman, and child in America has the right to affordable health care, join us! If you believe that we should say no to unfair trade deals; that we should stand up to China; that we should support our steelworkers and autoworkers and homegrown manufacturers, then join us.  If you believe we should expand Social Security and protect a woman’s right to make her own heath care decisions, then join us. And yes, yes, if you believe that your working mother, wife, sister, or daughter deserves equal pay join us. That’s how we’re going to make sure this economy works for everyone, not just those at the top.

Now, you didn’t hear any of this, did you, from Donald Trump at his convention.  He spoke for 70-odd minutes – and I do mean odd. And he offered zero solutions.  But we already know he doesn’t believe these things.  No wonder he doesn’t like talking about his plans.  You might have noticed, I love talking about mine.

In my first 100 days, we will work with both parties to pass the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II.  Jobs in manufacturing, clean energy, technology and innovation, small business, and infrastructure.  If we invest in infrastructure now, we’ll not only create jobs today, but lay the foundation for the jobs of the future.

And we will also transform the way we prepare our young people for those jobs.  Bernie Sanders and I will work together to make college tuition-free for the middle class and debt-free for all. We will also – we will also liberate millions of people who already have student debt.  It’s just not right that Donald Trump can ignore his debts, and students and families can’t refinance their debts.

And something we don’t say often enough:  Sure, college is crucial, but a four-year degree should not be the only path to a good job. We will help more people learn a skill or practice a trade and make a good living doing it. We will give small businesses, like my dad’s, a boost, make it easier to get credit.  Way too many dreams die in the parking lots of banks.  In America, if you can dream it, you should be able to build it.

And we will help you balance family and work.  And you know what, if fighting for affordable child care and paid family leave is playing the ‘woman card,’ then deal me in.

Now – now, here’s the other thing. Now, we’re not only going to make all of these investments.  We’re going to pay for every single one of them.  And here’s how. Wall Street, corporations, and the super-rich are going to start paying their fair share of taxes. This is – this is not because we resent success, but when more than 90 percent of the gains have gone to the top 1 percent, that’s where the money is.  And we are going to follow the money. And if companies take tax breaks and then ship jobs overseas, we’ll make them pay us back.  And we’ll put that money to work where it belongs:  creating jobs here at home.

Now, I imagine that some of you are sitting at home thinking, well, that all sounds pretty good, but how are you going to get it done?  How are you going to break through the gridlock in Washington?  Well, look at my record. I’ve worked across the aisle to pass laws and treaties and to launch new programs that help millions of people.  And if you give me the chance, that’s exactly what I’ll do as President.

But then – but then I also imagine people are thinking out there, but Trump, he’s a businessman.  He must know something about the economy.  Well, let’s take a closer look, shall we?  In Atlantic City, 60 miles from here, you will find contractors and small businesses who lost everything because Donald Trump refused to pay his bills. Now, remember what the President said last night.  Don’t boo.  Vote.

But think of this.  People who did the work and needed the money, not because he couldn’t pay them, but because he wouldn’t pay them, he just stiffed them.  And you know that sales pitch he’s making to be president:  put your faith in him, and you’ll win big?  That’s the same sales pitch he made to all those small businesses.  Then Trump walked away and left working people holding the bag.

He also talks a big game about putting America first.  Well, please explain what part of America First leads him to make Trump ties in China, not Colorado; Trump suits in Mexico, not Michigan; Trump furniture in Turkey, not Ohio; Trump picture frames in India, not Wisconsin.

Donald Trump says he wants to make America great again.  Well, he could start by actually making things in America again.

Now, the choice we face in this election is just as stark when it comes to our national security.  Anyone – anyone reading the news can see the threats and turbulence we face.  From Baghdad and Kabul, to Nice and Paris and Brussels, from San Bernardino to Orlando, we’re dealing with determined enemies that must be defeated. So it’s no wonder that people are anxious and looking for reassurance, looking for steady leadership, wanting a leader who understands we are stronger when we work with our allies around the world and care for our veterans here at home. Keeping our nation safe and honoring the people who do that work will be my highest priority.

I’m proud that we put a lid on Iran’s nuclear program without firing a single shot. Now we have to enforce it, and we must keep supporting Israel’s security. I’m proud that we shaped a global climate agreement.  Now we have to hold every country accountable to their commitments, including ourselves. And I’m proud to stand by our allies in NATO against any threat they face, including from Russia.

I’ve laid out my strategy for defeating ISIS.  We will strike their sanctuaries from the air and support local forces taking them out on the ground.  We will surge our intelligence so we detect and prevent attacks before they happen.  We will disrupt their efforts online to reach and radicalize young people in our country. It won’t be easy or quick, but make no mistake we will prevail.

Now Donald Trump – Donald Trump says, and this is a quote, ‘I know more about ISIS than the generals do.’ No, Donald, you don’t.

He thinks – he thinks he knows more than our military because he claimed our armed forces are ‘a disaster.’ Well, I’ve had the privilege to work closely with our troops and our veterans for many years, including as a Senator on the Armed Services Committee.  And I know how wrong he is.  Our military is a national treasure. We entrust our commander-in-chief to make the hardest decisions our nation faces:  decisions about war and peace, life and death.  A president should respect the men and women who risk their lives to serve our country, including – including Captain Khan and the sons of Tim Kaine and Mike Pence, both Marines. So just ask yourself:  Do you really think Donald Trump has the temperament to be commander-in-chief?  Donald Trump can’t even handle the rough-and-tumble of a presidential campaign. He loses his cool at the slightest provocation – when he’s gotten a tough question from a reporter, when he’s challenged in a debate, when he sees a protestor at a rally.  Imagine, if you dare imagine, imagine him in the Oval Office facing a real crisis.  A man you can bait with a tweet is not a man we can trust with nuclear weapons.

I can’t put it any better than Jackie Kennedy did after the Cuban Missile Crisis.  She said that what worried President Kennedy during that very dangerous time was that a war might be started – not by big men with self-control and restraint, but by little men, the ones moved by fear and pride. America’s strength doesn’t come from lashing out.  It relies on smarts, judgment, cool resolve, and the precise and strategic application of power.  And that’s the kind of commander-in-chief I pledge to be.

And if we’re serious about keeping our country safe, we also can’t afford to have a president who’s in the pocket of the gun lobby. I’m not here to repeal the Second Amendment.  I’m not here to take away your guns.  I just don’t want you to be shot by someone who shouldn’t have a gun in the first place. We will work tirelessly with responsible gun owners to pass common-sense reforms and keep guns out of the hands of criminals, terrorists, and all others who would do us harm.

For decades, people have said this issue was too hard to solve and the politics too hot to touch.  But I ask you:  How can we just stand by and do nothing?  You heard, you saw, family members of people killed by gun violence on this stage.  You heard, you saw family members of police officers killed in the line of duty because they were outgunned by criminals.  I refuse to believe we can’t find common ground here.  We have to heal the divides in our country, not just on guns but on race, immigration, and more.

And that starts with listening, listening to each other, trying as best we can to walk in each other’s shoes.  So let’s put ourselves in the shoes of young black and Latino men and women who face the effects of systemic racism and are made to feel like their lives are disposable. Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to do a dangerous and necessary job.  We will reform our criminal justice system from end to end, and rebuild trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve. And we will defend – we will defend all our rights:  civil rights, human rights, and voting rights; women’s rights and workers’ rights; LGBT rights and the rights of people with disabilities. And we will stand up against mean and divisive rhetoric wherever it comes from.

For the past year, many people made the mistake of laughing off Donald Trump’s comments, excusing him as an entertainer just putting on a show.  They thought he couldn’t possibly mean all the horrible things he says, like when he called women ‘pigs’ or said that an American judge couldn’t be fair because of his Mexican heritage, or when he mocks and mimics a reporter with a disability, or insults prisoners of war – like John McCain, a hero and a patriot who deserves our respect.

Now, at first, I admit, I couldn’t believe he meant it, either.  It was just too hard to fathom, that someone who wants to lead our nation could say those things, could be like that.  But here’s the sad truth:  There is no other Donald Trump.  This is it. And in the end, it comes down to what Donald Trump doesn’t get:  America is great because America is good.

So enough with the bigotry and the bombast.  Donald Trump’s not offering real change.  He’s offering empty promises.  And what are we offering?  A bold agenda to improve the lives of people across our country – to keep you safe, to get you good jobs, to give your kids the opportunities they deserve.

The choice is clear, my friends.  Every generation of Americans has come together to make our country freer, fairer, and stronger.  None of us ever have or can do it alone.  I know that at a time when so much seems to be pulling us apart, it can be hard to imagine how we’ll ever pull together.  But I’m here to tell you tonight – progress is possible.  I know.  I know because I’ve seen it in the lives of people across America who get knocked down and get right back up.

And I know it from my own life.  More than a few times, I’ve had to pick myself up and get back in the game.  Like so much else in my life, I got this from my mother too.  She never let me back down from any challenge.  When I tried to hide from a neighborhood bully, she literally blocked the door. ‘Go back out there,’ she said.  And she was right.  You have to stand up to bullies. You have to keep working to make things better, even when the odds are long and the opposition is fierce.

We lost our mother a few years ago, but I miss her every day.  And I still hear her voice urging me to keep working, keep fighting for right, no matter what.  That’s what we need to do together as a nation. And though ‘we may not live to see the glory,’ as the song from the musical Hamilton goes, ‘let us gladly join the fight.’  Let our legacy be about ‘planting seeds in a garden you never get to see.’

That’s why we’re here, not just in this hall, but on this Earth.  The Founders showed us that, and so have many others since.  They were drawn together by love of country, and the selfless passion to build something better for all who follow.  That is the story of America.  And we begin a new chapter tonight.

Yes, the world is watching what we do.  Yes, America’s destiny is ours to choose.  So let’s be stronger together, my fellow Americans.  Let’s look to the future with courage and confidence.  Let’s build a better tomorrow for our beloved children and our beloved country.  And when we do, America will be greater than ever.

Thank you and may God bless you and the United States of America.”

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Hillary appeared with Senators Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken yesterday in Minneapolis.

At AFT Convention, Clinton Pledges to Work with Educators to Strengthen America’s Public Schools

At the AFT Convention in Minneapolis on Monday, Hillary Clinton reiterated her commitment to ensure every child receives a world-class education, regardless of their ZIP code. Clinton pledged to partner with teachers in the White House to repair our crumbling schools, invest in training and support for our educators, and provide every student in America the opportunity to learn computer science.

Clinton argued that Donald Trump is unfit to serve as president. Trump wants to “largely” eliminate the Department of Education, believes we invest too much in public education, and selected a running mate who slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students. As Clinton said, “Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello!  Hello, AFT!  My goodness, I was listening in the back and I heard Randi at the end of her remarks say, ‘And I’ve known her for 25 years.’ Wow, it’s been fun, hasn’t it?  Gone by fast.

Well, I’m thrilled to be here, and it is only fitting that AFT is celebrating your centennial right here in Minnesota, a state with a proud tradition of public service and great public education.I am thrilled that former Vice President Walter Mondale is here with us. He was one of my earliest inspirations, and I am always grateful for his life of service.  And I also want to say a word about Governor Wendell Anderson.  My thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends, and the countless people whose lives he touched.  Minnesota has a great tradition of electing terrific public servants. And I am so proud to be here with this state’s dynamic duo.  You got a preview, a taste of the combination that Amy and Al represent, but I can tell you that the two senators from Minnesota are among the greatest that Minnesota has ever sent to Washington, and among the greatest to have ever served in the United States Senate. And I just said exactly what they told me to say.  I’ve known Al a long time.  He handed me this slip of paper on the way in.  But no, I consider them both great friends and I am so excited about being able to work with them again starting next January 2017.And Randi, thank you for that introduction, but much more than that, thanks for standing up to injustice in all of its forms.  As Randi said earlier, these have been difficult days for our country and the world.  Just over a week ago, Philando Castile died in a police incident outside St. Paul.”\

AUDIENCE MEMBERS:  “Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.”

HILLARY CLINTON:  “And I just had the great honor – the great honor and the great privilege of meeting with his mother and meeting with two of his uncles and his sister.  And I had heard a lot about Phil, because that is what they call him.  And I share – I share the urgency and the commitment to actually address these issues.

But let me tell you, my friends, let me tell you, we cannot let this madness continue. A lot of people are still in pain right here, including his courageous family, his coworkers and students at the St. Paul public schools.  And to our AFT brothers and sisters in the Twin Cities who knew him as a fellow educator who cared deeply about this community and its children, his mother was telling me how he never wanted to miss a day of work.  He drove 30 miles from their home in Minneapolis to the school where he worked.  Nothing could stop him from being there.  And his death, his loss is ours as well.  Our country has been confronted – our country has been confronted with tragedy too many times recently, hasn’t it?  From St. Paul to Orlando, from Dallas to Baton Rouge, where we saw three police officers murdered yesterday in an apparent ambush.  This hate, this violence cannot stand.  Killing police officers is a crime against us all.  There can be no justification, no looking the other way, and this must end.  And it can. It can be true both that we need law enforcement and that we need to improve law enforcement to get back – to get back to the fundamental principle that everyone in every community benefits when there is respect for the law and everyone is respected by the law.

The service and sacrifice of your fellow public employees is crucial to keeping our communities safe, and these murders threaten the painful, essential work we have to do as a nation.  And for many of the people in this room, that work includes explaining these incidents to our children.  Something you’ve had to do more and more this past year.  So to every single AFT member, I say thank you.

Thank you for caring for all of our children no matter what they look like, where they come from, or who they are.

And thank you for being one of the essential partners in everything we’ve got to do to move our country in the right direction.  Thank you for fighting to reform our broken campaign finance system.  I will stand with you and propose a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. Thank you.  Thank you for fighting to defend and improve the Affordable Care Act – and I will work with you to keep pushing for universal health care coverage. Most of all, thank you for a century of fighting for fairness and opportunity – the teachers, paraprofessionals, school-related personnel, the nurses, and public service employees of AFT.

I know that you have some of the hardest, most important jobs in the world.  And I want to say right from the outset that I’m with you. When I am president, you will have a partner in the White House and you will always have a seat at the table. Because just like you, I get up every day and I ask, how can we do better for America’s kids?  I am committed to making sure every child in this country receives a world-class education with good schools and good teachers, no matter what ZIP code they live in. And I know that starts with supporting parents to be their child’s first teachers. And expanding access to high-quality childcare and universal preschool for every single child.

I know that means repairing our crumbling schools and investing in training and support for our educators, because when we invest in education, we invest in our country’s future.  And you know what?  We also then invest in a stronger economy.  Some of you may know that these issues aren’t new to me.  My first job out of law school was working for the Children’s Defense Fund.  I went door to door in New Bedford, Massachusetts, talking with families whose kids had disabilities that made it hard or impossible for them to go to school.  Our work helped convince Congress to guarantee access to education for all students.  And years later, when my husband was governor of Arkansas, he put me in charge of working to improve our schools, and we held hearings in every county and we came up with a plan, then we fought hard to raise standards and get schools more resources and to get teachers the raises they deserved, which was the highest increase of any state in the country at that time.

So, you see, along with my personal experience, I carry these lessons.  If we work together, we can give schools and educators the resources you need to succeed.  My plan to strengthen public education comes down to TLC: teaching, learning, and community.  America is asking more of our educators than ever before.  Some of you heard the impassioned plea from the police chief in Dallas when he said our society is asking so much more of our police to deal with so many problems.  Well, it’s true of our teachers and our educators as well.

We look to you to fill in gaps that we, as a country, have neglected, like helping low-income kids, English-language learners, kids with disabilities thrive.  And we ask you to help right wrongs, from poverty and homelessness to the legacy of racial inequities stretching back centuries.  We ask so much of you and we don’t give you enough in return. As president, I will launch a national campaign to modernize and elevate the profession of teaching.  I want all educators, at every stage of your careers, to know you’ll be able to keep learning, improving and innovating.  And we also need to be serious about raising wages for teachers and support staff.  Anyone who works full-time in America should be able to earn a living wage without taking second and third jobs just to get by.

And the last thing a teacher needs when you’re just starting out is a mountain of student debt.  When I’m president, future students won’t have to borrow a dime to attend public colleges or universities.  For families making less than $125,000 a year, we will eliminate tuition at public colleges and universities altogether. And for the millions who already have student debt, you will be able to refinance your student loans so you never have to pay more than you can afford.  And if you go into public service, which includes teaching, any remaining debt will be forgiven after 10 years.

Now, we need to make college more affordable, but we can’t cut costs at the expense of talented, committed educators at colleges across the country, including adjunct faculty members.  (Cheers and applause.)  They also deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, and to have a strong voice with a union. If we are serious about supporting educators, we need to support unions.  And I will fight back against attacks on working families in America, and I will defend your right to organize and bargain collectively, and we will not stand for attempts to privatize public services.

Now, here’s what I know.  I know these things can only be done with you in partnership.  So I’m asking you, asking educators across the country, to work with me; asking you to advise me and to hold me accountable; to keep advocating for your students, your profession, and your communities.  Because together, we are stronger, and we can produce results if we get up every single day, make up our minds we’re going to keep working to achieve the goals that I have set out.

The second piece of TLC is learning.  We need to educate our children for the future, not the past.  We want our children to be creators, innovators, entrepreneurs, critical thinkers who can collaborate and communicate within their communities and around the world.  That means we need to be reaching together for new heights, not rehashing old arguments.  It’s time to stop focusing only on, quote, ‘failing schools.’  Let’s focus on all of our great schools too.  When schools get it right, let’s replicate their practices across America. There’s a lot we can learn from each other, and I intend to make sure that we have the best research, the best evidence, no matter where it comes from – that you then can put to work on behalf of your students.

So yes, we are going to do everything possible to work with schools across America.  I’ve been in a lot of those schools.  I used to have what I called the Chelsea test. Now I’ve got the Charlotte test. And that test is pretty simple.  Would I want my daughter, and now my granddaughter, and soon my grandson, to go to school here? I’ll tell you what.  I have walked into a lot of schools where I said, boy, would I be happy – would I be happy to have the most important child in the world to me attend here.  But I’ve also walked into schools where literally the building is falling down, where you can see the holes in the ceiling, where you can see the mold, where you walk into a library and there’s not a single book and there certainly is not a computer.  We can’t tolerate that.  We can’t let any one of America’s precious children – I don’t care who they are – attend a school that shows we don’t care about them.

And that’s why we are not going to go in the direction of letting people on the outside foist for-profit schools on our kids.  We are going to continue to oppose vouchers that drain resources from public schools and undermine their ability to provide the education our children deserve. Where there are public charter schools, we will learn from them.  But what we’re interested in is making sure that every child in our country has the chance to attend a great public school. And I believe part of that rests on working together to find the right balance on testing.

Now, look, you know; you’re the experts.  Tests can provide critical information to teachers and parents to find out how kids are doing, how schools are doing to help them improve.  But when you are forced to teach to a test, our children miss out on some of the most valuable experiences they can gain in a classroom during their school years. I personally have no time for these so-called education wars.  It’s time for those of us who believe in public education to sit at one table, around it together, and listen to you – the teachers and support paraprofessionals who actually are with our kids all day long.

And let’s start making decisions about what’s best for our kids not in accordance with some entrenched ideology.  Consider this:  Right now, there are more than half a million open jobs that require computing skills across the country, in every major industry.  But you know the majority of our schools don’t offer computer science.  That’s partly because there’s a shortage of computer science teachers, it’s partly because our educators don’t have the time or resources to learn how to integrate digital tools into their curriculum.  And we can do something about that.  And on top of it, more than 70 percent of teachers assign homework that requires broadband access, but more than 5 million children don’t have it.  We’re just taking this digital divide and making it a huge problem in the lives of 5 million kids.  And we can do something about that.

As president, I will be your partner to take on these challenges.  We’re going to make sure every child in America has the opportunity to learn computer science.  We’re going to work to close the homework gap by making every student has broadband access that they can use to do their homework. So let’s use all the tools at our disposal, including technology, to give kids an education that will meet the skills needed for the jobs we’re producing.

And finally, there’s C in TLC, community.  So much of what happens inside your classroom is determined by what happens outside.  Too many of our public school students are living in poverty.  For the first time ever, it’s a majority.  51 percent.  That’s on all of us.  But you see students coming to school hungry or exhausted from a long night in a shelter.  So many kids have the weight of the world on their little shoulders.  And we need to tackle all the problems holding our kids back.  And we need to do it together.

I’ve had so many meetings and conversations with teachers, it just breaks my heart, as they tell me about kids who come to school in the dead of winter, no coat on their back.  Come to school unable to even look in their teacher’s face because of what just happened at home or on the way to school.  Go home from school dodging gangs trying to recruit them.  That’s a stain on all of us.  Let’s create more community schools.  More partnerships between schools, social services, and nonprofit organizations.  Let’s pledge that we’re going to give children who need it the mental health services that they deserve.

And you should not have to be from a wealthy family to join a soccer team or have access to extracurricular activities that can develop your confidence and your feeling that you are an important person in the world in the eyes of those who are looking at you.  So we’re going to have to work together.  There is no choice.  From the community level all the way to the White House.  That’s just one of the many reasons why this election is it so important.  I’ll tell you what.  If I weren’t running against him, I would ask Randy to invite me here so I could rail against him.

Because it’s no surprise, my friends, that Donald Trump has a very different take on all of this.  He has said that America spends too much on education.  This is coming from someone who wants to give millionaires a free trillion dollar tax cut over the next decade. At least.  I’d like to hear him explain that to parents in Detroit, where students are trying to learn in crumbling, rodent infested classrooms.  He wants to, and I quote, ‘largely eliminate the Department of Education.’  But he says maybe he’ll leave some tentacles out there, whatever that means.

Now look, that agency may not always get it right, but it provides support for vital programs, from pre-K to Pell grants, and crucial resources to help low income students, students with disabilities, and English-language learners.  So Donald Trump would leave our most vulnerable students to fend for themselves.  If you want to know what kind of president Donald Trump will be, just look at who he’s chosen as his running mate. A Tea Party politician who has worked to undermine the rights of women, workers, LGBT Americans, and immigrants.

Mike Pence is one of the most extreme vice presidential picks in a generation.  And he’s one of the most hostile politicians in America when it comes to public education.  As governor of Indiana, he cut millions from higher education while he was giving huge tax cuts to corporations.  He turned away millions of federal dollars that could have expanded access to preschool for low income children, and slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students.  Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education.

And one more thing.  Parents and educators across America are already worried about what they’re calling the Trump effect, with bullying and harassment on the rise in our schools.  Last week, a mother in Wisconsin wrote me a letter saying that her adopted son had turned to her and said, if Trump becomes president, he’s going to make me go back to Ethiopia.  That’s the kind of fear Donald Trump is creating in the heart of a 10 year old boy.  What do our children think when he calls women pigs, or mocks a reporter with a disability?  Or when he talks about banning one and a half billion Muslims from entering our country?  What do our kids take away from his racist attack against a federal judge, or when he encourages his supporters to punch protesters in the face?  You wouldn’t tolerate that kind of behavior in your home or in your classroom.  How can we stand for it from someone running to be president of the United States?

Well, we know America’s a bighearted, fair-minded country, and that with your help, we’re going to continue to stress to our kids this is one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.  Not just for people who look a certain way, or worship a certain way.  We’re stronger when every child has the chance to live up to his or her full potential.  And public education gives our kids that chance.  So that’s why I’m counting on you. I’m counting on the AFT.  I’m counting on the American public to make sure as many people as possible get registered to vote, get educated, and get mobilized.

Today I announced a nationwide effort by my campaign to get more than 3 million Americans to register and commit to vote in November.  We would love your help. Please go to Hillaryclinton.com/vote to get involved.  And then let’s keep going.  Let’s keep making our case, working for better schools, more resources, more support, to give all of our kids the chance that they deserve.  With your help, we’re going to make sure we get to work on that agenda together, because we’re going to make sure we don’t turn our country over to Donald Trump.  Let’s go win in November.  Thank you all very, very much.”

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At the 107th Annual NAACP Convention at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati., Hillary Clinton spoke of recent shootings of civilians, assaults on police, and systemic racism.

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At NAACP Convention, Hillary Clinton Condemns Recent Shootings of Police; Reiterates Call to Work Together for Needed Reforms

At the NAACP National Convention in Cincinnati on Monday, Hillary Clinton forcefully condemned the recent police shootings, including the killing of officers Brad Garafola, Matthew Gerald, and Montrell Jackson in Baton Rouge. Clinton reiterated the pressing need to support our law enforcement officers, reform our criminal justice system, and pass common sense gun laws to keep our communities and police officers safe.  As Clinton said, “So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. [….] We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.”

In addition, Clinton announced a nationwide voter mobilization goal to register and commit to vote more than 3 million voters to be a part of this campaign. In the kickoff week alone, Hillary for America and the state Democratic coordinated campaigns will host more than 500 registration or commit to vote events across the country.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello, NAACP! It is so good to be here with all of you.

I want to start by thanking my longtime friend and colleague, my collaborator, and partner, and so many important causes; Hazel Dukes is a treasure. A treasure not only for New York, but for the NAACP and for our country. Thank you so much dear Hazel.

I want to thank your Chair, Rosyln Brock. Thank you so much Madame Chair. Your President and CEO Cornell Brooks, and everyone here today, including all the elected officials who have already appeared before you and those who will be addressing you during this convention.

And I have to start by saying we all know about that other Convention happening up in Cleveland today. Well, my opponent in this race may have a different view, but there’s nowhere I’d rather be than right here with all of you.

For more than a century, you’ve been on the frontlines, pushing America to become a better, fairer country. You and your noble predecessors have marched, sat in, stood up and spoke out – all to bring us closer to our founding ideals of equality for all.

And yes we have made progress, we see the results: in classrooms where children of all races learn side by side; in boardrooms and break rooms, where workers of all backgrounds are able to earn a living and support their families; at every level of government, where more and more the people we elect to represent America actually look like America.

And, of course, in the White House, with our wonderful President and First Lady and their daughters, Barack and Michelle Obama.

So as the President has said, and indeed, as he exemplified, we’ve come a long way.  But you know – and I know – that we have so much further to go.

We were cruelly reminded of that with the tragic deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, two more black men killed by police incidents, this time in Louisiana and Minnesota. And then in Dallas, five police officers killed while serving and protecting peaceful protestors, targeted because they were police.

And we saw it again just yesterday, when three police officers were shot in an apparent ambush in Baton Rouge. This madness has to stop.

Watching the news from Baton Rouge yesterday, my heart broke not just for those officers and their grieving families, but for all of us.  Because we have difficult, painful, important work ahead of us to repair the bonds between police and communities, and between and among each other.  We need one another to do this work.  And we need leaders like the NAACP. We need police officers to help us do this work.  These murders threaten all of that.

Killing police officers is a terrible crime.  That’s why our laws treat the murders of police so seriously because they represent the rule of law itself. If you take aim at that, you take aim at all of us. Anyone who does it and anyone who helps must be held accountable.  And as president, I will bring the full weight of the law to bear in making sure that those who kill a police officer are brought to justice.  There can be no justification.  No looking the other way.  We all have to make sure and pray it ends.

The officers killed yesterday in Baton Rouge were named Montrell Jackson, Matthew Gerald, Brad Garafola.  When they died, they were responding to a call about a man with a gun.  How many families, how many more families, would pay the price if we didn’t have brave men and women answering those calls?  That’s why I’m haunted by the images of what the officers were doing in Dallas when they died.  Protecting a peaceful march, talking with the protestors. Where would our democracy be without courageous people willing to do that?

So we all need to be partners in making law enforcement as secure and effective as it needs to be. That means investing in our police – in training on the proper use of force, especially lethal force. How to avoid using force to resolve incidents.

Officer safety and wellness – everything they need to do their jobs right and rebuild trust with their communities.  I’ve said from the beginning of my campaign, that will be my priority as President.

Perhaps the best way to honor our police is to follow the lead of police departments across the country striving to do better.  The deaths of Alton and Philando drove home how urgently we need to make reforms to policing and criminal justice — how we cannot rest until we root out implicit bias and stop the killings of African Americans.

Because there is, as you know so well, another hard truth at the heart of this complex matter. Many African Americans fear the police. I can hear you, some of you in this room. And today there are people all across America sick over what happened in Baton Rouge and in Dallas. But also fearful that the murders of police officers mean that vital questions about police-community relations will go unanswered.

Now that is a reasonable fear isn’t it? All of this tells us very powerfully that something needs to change. Many police officers across the country agree with that. There’s a real opportunity here for cooperation.

But that can only happen if we can build trust and accountability. And let’s admit it. That gets harder every time someone else is killed.

So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. I know that the NAACP, and so many of you individually, will do all you can to help our nation heal and start the work together to meet these challenges.

We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.

And let’s admit it, there is clear evidence that African-Americans are disproportionately killed in police incidents than any other group.  And African-American men are far more likely to be stopped and searched by police, charged with crimes, and sentenced to longer prison terms than white men convicted of the same offenses.  These facts tell us something is profoundly wrong. We can’t ignore that. We can’t wish it away. We have to make it right.

That means end-to-end reform in our criminal justice system – not half-measures, but a full commitment with real follow through. That’s why the very first speech I gave in this campaign, back in April of 2015 was about criminal justice reform. And the next President should make a commitment to fight for the reforms we so desperately need. Holding police departments like Ferguson accountable. Requiring accurate data on in-custody deaths, like Sandra Bland. Creating clear, national guidelines on the use of force, especially legal force. Supporting independent investigations of fateful encounters with the police. So I pledge to you, I will start taking action on day one and every day after that until we get this done.

And you know what? When the 24-hour news cycle moves on, I won’t. This is too important. This goes to the heart of who we are. This is about our character as Americans. That’s why we also need to fix the crisis of mass incarceration. Eliminate the disparity in sentencing between crack and powder cocaine. Dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline that starts in school and diverts too many African American kids out of school and into the criminal justice system, instead of giving them the education they deserve to have. And we need to do, all of us need to do – and I look forward to working with the NAACP – we need to do a much better job of helping people who’ve paid their debt to society find jobs and support when they get out.

America is well known, and we want to be a land of second chances – but so many Americans never had a first chance to begin with.  So let’s give everyone a fair chance at rebuilding their lives.  As Abraham Lincoln said, ‘Give everyone a fair chance in the race of life.’ My plan would make significant investments in reentry programs for the formerly incarcerated.  And I will ‘Ban the box’ in the federal government. People deserve a real shot at an interview instead of being told ‘No,’ right out of the gate.

Then beyond criminal justice, we must, we must fight for commonsense reforms to stop gun violence. This is by far, gun violence, by far the leading cause of death for young African-American men, outstripping the next nine causes of death combined.  The wrong people, the wrong people keep getting their hands on guns.  And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind the Dallas shooter had, which allowed him to outgun the police.

That’s why the Cleveland police, yesterday, demanded that the state suspend open carry of guns on the streets during the Republican National Convention.  And last week, the extraordinary and inspiring Dallas police chief, Chief Brown, told lawmakers, ‘Do your job. We’re doing ours,’ he said.  He’s right.  When he went on to say we’re putting our lives on the line. We’ve got to do better.

People who should care about protecting of police officers should be committed to getting assault weapons off the streets to start with.  And they should join us in instituting comprehensive background checks because law enforcement officers are nearly 50 percent, nearly 50 percent, less likely to be killed in states where there are checks on the purchase of handguns.

But even if we succeed in passing these laws and implementing them, we’ve got to go even further than that.

We need to do something about the racial inequities in our healthcare system.  Right now, black kids are 500 percent more likely to die from asthma than white kids – 500 percent! Right now a black baby in South Carolina is twice as likely to die before her first birthday as a white baby.  Imagine if those numbers were reversed, and it were white kids dying.  Imagine the outcry and the resources that would flood in.

And let’s do everything we can to create more jobs in places where unemployment remains stubbornly high after generations of underinvestment and neglect.  I’m a big fan of Congressman Jim Clyburn’s ‘10-20-30’ plan – steering 10 percent of federal investment to neighborhoods where 20 percent of the population has been living below the poverty line for 30 years.

That should go nationwide because the unemployment rate among young African Americans is twice as high as for young white people. And because of that, my plan also includes $20 billion aimed specifically at creating jobs for young people. If you don’t get that first job, it’s hard to get the second job, and it’s hard to build that solid financial base.

And because of the Great Recession, the median wealth for black families is now just a tiny fraction of the median wealth for white families.  That’s why my plan includes steps to help more African-American families buy a home, which has always been one of the surest ways to build wealth and security for a family.

We will do more to support black entrepreneurs get access to capital. And I want to give a shout out to black women, who represent the fastest-growing segment of women-owned businesses in America.

I want to unleash all of that energy and all of that talent. We need to view all of these issues also as part of the struggle for civil rights. Rosa Parks opened up every seat on the bus: our challenge now is to expand jobs so that everyone can afford the fare.  And let’s ensure that the bus route reaches every neighborhood, and connects every family with safe, affordable housing, good jobs, and quality schools.

Now, I know none of this will surprise those of you who know me. I’ve got a lot of plans. You can go to my website, Hillary-Clinton-dot-com and read our full agenda.

Because you see, I have this old-fashioned idea: if you’re running for President, you should say exactly what you want to do and how you will get it done.  I do sweat the specifics because I think they matter.  Whether one more kid gets health care, one more person finds a job, or one more woman entrepreneur gets access to capital to follow her dream – those just may be details in Washington, but it really matters to those people and their families.

And the truth is, we need to plan because we face a complex set of economic, social and political challenges: they’re intersectional; they’re reinforcing.  We’ve got to take them all on. We can’t wait and just do one at a time.

But the answers won’t just come from Washington.  Ending systemic racism requires contributions from all of us – especially, especially those of us who haven’t experienced it ourselves.

I’ve been saying this for a while now – and I’m going to keep saying it, because I think it’s important.  We white Americans need to do a better job of listening when African Americans talk about the seen and unseen barriers you face every day.

We need to recognize our privilege and practice humility, rather than assume that our experiences are everyone’s experiences.

We all need to try, as best we can, to walk in one another’s shoes – to imagine what it would be like to sit our son or daughter down and have ‘the talk’ about how carefully they need to act around police because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or even killed.

Let’s also put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to do a dangerous job that their families pray will bring them home safe at night. Empathy works both ways.  We’ve got to try to see the world through their eyes, too.

When you get right down to it, that’s what makes it possible for people from every background, every race, every religion, to come together as one nation.  It’s what makes our country endure.

And in times like these we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.  I will work every single day to do just that. And what I’m about to say, I say with no satisfaction, the Republican nominee for President will do the exact opposite.

He might say otherwise if he were here.  But of course, he declined your invitation.

So all we can go on is what he has said and done in the past.

Donald Trump led the movement to de-legitimize our first black president, trumpeting the so-called ‘birther’ movement.

Donald Trump plays coy with white supremacists.  Donald insults Mexican immigrants, even an American judge born of Mexican heritage.  Donald Trump demeans women.  Donald Trump wants to ban an entire religion from entering our country.

And Donald Trump loves to talk to the press.  But let’s not forget, let us not forget: the first time Donald Trump was quoted in The New York Times was in 1973, when the Justice Department went after his company for refusing to rent apartments to African Americans.

It was one of the largest federal cases of its kind at the time. And when federal investigators spoke with Trump’s employees, they said they were instructed to mark rental applications from black people with a ‘C.’ A ‘C’ for colored.

By now, we’ve heard a lot of troubling things about Donald Trump but that one’s shocking.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln.  And we are watching it become the Party of Trump.  And that’s not just a huge loss to our democracy – it is a threat to our democracy.

And it all adds up, it all adds up to an undeniable conclusion:  I don’t care if you’re a Democrat, a Republican, an Independent — Donald Trump cannot become President of the United States.

And that’s why we’ve got to work together to get out the vote this fall.

You know that better than anyone.  That’s why the theme of this conference is ‘Our Lives Matter, Our Votes Count.’

I agree with both of that. And now I think your votes count more than ever.

That’s why we’ve got to stand up against any attempt to roll back the clock on voting rights.  Encourage everyone, everyone we know to stand up and be counted in this November election.

As Dr. King said, ‘Our lives begin to end when we become silent about things that matter.’  None of us, none of us, can afford to be silent with so much at stake.

That’s why, here today, I am pleased to announce a nationwide drive to get 3 million people to register to vote and to commit to vote in this election.

We are hosting more than 500 registration events this week, across the country. We’re going to minor league baseball games, college campuses, barbershops, hair salons, street corners. And with those we cannot connect with in person, we’ve created an online, one stop shop registration tool, in English and in Spanish.

And my team in Ohio wanted me to make sure you all know that we’re hiring.  We actually have a recruiter here today – he’s got a table set up in the hall.  We’re hiring paid organizers to help us get out the vote and get our message out all across Ohio. So please spread the word – we want great people on our team.  That’s the way we’re going to be successful. We’re not the red team or the blue team, we’re the American team, and it’s time we start acting like it.

I have no doubt we can rise to meet these challenges if we stand together– no doubt at all. And if we are looking for inspiration, let’s go to one of the officers killed yesterday. 10 days ago, Montrell Jackson, a young African American police officer in Baton Rouge, posted a message on Facebook, he wrote so honestly and powerfully about the struggle of being black and wearing blue in today’s America.

‘I’m tired,’ he wrote, ‘in uniform I get nasty, hateful looks, and out of uniform, they consider me a threat.’ He went on, ‘These are trying times, please don’t let hate infect your heart. I’m working in these streets, so any protesters, officers, friends, families, or whoever, if you see me,’ Montrell said, ‘and need a hug, or want to say a prayer, I’ve got you.’

That, my friends, is the strength of America. Men like Montrell Jackson. Despite all our challenges, that spirit of love and community must guide us still. We have to heal the divides that remain, make the United States what it should be, stronger and fairer. More opportunity for every one of our people. I would not be standing here on the brink of accepting the Democratic nomination if I did not believe, if I did not in my heart believe, that America’s best years are still ahead of us. So let us go forward with faith, with confidence, with optimism. Our children and our grandchildren deserve no less.

Thank you, God bless you and God bless the United States of America.”

 

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Hillary Clinton’s day began with an appearance at the League of United Latin American Citizens Convention in Washington, DC.

At LULAC, Clinton Doubles Down on Expanding the President’s Executive Actions on Immigration

During her remarks at the 87th LULAC National Convention in Washington, D.C., Clinton not only discussed her commitment to make DAPA a reality, but also announced that she will double down on her plan to expand on the President’s executive actions and create a straightforward system in which people with sympathetic cases – or a history of service to their communities – can make their case and be eligible for deferred action. In addition, in her first 100 days, Clinton will put a comprehensive immigration reform bill before Congress that includes a pathway to citizenship, fixes the family visa backlog, and strengthens our economy. It will address all aspects of the system – including immigrants living here today, and those who will come in the days ahead – from highly-skilled workers to family members, to those seeking refuge from violence, or striving for a better life.

At the end of her remarks, and pointing to Trump’s divisive and hateful rhetoric towards Latinos, Clinton was joined onstage by members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and community leaders who held sings reading “I am American.” Together, these Members of Congress sent a very clear message to the Republican candidate: Latinos are just as American as Donald Trump.</span>

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below: “Wow, it is so great being here with all of you today. Thank you. I love you all too. I am so glad to see you gathered here. I want to thank your President, Roger Rocha, and your Executive Director, Brent Wilkes, and let’s give another round of applause to Lizeth for sharing her story.  I believe that more people in our country need to hear from Lizeth and other DREAMers across America. These young people are so important to our future. I told her I was really proud of her and I’m sure that her family and her parents in particular are very proud as well. And thank all of you for helping to make LULAC the united and energized organization it is today.  For 87 years, you have been on the frontlines. Now I haven’t been around all of those 87 years, but I am proud to stand alongside you for part of that journey. There are a lot of people I know in this audience: people who have served as President and officers at LULAC, women who have led the women’s movement here out of LULAC. Back in the ‘90s, we worked together to achieve universal health care. We fought the good fight.  And when were defeated, we got right back up, and you helped us pass the Children’s Health Insurance Program that covers 8 million children in America today. I remember this very well because I worked with your leadership. Back then, LULAC made signs that read, ‘Let’s move forward with Clinton.’  Now, I found that very flattering. But I asked back then if we could please change the signs to ‘Let’s move forward together.’ Because that was more accurate. Because everything we achieved, we achieved together. And that’s how we’re going to write the next chapter of the American story, to put opportunity within reach of every family. We are going to do that together. And I for one, want, I want all Americans, from all backgrounds, to help chart that future. And I hope and expect that Latinos will play a leading role. Now you know this, but it bears repeating, you represent one of the fastest growing minority groups in America. By 2050, communities of color will represent the majority of our population.  So of course Latinos have to help us shape the future of America because you are the future of America. Now I know from my own work going back decades that when we invest in this community – when we make it easier for Latinos to get an education, compete for jobs, start and grow new businesses and pursue your dreams – all of America benefits. That’s why I’m making to you two commitments for what I’ll do in the first 100 days of my Administration. First, we will make the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II – with support specifically for Latino-owned small businesses. And I will also introduce legislation for comprehensive immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship. These two top priorities are what I have heard as I have traveled across the country, meeting with groups large and small. People who say, ‘Hey we want to succeed, we want to start a small business, we want to create more opportunity.’ And we need once and for all to end the vicious debate about comprehensive immigration reform. So first, with respect to jobs. We need to create an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top.  And we have to do this together as well. You know that better than anyone.  Latinos are 17 percent of our country’s population – but you hold only 2 percent of its wealth. There’s a disconnect here. We’ve got to connect more Latinos with good jobs that pay good wages, with more opportunities to go to college, like Lizeth, to launch new ventures, and build wealth that you can pass on to your kids. Now, there are lots of ways of doing that, aren’t there? Well, one of the best ways is to face the fact that America’s infrastructure is crumbling. We need to rebuild. And we need to build our clean energy infrastructure, so we can increase efficiency, cut costs for consumers, and compete and win in the 21st-century green economy.  It just so happens that more than a quarter of all construction jobs in America are held by Latinos.  My plan will create thousands more jobs in these sectors, putting people to work rebuilding America. That is about the kind of future that we want together. And I have a special place in my heart for small businesses. My dad was a small businessman, very small. But he worked so hard and gave us a very solid, middle class life. So I want to do more to support Latino-owned small businesses, which have created so many jobs and so much growth across America. I have a plan to cut red tape, increase access to capital, and invest $25 billion to support innovation in communities that need that the most. That’s what we will do together. While we’re doing all that, creating these jobs, which is good for everybody in America. While we’re at it, let’s finally give workers a raise.  It’s time to raise the minimum wage. No one who works full-time in America should ever live in poverty. The presumptive Republican nominee doesn’t believe we need to raise the minimum wage. In fact he has said wages are too high in America. Yes, exactly. And you know what else we need to do? We need to close the gender pay gap. This inequality of pay affects all women, but it is hardest on women of color. And hardest most of all on Latinas.  On average, Latinas earn just 55 cents for every dollar earned by a white man.  That is just outrageous. I know you understand this, and I am going to campaign on this across America in front of every audience. Because one of the fastest ways to raise income is to ensure equal pay. And people who say to me, ‘Well that’s a woman’s issue’ are missing the whole point. If you have a mother, a wife, a sister, or a daughter who is not being paid fairly, it’s your issue, it’s a family issue and it’s an American economic issue. And at a time when education is more important than ever, let’s make sure no one is forced to give up their dream of going to college because they can’t afford to pay.  Over the last 20 years the number of Latinas going to college has tripled. We should applaud, that is a big accomplishment. Yet here is the catch, Latinos are still less likely than their white peers to graduate, often because they can’t afford to. That’s heartbreaking, isn’t it? I think we’ve gone backwards in many ways. We don’t provide enough help to students who really need it. My plan will change that. We’re going to make community college free. And we’re going to make public universities debt free. Now here’s what that means. For families making less than $125,000 a year, we will eliminate tuition altogether at public colleges and universities. We will also help those of you who already have debt refinance it and pay it back with more help. Now, also, in my first 100 days, as part of my commitment, I will introduce comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship. I want to say I know how painful it was when the Supreme Court made the decision it made. So many families had hoped that it would be different. And there is a lot of worry and concern across our country. So let me say this. We do, in my opinion, have a consensus that something must be done. Whether we get it done will depend on this election. For a long time the question of whether to reform our immigration system was hotly contested. Now there’s greater agreement, except in some circles. I deeply regret the kind of campaign the presumptive Republican nominee started with and is still running today. So part of what we have to be strong in standing for is a credible path forward for reform that is truly comprehensive, addressing all aspects of the system, including immigrants living here today, those who wish to come in the days ahead, from highly-skilled workers to family members, to those seeking refuge from violence, wherever that might occur. To families, this is an issue that matters more than we can measure. So there’s nothing that I take more seriously. I will send a proposal to Congress that will include a path to citizenship. That will fix the family visa backlog and strengthen our economy. And will enable our country to be what it’s always been – a place where people from around the world can come to start new businesses, pursue their dreams, apply their talents to American growth and innovation. And while we’re doing that, we must do everything we can to keep families already here together. So when the Supreme Court put DAPA on hold, and that affected 5 million immigrants, and it was devastating for millions of families.  But it’s important to note the Court did not actually rule on the substance of the case.  I’ve said throughout this campaign that DAPA is squarely within the President’s authority. And I will keep saying that and fighting for it.

There’s more we can do.  We need a simple, straightforward system where people with sympathetic cases or can show a history of service to their communities can make their case, and be eligible for deferred action.  Like people who experience and report extreme labor abuses. And we absolutely must end family detention, close private detention facilities, stop the raids and round-ups.  These actions are not consistent with our values.  Too many children in our country say goodbye to their parents every morning, not knowing if Mom or Dad will be there when they get home. I know how important family is, and I want to do everything I can as President to keep families together. That’s one of the many reasons to finally get immigration reform through. There’s nothing more important to these families that live in fear and anxiety. Now jobs and immigration reform are just two of the issues that are at stake in this election.  What happens this November really matters my friends. Now, I think that’s true in every Presidential election. But this one is different, isn’t it? We’re not just choosing a President and Commander in Chief this fall.  The choice we make will say a lot about who we are and whether we understand and celebrate the diversity in our country, which makes us all the stronger. After the last election, the Republicans commissioned a major report, telling them everything they did wrong and what they’d need to do in order to win next time.  One of the conclusions of that report was that Republicans had to work harder to appeal to Latino voters. Next week in Cleveland, they will nominate someone who thinks ‘Latino outreach’ is tweeting a picture of a taco bowl. What a difference a few years makes. Donald Trump is temperamentally unfit to be President of the United States. Let’s just remember why that is so. In the first weeks of his campaign, he said that immigrants from Mexico are drug dealers, rapists, murderers, carriers of infectious disease. He referred to a Latina contestant in his Miss Universe pageant as ‘Miss Housekeeping.’ He insists – and I quote – ‘this is a country where we speak English, not Spanish.’  Well I have to tell you he doesn’t know much about our history and what a great opportunity we give to people from everywhere to come to this country. He criticized Jeb Bush for speaking – quote –‘Mexican.’ You can’t make this up. He wants to revoke the citizenship of 4 million Americans born in this country to immigrant parents, eliminate the bedrock principle in the 14th Amendment of the Constitution – that if you’re born in America, you’re a citizen of America.  Now, I don’t know if you read about his visit recently to Capitol Hill to try to assuage the concerns of some of the House and Senate members. But he was asked a serious question by one of those members – what did he think about Article I of the Constitution and the powers that it described. He said, ‘I like Article 1, Article II, Article XII.’ Well, there is no Article XII. I kind of have this old-fashioned idea that if you raise your hand to be sworn in as President to defend and protect the Constitution of the United States, you should know what is in the Constitution of the United States. Now, I often mention the 11 million people he wants to round up and deport.  But if you add in the more than 4 million Americans whose citizenship he wants to revoke, it’s closer to 16 million.  Never mind that this crazy idea could cost us nearly a trillion dollars in economic output.  He is talking about undoing a fundamental value of our nation. Then there are his attacks against Judge Curiel, the distinguished judge in the fraud lawsuit against the so-called Trump University.  Judge Curiel was born in Indiana. Last time I checked, it was part of the United States. His parents were born in Mexico.  So, as far as Donald’s concerned, that means Judge Curiel can’t be trusted to do his job.  He says that the judge should be disqualified because of his, and I quote, ‘Mexican heritage.’  Those are his words.  He called him a ‘Mexican judge’ over and over again.  It was a cynical, calculated attempt to fan the flames of racial division. And also to undermine people’s faith in our judicial system.  Why would someone running for President want to do that? Even the Republican Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan, called Trump’s comments, ‘the textbook definition of a racist comment.’ I will say what Donald Trump won’t say.  Judge Curiel is as American as I am. And as American as Donald Trump is. So just listen closely because when Trump talks about making America great again, that is code for taking us back to a time when racial minorities, and women, were marginalized, ostracized, treated as less than the full citizens, the full participants, the full human beings that we are. Now he’s making unfortunately, an impression on our children, toohttp://break or dad or teacher about how to talk to their kids about Trump.  In one recent survey, two-thirds of teachers reported that their students – especially those from immigrant families – feel afraid about what this election will mean for their futures. When our kids are scared by our policy debates, that’s a sign something has gone badly off the rails. It matters when at a high school sporting event in Indiana and Wisconsin, Latino teenagers are subjected to chants of ‘Build the wall!’  And ‘Speak English.’ Donald Trump is running the most divisive campaign of our lifetimes.  His message is that you should be afraid – afraid of people whose ethnicity is different, whose religious faith is different, or who were born in a different country. That’s, my friends, no innuendo or dog-whistle anymore.  It’s all out in the open now. So we have to come back twice as strong and twice as clear. We have to say with one voice that Latinos are a vital part of the American community. And we saw that so tragically again last week. When shots rang out in Dallas last week, brave police officers ran into the gunfire.  One of them was a man named Patrick Zamarripa.  He was a Navy veteran.  He served three tours in Iraq.  He had a 2-year old daughter.  And he was very proud of his Mexican heritage.  On July 4th, in what would turn out to be his final tweet, this is what he wrote: ‘Happy Birthday to the greatest country on the face of this planet.  My beloved America!’ That is the Latino community.  Loving.  Dedicated.  Proud.  Patriotic. Whether you’re Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Afro-Latino, from Central or South America,  whether your family just arrived or has been here since before the United States even existed, we are brothers and sisters, and I will be your champion. We are not strangers. You are not intruders. You’re our neighbors, our colleagues, our friends, our families. You make our nation stronger, smarter, and more creative. I want you to know I see you, I hear you, and I am with you. And together, together we must send a resounding message to Donald Trump in November and earn a decisive mandate against demagoguery and fear. It’s not enough to just complain, it’s not enough to talk to friends and neighbors or make speeches. We need to inspire a level of turnout that will help us win up and down the ticket. That will lead to more supportive state and local officials, who can put a stop to aggressive, anti-immigration measures.  That will lead to more Senators and Representatives helping us craft immigration reform, and a Congress that will actually pass it. So I’m going to work my heart out, but I need your help. I need you at my side.  Because this is your election.  That’s why the work that LULACis doing to help register voters is so critical.  That’s why I’m fighting for automatic voter registration. When you leave this conference please go home and figure out what you can do to be a part of the LULAC registration movement. Let’s move forward together once more, toward a future built on the ‘kindness and compassion’ that Cesar Chavez envisioned, toward the ‘social change’ that Dolores Huerta marched for, toward a future that reflects that simple, timeless notion that all of us are equal. Judge Curiel is an American. Patrick Zamarripa was an American. Lizeth is an American. We are all proud Americans. And the promise of America is big enough for all of us. Let’s go forth and make that clear in the election of 2016. Thank you. God bless you!”

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Hillary Clinton returned to the Old Statehouse in Springfield, Illinois today to address divisions in America and how to bridge them. It is her second campaign event in the historic hall where Lincoln delivered his “house divided” speech.  In March, Chris Matthews moderated her town hall in that historic location.

 

In Springfield, Hillary Clinton Aims to Bridge Divides in America

Clinton Argued that Trump Is Transforming the Party of Lincoln into the Party of Trump

During a speech at the Old State House in Springfield, Illinois on Wednesday—the site of Abraham Lincoln’s “House Divided” speech—Hillary Clinton addressed the challenges we face as a nation—including on race, economic inequality, and divisiveness.  She also spoke of the need for a president who will bring us together, not tear us apart. From Trump’s ban on Muslims to his promotion of anti-Semitic images pushed by neo-Nazis, Clinton argued that a Trump presidency would be a threat to our democracy and have dangerous repercussions in America and around the globe. Clinton also acknowledged the one-year anniversary of Illinois native Sandra Bland’s passing, reiterating her call for rebuilding trust between law enforcement and communities.

Pointing to the need to unite against Trump’s fear-mongering, Clinton said, “If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire [….] But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all. And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello! Hi. Thank you all very, very much, please be seated, it’s wonderful being back here. It’s always a special privilege having grown up in Chicago in the suburbs to be here in the state capitol and especially here in this great historic place filled with so much meaning, not just for Illinois but for our country. And I’m delighted to have this opportunity to talk with you about the state of our country today.

Nearly 160 years ago, Abraham Lincoln gave a speech in this statehouse that marked a turning point in the political life of our nation.

The question of slavery was being fiercely debated across America. Roughly half the states allowed it. Half abolished it. And some people – including Lincoln – believed that until it was gone entirely, our country would never be truly united and at peace.

So on June 16, 1858, when Mr. Lincoln kicked off his campaign for the United States Senate, he delivered an address on how slavery was tearing our country apart. And that it must go. Some thought that he ended up losing that Senate race because of that speech. But then he won the Presidency. And some thought it was because of that speech.

President Lincoln led America during the most challenging period in our nation’s history. He defended our Union, our Constitution, and the ideal of a nation ‘conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.’ His legacy included laws and amendments that enshrined those values for future generations. They protect and guide us still.

I’m here today, in this place, because the words Lincoln spoke all those years ago still hold resonance for us now.

Remember, he said, ‘A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect,’ he went on, ‘The Union to be dissolved; I do not expect the house to fall. But I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.’

The challenges we face today do not approach those of Lincoln’s time. Not even close. And we should be very clear about that.

But recent events have left people across America asking hard questions about whether we are still a house divided.

Despite our best efforts and highest hopes, America’s long struggle with race is far from finished.  In just the past week, we saw black men killed by police and five police officers killed by a sniper targeting white police. There is too much violence and hate in our country. Too little trust and common ground. It can feel impossible to have the conversations we need to have, to fix what’s broken.

And despite being the richest country on earth, we have too much economic inequality – and that also undermines the foundation of our democracy.

Lincoln understood that threat, too. He deeply believed everyone deserved – in his words – ‘a fair chance in the race of life.’ He saw it as a defining feature of the United States, and believed it was vital that hard-working people be free to enjoy the fruits of their own labor. It’s one of the reasons he was so strongly against slavery – because it violated that entire notion. And as President, he took pains to use the tools of government to create more economic opportunity for Americans at every level of society. So, too, must we fight inequality and create opportunity in our time – not just for some Americans, but for all.

So I come today as a mother and a grandmother to two beautiful little children. Who, I want them and all our children to grow up in a country where violence like the kind we saw last week doesn’t happen again – and where the American Dream is big enough for everyone.

I’m also here as a candidate for President who is deeply concerned about the divisions that still hold our people apart and our nation back. I believe that our future peace and prosperity depends on whether we meet this moment with honesty and courage.

That means taking a hard look at our laws and our attitudes. It means embracing policies that promote justice for all people, and standing firm against any attempt to roll back the clock on the rights and opportunities that so many sacrificed so much to secure.

And all of that starts with doing a better job of listening to each other.

We need to listen to the families whose loved ones have been killed in police incidents. Alton Sterling and Philando Castile are just the latest in a long and painful litany of African Americans dying after encounters with police officers. We remember Laquan McDonald, killed in Chicago a year and a half ago and Sandra Bland, who grew up in Illinois who died one year ago today. Time after time, no one is held accountable. And surely we can all agree that’s deeply wrong and needs to change.

And yes we do need to listen to those who say ‘Black Lives Matter.’ Too many black Americans, especially young men, feel like their lives are disposable. And they worry every single day about what might happen. They have reason to feel that way. And it’s absolutely unacceptable. Everyone in America, everyone deserves to be treated with respect and dignity. Surely that is something we can all unite behind.

We need to acknowledge the five Latinos who also lost their lives in police incidents last week. Their stories didn’t get national media coverage, but their families and communities are mourning too.

And at the same time, we need to listen to the dedicated, principled police officers working hard every day to rebuild trust with the communities they serve and protect. Our men and women in blue put their lives on the line everyday to keep us safe and keep our democracy strong. Remember what Michael Krol, Michael Smith, Lorne Ahrens, Brent Thompson and Patrick Zamarripa were doing when they died. They were protecting a peaceful march. They were people cloaked in authority making sure their fellow citizens could exercise their right to protest authority. And there’s nothing more vital to our democracy than that. And they gave their lives for it.

David Brown, the Dallas police chief, said that when it comes to overcoming systemic racism and so many other problems in society, we ask too much of the police and too little of everyone else. I think he’s absolutely right. This is our problem, and we all need to work together to solve it.

We also need to listen to the families crying out for relief from gun violence. President Obama’s trip to Dallas yesterday was the 11th time he has spoken to a city in mourning after a mass shooting. The wrong people keep getting their hands on guns. And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind that the Dallas killer had, which allowed him to outgun the police. And the vast majority of gun owners agree: we have to come together around common sense steps to prevent gun violence. If we’re looking for common ground – this is common ground. And I hope that we will, from Washington, to Springfield to everywhere across America, come to agreement about that.

Now I understand that just saying these things together may upset some people. I’m talking about police reform just a few days after a horrific attack on police officers. I’m talking about courageous, honorable police officers just a few days after officer-involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota. I’m bringing up guns in a country where just talking about comprehensive background checks and getting assault weapons off our streets gets you demonized.

But all these things can be true at the same time.

We do need criminal justice reform to save lives and to make sure all Americans are treated as equals in rights and dignity. We do need to support our police departments that are trying to get it right, and honor the men and women who protect us every day. We do need to do more to stop gun violence. We may disagree about how to do these things, but surely we can all agree with those basic premises. And I hope and pray the past week has showed us how true they are.

Now, these are the issues on many of our minds right now. And if we stop there, that would leave us with plenty of work to do.

So I wish I could say that was everything that we must address.

But these events are taking place against a much broader backdrop of fear and anxiety. So I think we have to face all of it.

We do need to make sure our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top. The changes that have roiled our economy over the past few decades are not just numbers on a page that economists study. They are real forces that families are dealing with up close and personal every day.

Not long ago, I met with factory workers here in Illinois whose jobs are being sent abroad, and heard how painful the consequences have been for them and their families. I’ve talked to workers across our country who’ve seen good jobs lost to technologies, who keep being told to get more training – even though that often doesn’t lead to a good new job on the other end.

These economic disruptions have stripped too many people of their sense of security and dignity. And that can have devastating consequences. We have to ask ourselves, why are drug addiction and suicide on the rise in parts of our country? That’s not just about economics. It’s about something deeper, that is connected to economics: a sense of dislocation, even a pessimism about whether America still holds anything for them or cares about them at all.

That’s why I’ve pledged that in my first 100 days as President, we will make the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II. We need more jobs you can support a family on, especially in places that have been left out and left behind from Coal Country to Indian Country to inner cities, to every place that’s been hollowed out when a factory closed or a mine shut down because everyone in America deserves that ‘fair chance in the race of life’ that President Lincoln described.

Now, I realize that our politics have contributed to the sense of division many Americans feel right now. And as someone in the middle of a hotly fought political campaign, I cannot stand here and claim that my words and actions haven’t sometimes fueled the partisanship that often stands in the way of progress. So I recognize I have to do better too.

I’m running for President with the belief that we need to face up to these challenges and fix them in order to become a stronger, fairer country. And in times like these, we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.

And that is why I believe Donald Trump is so dangerous.

His campaign is as divisive as any we have seen in our lifetimes. It is built on stoking mistrust and pitting American against American. It’s there in everything he says and everything he promises to do as President.

It’s there in how he wants to ban Muslims from coming to the United States, and toyed with creating a database to track Muslims in America. It’s there in the way he demeans women, in his promotion of an anti-Semitic image pushed by neo-Nazis, and in the months that he spent trying to discredit the citizenship and legitimacy of our first black President. Last night in an interview, he said that he understands systemic bias against black people because – and I quote – ‘even against me, the system is rigged’ – unquote. He went on to say, ‘I can relate to it very much myself.’  Even this – the killing of people – is somehow all about him.

It’s there in his proposals on immigration. He says he’ll round up 11 million people and kick them out. He’s actually described a special deportation force that would go around America, pulling people out of their homes and workplaces, pulling children out of school. I got a letter from a mother the other day who said her adopted son asked her with a shaky voice if President Trump would send him back to Ethiopia. When kids are scared by political candidates and policy debates, it’s a sign something has gone badly wrong.

And we see it in the violence that Donald Trump encouraged toward protesters at his rallies, and the strange things he has said about the violence that will occur if we don’t elect him. He says that if he doesn’t win this November, we – and again I quote – ‘won’t even have a country anymore,’ America’s ‘not going to continue to survive.’  I do not know what he’s talking about. But I do know we don’t need that kind of fear-mongering – not now, not ever.

And he’s gone even further even than that. He has taken aim at some of our most cherished democratic values and institutions. He wants to revoke the citizenship of 4 million Americans born in this country to immigrant parents, and eliminate the bedrock principle enshrined in the 14th Amendment – that if you’re born in America, you’re a citizen of America. He said that a distinguished American, born in Indiana, a judge can’t be trusted to do his job because his parents were Mexican; he called him a ‘Mexican judge’ over and over again. He knew that the judge had been born in Indiana. But it was a cynical, calculated attempt to fan the flames of racial division. And designed to undermine people’s faith in our judicial system. Why would someone running for President want to do that?

And even that’s not all. He says, as Commander-in-Chief, he would order our troops to commit war crimes, and insisted they would follow his orders, even though that goes against decades of military training and the military code. He’s banished members of the press who have criticized him – is there any doubt he would do the same as President? Imagine if he had not just Twitter and cable news to go after his critics and opponents, but also the IRS – or for that matter, our entire military. Given what we have seen and heard, do any of us think he’d be restrained?

And he has shown contempt for and ignorance of our Constitution. Last week, he met with House Republicans in Washington to try to assuage their serious concerns about him. One member asked whether he’d protect Article I, which defines the separation of powers between Congress and the executive branch. Here’s the answer he reportedly gave: ‘I want to protect Article One, Article Two, Article Twelve.’ Well here’s the thing – there is no Article Twelve – not even close. That was a serious question, from an elected representative, and he either didn’t care enough to answer it seriously – or he didn’t know where to begin.

Even the most stalwart Republicans were alarmed by that. And well they, and we, should be.

The first thing a new President does is take an oath to ‘protect and defend’ the Constitution. To do that with any meaning, you’ve got to know what’s in it. And you’ve got to respect what’s in it.

I do wish Donald Trump would listen to other people once in awhile. He might actually learn something. But he’s made it clear – that’s not his thing. As he has said, he only listens to himself.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln. We are watching it become the Party of Trump. And that’s not just a huge loss for our democracy – it is a threat to it.

Because Donald Trump’s campaign adds up to an ugly, dangerous message to America. A message that you should be afraid – afraid of people whose ethnicity is different, or religious faith is different, or who were born in a different country or hold different political beliefs.

Make no mistake – there are things to fear in this world, and we need to be clear-eyed about them. But we are each other’s countrymen and women. We share this miraculous country. This land and its heritage is yours, mine and everyone’s – willing to pledge allegiance and understand the solemn responsibilities of American citizenship. That’s what ‘indivisible’ means – that big word that every grade school student knows – that we’re in this together, even if that’s not always easy.

So let’s think better of each other. Let’s hold together in the face of our challenges – not turn on each other or tear each other down.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to a dangerous job we need them to do.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of African Americans and Latinos, and try as best we can to imagine what it would be like if we had to have ‘the talk’ with our kids about how carefully they need to act because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or killed.

And yes, let’s put ourselves in the shoes of Donald Trump’s supporters. We may disagree on the causes and the solutions to the challenges we face – but I believe like anyone else, they’re trying to figure out their place in a fast-changing America. They want to know how to make a good living and how to give their kids better futures and opportunities. That’s why we’ve got to reclaim the promise of America for all our people – no matter who they vote for.

And let’s be more than allies to each other. Let’s take on each other’s struggles as our own.

My life’s work is built on the conviction that we are stronger together. Not separated into factions or sides. Not shouting over each other, but together. Our economy is stronger when everyone contributes to it, and everyone can benefit from the work they do. Our communities are stronger when we all pull together to solve our problems and restore our faith in each other, and by doing so in the promise of America. Our country is stronger when we work with our friends and allies to promote peace, prosperity, and security around the world.

This is an idea that goes back to the founding of America, when 13 separate colonies found a way – despite their differences – to join together as one nation. They knew they were not stronger on their own, and neither are we.

I’ve had the great delight of seeing the musical “Hamilton.” And I hope more people at least get a chance to listen to the score and to hear the words. There’s a great song by the character playing George Washington who sings, ‘History’s eyes are on us.’ That was true then, and that’s true today.

If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire. Now don’t get me wrong, fierce debates are part of who we are – they started at my dinner table with my father, and have continued ever since. It is who we are. You’re reminded of that when you read history, when you think about the Lincoln-Douglas Debates. Debate over the right way forward.

And sometimes we have to balance competing values like freedom and order, justice and security, these are complementary values of American life. That isn’t easy. Previous generations have had to overcome terrible challenges. And no one more so than Abraham Lincoln. But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.

Thank you all very much.”

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