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The Clinton/Kaine ticket was introduced in Pittsburgh by native son Mark Cuban who took the opportunity to speak about leadership and Donald Trump.  He told the crowd that leadership is not accomplished through fear and that Trump, who never outlines any plans, is bluffing.

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The bus tour carrying Hillary and Bill Clinton and Tim Kaine and Anne Holton stopped in Johnstown today. They visited Johnstown Wire where Tim Kaine joked about Trump mistaking him for former NJ Governor Tom Kean, but talked seriously about how Trump stiffed and even destroyed small businesses that had contracted with him.  Kaine’s family ran a small business when he was growing up.  He introduced Hillary, whose dad also ran a small business.

Hillary spoke on tax reform and against trickle-down policies.  She said that she has plans and that some people make fun of her for that, but it doesn’t hurt her feelings anymore.  Hillary talked about broad job creation and manufacturing initiatives. She also spoke firmly in support of organized labor and against unfair trade deals.  She will name a trade prosecutor.  Her policies will support and sustain small businesses and their job creation initiatives. She said 98% of the businesses in Pennsylvania are small businesses. If you would like to take a tour then get your tickets for bus tours from PEI, they are a lot of fun and you get to see some amazing sights.

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In Johnstown, Clinton and Kaine Contrast 100 Day Jobs Plan with Trump’s Record of Outsourcing

On the second day of their “Stronger Together” jobs-focused bus tour through Pennsylvania and Ohio, Hillary Clinton and Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia continued introducing the American people to their 100 days jobs plan, which will make the largest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II during their first 100 days in office. They visited Johnstown Wire Technologies, a factory with a record of creating jobs and investing in America. highlighting her plans to invest $10 billion to strengthen manufacturing communities like Johnstown. She also highlighted an economic analysis by a former McCain advisor that said Clinton’s plans would create over 10 million jobs in her first term alone.

Clinton and Kaine also contrasted their shared vision for an American economy that works for everyone—not just those at the top—with Trump’s long record of outsourcing products to be made overseas, instead of here in America.  As Clinton said, “Donald Trump, you hear him, he talks a big game about putting America first. Well, with all due respect, please explain to me what part of America first leads Trump to make Trump dress shirts in Bangladesh, not Ashland, Pennsylvania. Or to make Trump furniture in Turkey, not Freeburg, Pennsylvania. Or Trump picture frames in India, not Bristol, Pennsylvania.”

Tim Kaine praised Clinton’s dedication to protecting American manufacturing jobs, saying “And we’re on this tour so that we can talk about the American economy: to talk about manufacturing; to talk about the way to grow jobs and make sure everybody benefits from our economic growth, not just a few. And that’s why I admire Hillary so very, very much.”

Clinton and Kaine’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

TIM KAINE: “How you guys doing? So good to be here at Johnstown Wire, and thank you for welcoming us. I want to thank Jim and Ron. And I had a great chance to visit with Nick a little bit, and heard about what you all do. It is a treat for us to bring our bus tour here. You can see my voice has gotten a little hoarse this week. I don’t know why. It’s not like I’ve been doing a lot of talking. I want to say a special thanks to Leo Gerard, the head of the steel workers. Leo, it’s so good to have you here.

The largest steelworker union in the international, the largest […] local, is in Newport News, Virginia. Local […], which is the manufacturers who build the most complicated things on planet Earth – nuclear aircraft carriers and subs. So we’re glad to have our steel workers there in Virginia, Leo.

This has been an incredible week. And my wife, Anne, up until a couple of days ago was the Secretary of Education in Virginia, but she stepped down to campaign full time so we can get Hillary Clinton elected President. The week has been amazing, and I’m just really humbled and honored to be part of this ticket. Being asked by a public servant who is as superb as Hillary Clinton, to join her on this ticket and to do good things for the economy, to grow it so that all benefit, to make us strong in the world with stronger alliances to build a community of respect – It’s deeply humbling.

There has only been one bad thing about being asked to join this ticket. And I’ll just be blunt about it. Once I was on the ticket, Donald Trump had to decide how he was going to make fun of me. So he basically decided at a press conference a couple of days ago, it really hurt my feelings, by saying what a lousy governor of New Jersey I had been.

When you work hard in public life, and then somebody trashes your record, you feel bad. I was feeling bad for a few minutes, and I thought, ‘Wait a minute, I wasn’t governor of New Jersey. I’ve never lived in New Jersey. I was governor of Virginia.’ So then I started to feel better. You’ve got – listen, you’ve got to give the guy a break. He’s new at this. He’s still getting the briefing memos on 50 states and New Jersey’s different than Virginia. So give him time, I guess, give him time. Well, look. I took this nomination a couple of days ago, and I talked about my own background, which makes me feel proud to be here. I was talking to Jim and Ron and Nick as we came in.

I grew up in Kansas City, and my dad ran an iron-worker organized ironworking and welding shop in the stockyards of Kansas City. My mom was his best salesman. My brothers and I worked in a manufacturing business that is pretty similar to this, except a whole lot smaller. Five employees plus family and […], plus family in a good year, but I know the deep importance of manufacturing: the deep importance of cooperation between management and union labor. So that’s why I’m so glad to come here today.

And we’re on this tour so that we can talk about the American Economy: to talk about manufacturing; to talk about the way to grow jobs and make sure everybody benefits from our economic growth, not just a few. And that’s why I admire Hillary so very, very much. She —

No, please. please. Hillary also grew up in a small business family. You know, we were comparing notes. The businesses were different, but one thing’s the same if you grow up in a small business family. Everybody, it’s all hands on deck, just like this campaign.

Everybody comes down and the kids come down. If you’ve got to get an order or if it’s a holiday or a weekend and something is needed, everybody gets pressed into service. And she learned those same values growing up in her family in suburban Chicago and she’s been living them for her entire career. And she’s got just about the best life partner that you could imagine if you’re trying to serve others. Please give a great round of applause to President Clinton.

For all of us on stage and frankly for anybody who’s got their values straight, it’s not about title, it is not about money, it is not about prestige, it’s not about popularity it’s about what you can do to help folks out. And that’s why I’m so excited to be here on this tour with Hillary, Bill and my wife Anne.

For us to just be sitting on a bus shooting the breeze with Hillary and Bill Clinton – I mean, I’ve got to tell you, I’m still sort of pinching myself. And yesterday – we have a boy in the Marines who deployed overseas earlier this week. And we were able to – and […] that Nick is a Marine – we were able to get him on the phone and talk to our running mates, and man that just blew him away. That’s something that he felt so good about many time zones away.

But look, we’re here because the convention was great and Pennsylvania did a superb job. We think we know hospitality in Virginia, but Philly and Pennsylvania did a superb job.

But this is the part of the campaign I like best, not in the suit but with the jacket off and with the tie off, just going out and pounding the pavement. 100 days from now and we are pounding the pavement to make sure we win. On this bus tour, which is in Pennsylvania and Ohio, we’re talking about creating jobs, raising wages and the leadership that we need to show in order to make that possible.

In this county, you’ve got 125 to – 129 manufacturing businesses just like Johnstown Wire that employ nearly 4,000 people. And Hillary’s going to talk at some length about our ‘Make It in America’ plan that will invest $10 billion in communities just like Johnstown.

We’ll put workers first, we’ll put their wages first, we’ll put their families first. We’ll reject trade agreements like the TPP that don’t meet the standards that they ought to meet.

And we need to do something that has a direct tie to Johnstown Wire’s business, which is invest in infrastructure, so that everybody’s able to get around. We can have a power grid that works, we’ve got bridges that are solid, because these kinds of jobs and infrastructure hire people today and raise our platform of economic success down the road.

This way to build the economy so that all benefit is just one of the few issues at stake in the campaign, but it’s really the most important one, because if we can build those ladders of success for every community and every industry and every region, then our country’s going to be very, very strong.

We saw in Philadelphia this week a united Democratic Party. And look, for Dems that’s not always just an automatic. I will just be honest. We came in and there were challenges, because we are a family that doesn’t mind airing debates and having robust debates and there were challenges on Monday morning, but by Thursday night, when our candidate hit the stage, took the nomination and laid out her vision for the country, they saw the Democrats pull together behind a relentlessly upbeat and patriotic view of this country, right?

And aren’t we all patriots and aren’t we all optimists?

I think the vision we put on display was a sharp contrast from the darker and more twisted version that we saw in Cleveland and we like being the upbeat, positive people. We don’t sugarcoat stuff, we don’t whitewash challenges, but we know we can solve our challenges because of you.

This election, the stakes are very clear and the stakes are very high. It’s a choice between a leader who’s been working her entire life on behalf of families and children or somebody who’s spent his entire life watching out for himself no matter who gets hurt. There’s a story that the campaign has told of a guy named Andrew Tesoro who’s an architect. You might have seen it – there’s a video and an ad, and the reason we mention him, he lives in New York but he’s been teaching over at Carnegie Mellon, so that’s why I wanted to mention him, Donald Trump hired him as an architect to design a clubhouse for one of his golf courses, that was a huge honor to him.

He believed Donald Trump. He believed he could do good work for him, and he did. He honored his part of the bargain, he designed, and they built this clubhouse, this very nice place. But as he so often does, Donald decided, ‘Hey, I can stiff this guy.’ And even told him, ‘You know what, because you’re a nice guy, I’ll pay you half.’ You know, if he didn’t like him, he was going to pay him less than that.

And Andrew couldn’t hire the […] lawyers to go after a big machine like the Trump machine. And so I guess he figured, well, I guess, probably can’t go after him. So maybe I’ll have to settle for half. But after he did that, Trump had second thoughts about paying him half. He bullied this guy, this small business owner, this entrepreneur, he threatened him, he said he’d tie him up in court forever, and so the guy basically had to settle for virtually zip when he had already done all of the work.

He had already paid for all of his work, all of his folks, and all the entire project, and built the clubhouse that Trump gets to take advantage of and enjoy. This was a small business that took a punch because they believed Donald Trump. So when it comes to Trump there is, there are just too many stories like that, I talked about it at the convention the other night, so many people when they believed in him, they found out they got stiffed. And now he’s still saying, ‘Hey folks, believe me.’

We’ve got a candidate who respects you enough to lay out a plan, here’s what I’ll do, here’s how I’ll do it. And I thought when of the best lines that Hillary said the other night was, ‘I’ve got details, but remembers when it’s about your own kid, or it’s about your own business, it’s not a detail, it’s a big deal, and you ought to have to tell people, what you’re going to do.’

But Trump just says, ‘Look, believe me. Trust me.’ And we’d be fools to do it. I can’t help but think what would have happened if my dad’s business had been trying to do work with seven or eight employees for a guy like Trump, who just felt like he could use them and then just kick them aside, I wouldn’t have the opportunities I have today had my Dad dealt with people like that when he was running his iron-working shop.

So the last thing I’ll say before I bring up the Secretary is this: Virginia and Pennsylvania share something in common, and that is we call ourselves a commonwealth, not a state. There’s 46 states and there are four commonwealths, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Mass, and Virginia. Once when I was Lieutenant Governor I went to a school and I talked to a student just about your age, young lady, standing right in front of me, and I was in a classroom and a little girl asked me, ‘Hey, why are we a Commonwealth and everybody else is states?’

And I did what a good politician was who doesn’t know the answer, I made something up on the spot. And I said, ‘Commonwealth – a state is a dotted line, it’s geography, Commonwealth says, it’s something about our values.’ The wealth we hold, we hold in common, it’s got to be about the community. It’s got to be about bringing everybody together, and Pennsylvania, you have the boldness to say that’s how you want to be known, and in Virginia, we have the boldness to say that’s how we want to be known.

That’s our values. The wealth we hold, we hold in common, and those are Hillary Clinton’s values too. So, I’ll just ask you this last question and then bring up our next President. I think as far as it goes with the economy, we’ve got a really, really clear choice, and I’ll boil it down to this: Johnstown, Pennsylvania – do you want a ‘you’re fired’ President, or a ‘you’re hired’ President?

I mean I don’t think it could be any simpler, we’ve got a ‘you’re hired’ President in Hillary Clinton, and I’m so proud to be her running mate and I’m so proud to bring her up to talk to you! Hillary Clinton, give her a big round!

HILLARY CLINTON: 

Well I’ll tell you what, I’m glad I told Tim Kaine, ‘You’re hired,’ because you just got a great look at why the people of the Commonwealth of Virginia keep promoting him. He started off in the city council of Richmond, went on to become mayor of his hometown, got elected Lieutenant Governor then Governor, and now United States Senator, because he’s someone who really instills confidence in those whom he serves.

And as America gets to know him, that’s exactly what I think will happen as well. We’ve got an incredible week here in Pennsylvania, I can’t tell you how much I love being here.

And some of you may know that my father was from Scranton. My grandfather came as a small child from England, immigrant, to Scranton with his family. He worked in the Scranton lace mills, a factory his entire life, because he believed that he could produce a better life for his children, and he did. And every time I come to Pennsylvania, I think about the many journeys we made from where we lived, outside of Chicago, to Scranton, every single year.

We would go every summer, we went some Christmases, I was brought back, as were my brothers to be christened in the little Court Street Methodist Church, we really have a great deal of love and affection for Pennsylvania. My father plus one of my brothers played football at Penn State, so –

It’s always a joy for me to be here. And to come to Johnstown, a place that I’ve been to before and look forward to coming back and being here.

And having this opportunity to come and visit with you. I want to thank Ron and Jim for welcoming us, […] thank you for explaining some of the work you do and telling us that Nick was a Marine at Camp David when Bill was President, we’ve actually met him in his prior life, so that was a very special treat. I want to thank my friend Leo Gerard, a man who has fought for justice, for working families in America, North America, and who sets a great example, as does this company, where business and labor work together.

And Ron and Jim told me about something called gain share, where when you get more productive, get more productive, don’t have as much scrap, those gains are shared. That’s what I believe we ought to be doing in every single business in our country. So on Thursday, I was incredibly humbled and grateful to accept the Democratic Party nomination.

I have to tell you, it was pretty overwhelming to be out there and to think about the awesome responsibility of taking on the challenges facing our country, but I’m an optimist, and I’m confident, because I think if you look at American history, that’s how we get things done. It’s not the whiners and the complainers and the insulters who move our country forward. It’s the workers and the builders, it’s people who get up every day and try to figure out how it’s going to be better for them and their families.

So then yesterday, Tim and I and Anne and Bill hit the road, going across Pennsylvania — sorry we were a little late, the rain was really heavy and we have kind of a long convoy, so I apologize for that, but we are visiting places that prove what Americans can do. We have the most productive, competitive workers in the world, we just need to give our people the chance to succeed. So from Philadelphia to Hatfield to Harrisburg and now here in Johnstown, that’s exactly what we’re doing. We’re talking to people, meeting people who have each others’ backs. And you truly are the reason why I have so much confidence that America’s best days are still ahead of us, so –

It’s in stark contrast to the vision that Donald Trump is laying out, because I don’t think we’re weak. I don’t think we’re in decline. I think we can pull together because we are stronger together, and if anybody like him spent a day on the factory floor here, they’d see what teamwork looks like. They’d understand what it means to create and build.

Every day you are showing that America is home to the best products, the hardest workers, the most innovative entrepreneurs in world. And so as we are honest about our challenges here at home and abroad, let’s start from understanding that this country and our people have what it takes to get ahead and stay ahead if we have the leadership that gives us that chance. And most of all, we know better than to believe anybody that says, ‘I alone can fix it.’ Right? Those were actually Donald Trump’s words at the Republican Convention in Cleveland last week. And I think they should set off alarm bells for everybody. Because by saying that, he’s forgetting what all the rest of us do every day. He’s forgetting our troops on the front lines; our businesses who see possibilities in every problem; our unions who fight for working families every day.

He’s forgetting companies like this one who invest in employees. Americans don’t say, ‘I alone can fix it.’ We say, ‘Oh, okay. How are we going to fix this together? How are we going to raise a family, build a business, heal a community, lift a country?’ And that’s why we have to stand together. My grandfather, as I said, worked at the Scranton lace mills from the time he was a teenager, until he retired at the age of 65. It was dangerous work in those days, but he was one of the kindest and gentlest men I’ve ever known. He knew that hard work in America meant that his family would get ahead — that it would pay off.

And he was right. My dad, as I said, made it to college, made it to Penn State. Now, if he were still alive, he’d tell you it’s because he played football. But that’s okay. He got an education. He was proud to get it. He started working as a salesman, enlisting in the Navy after Pearl Harbor. And when the war was over, he started his own small business printing fabric for draperies. And it was a really small business. He would recruit my mother, my brothers and me. He had a print plant. It didn’t have any natural light. It was a pretty dark place.

But it had long tables where the fabric would be rolled out, and then the silk screens would be laid on the fabric. And then the paint for the color you wanted to put on the fabric would be poured onto the silkscreen, and then we would take squeegee. One person on one side of the table, another person at the other side — sometimes me. We’d take that squeegee. We’d roll it — you had to add exactly the right pressure to the other side of the silk screen —, lift it up, move the screen, go down the table and keep going.

I remember watching my dad standing for hours over those silk screens. Why did he do it? Because he wanted to give my brothers and me opportunities he never had. And he did. I believe every single family in America deserves that same chance in 2016.

And you know, I know we’re living in a time of really hot politics. People say all kinds of things — hateful things; insulting things. I’m sorry about that. I think we should have a much better dialogue and debate so that voters can decide which way they want to go. And sometimes, because of all of the static going back and forth, we lose track of where we are. We’ve come along way since the worst financial crisis in a generation. And it could have gotten a whole lot worse, my friends.

When I think back to 2008, I was in the Senate then, before I accepted President Elect’s offer, President Elect Obama’s offer, to become Secretary of State. We were losing 800,000 jobs. 9 million Americans lost their jobs. 5 million homes were lost. But it’s fair to say we did not know where the bottom was. Unemployment: over 10 percent. Stock market: down to 7,000. This was one of the riskiest economic moments in our country’s recent history.

And I will say it: I don’t think President Obama and Vice President Biden get the credit they deserve for doing what they had to do to save our economy.

And one thing they saved, and I’ll say it over the opposition of the Republican Party, they saved American auto industry, which is a big customer of this plant.

I found that debate back then just unbelievable. People saying, giving speeches: “Let the American auto industry just fall.” Millions of jobs were at stake — many millions more families of the people who worked in the American auto industry. And I’m proud that it was saved, and I’m even prouder that it had the best year it’s had in a long time last year on behalf of selling American-made automobiles. So that’s progress.

And I just want people, as we go into this election, to be fair. Because yes, we do have work to do. We can’t be satisfied with the status quo — I’m not. Not by a long shot. We’re still facing deep-seated problems that developed long before that recession and have stayed with us through the recovery. But let’s be fair and let’s be clear about where we’ve come from and where we need to go. And let’s not buy the same failed economic policies that got us into the mess we were in in the first place.

You know that old saying: “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.” When people come around and say they’re going to cut taxes on the wealthiest Americans, we have seen this before and it does not turn out well. And it’s about time we say, “No, we’re going to make the wealthiest Americans, for a change, pay their fair share of taxes and support America.” That’s why I’ve gone around the country talking to working families across America.

And I’ve heard all the concerns people have that, you know, the economy isn’t working it needs to. Too many people feel like they’re out on their own. Well I can tell you that Tim Kaine and I will get up every single day. We will fight for you and we will work for you. We will look out for you. How do you know that? Because I’ve actually told you what I want to do. I’m not standing here insulting my opponent and making crazy promises. I’m telling you what I want to do. I actually have plans. Some people make fun of me for having plans. Yes, it used to hurt my feelings. It doesn’t anymore.

At each of conventions, you get four days to tell the country what you want to do. That’s what they’re supposed to be for. At the Republican convention, they spent more time on insults for me than on jobs for you. Donald Trump spoke for 75 minutes and offered zero solutions. Now, I don’t think that’s good enough. I have the […] idea if you’re going to ask somebody for their vote, we owe you a clear explanation of what you’re going to get for it.

And I have said from the beginning of this campaign, my mission from first day to my last, will be to create more opportunity and more good wages that will give people a chance at their own dreams. We’re going to create jobs in Pennsylvania and across America, especially in places that have been left out and left behind. And that means from our inner cities, to our small towns, to Indian country, to coal country, from communities ravaged by addiction like too many in this county.

I believe with all my heart that the economy should work for everyone, not just those at the top. Leo knows because when I was privileged to work with him. To stand up for steelworkers. To start the very first Manufacturing Caucus in the United States Senate. I had no idea then that I was going to run for president. What I cared about is that I had lots of great people in New York who saw their jobs leave.

Who lost them to automation and technology. Who were the victims of efforts to bust unions and undercut fair wages and benefits. So what I wanted to do was to make it clear that in America, we’re going to keep making things. Anyone willing to work hard should be able to find a job that pays well enough to support a family. That’s the basic bargain of America.

So, here’s how we’re going to do it. Within the first 100 days of our administration, we are going to break the gridlock in Washington and make the biggest investment in new, good paying jobs since World War II. We will start by making the boldest investment in America infrastructure since we built the Interstate Highway System back in the 1950s.

Now, Donald Trump may think we never win anymore and our country is full of losers, but, boy, is he wrong. We still do big things and we can do more big things. We’re not going to build a giant wall, we’re going to build roads and bridges and tunnels and forts and airports and water systems and a new electric […].

And we’re going to connect up all of America to high-speed internet connectivity. You know, yesterday night in Harrisburg we had a great rally at the Broad Street Market, if any of you know that. We were outdoors. It was a beautiful night. And I said, you know, I’m not just talking traditional infrastructure. I’m talking about broadband, virtual infrastructure. Electricity.

And I made a point that some teachers told me. There’s been a recent survey. 70 percent of teachers said that they assign homework that requires the student to go on the internet. Well, you know, that makes sense if you’re going to live in an information age you want your kids to be prepared and smart and savvy about how to use the internet.

But here’s the kicker – 5 million don’t have access at home to high-speed internet. And then I was talking to some of the people who were there after the rally and they said boy, were you right. We have places in Pennsylvania where it’s still dial up.

I mean, how are we supposed to be competitive in the rest of the world if we have smart, hardworking people – their businesses, their kids – their essentially shut out of being able to access information quickly and use that information. So, we’re talking broadly here. And I’m going to do everything we can to create a national infrastructure bank so that we are going to have investments made every year, not just when Congress decides to appropriate money for that.

The second thing we’re going to do is invest in American manufacturing. Anybody who thinks we can’t make it in America ought to come to Pennsylvania and do a tour as I have. Now, the products that you’re making here in the Commonwealth are being sold all over the world, including products made right here. Ron and Jim were telling me about a big order you had from Bangladesh. You know, we can export. Donald Trump, you hear him, he talks a big game about putting America first.

Well, with all due respect, please explain to me what part of America first leads Trump to make Trump dress shirts in Bangladesh, not Ashland, Pennsylvania. Or to make Trump furniture in Turkey, not Freeburg, Pennsylvania. Or Trump picture frames in India, not Bristol, Pennsylvania. In fact, my husband told me on the bus ride here that I was telling him that I just find it maddening that Trump goes around saying this and all the stuff he makes, he makes in other countries. And Bill says, well you know the shirt that he has one right now, he said that’s made in Reading, Pennsylvania.

And, look, you’re not going to believe this because it’s going to sound too coincidental – it’s made at a company called Bills.

Well, so Donald Trump says he wants to make America great again. Well, he could start by actually making things in America again. Now, if we’re serious about investing in America manufacturing, we have to be serious about defending American workers, and that means we’ve got to defend the right to organize and bargain collectively, which helped to build the American middle class in the first place.

That’s why I love coming to plants like this that work business and labor together. But, that’s not Donald Trump. He actually hires union busting firms to break up organizing campaigns. He did that at the hotel in Las Vegas. And then he says he wants to do to America what he’s done to his businesses. We can’t let that happen. We’re going to fight back against attacks on working families, against assaults on the right to organize and bargain collectively. Right to work is wrong for workers and it’s wrong for America.

And we’re going to say no to unfair trade deals. We’re going to stand up to China. We’re going to support our steelworkers, our autoworkers, our homegrown manufacturers. I feel strongly about this, and I need your help. I need your ideas about how we’re going to do this because I’m sick and tired of us having an open market where everybody gets to sell to us, and they often do it at lower costs, undercutting our workers, our businesses, that’s not fair and it’s not right. Now we’ve won a few cases, haven’t we Leo, in the International Trade Commission?

But we’re going to go after that much more aggressively. I will be the first President who has what I’m calling a trade prosecutor to prosecute cases that are undercutting and hurting American manufacturers. Third, we’re going to make America the clean energy superpower of the 21st century because there are millions of new jobs and businesses in that. Pennsylvania is doing some good work.

We owe to future generations to work together to combat climate change, not dismiss it as a Chinese hoax the way Donald Trump has. I love this – he dismisses it as a Chinese hoax when he’s standing on a stage running for president and then he goes and asks for help because he’s worried about some of his golf courses that are maybe going to be hurt by climate change.

I mean that is just hard to believe but we’ve got to take it for what it is. There is no other Donald Trump; you’ve got to look at it from both sides here. So we’re going to set bold goals. We’re going to install a half a billion solar panels and generate enough clean energy to power every home in America within 10 years.

And we are going to create more good-paying jobs, clean energy jobs like the ones that are being created here in Pennsylvania. Fourth, we’re going to support small businesses like the one that my Dad and Tim’s Dad ran, put their hearts and souls into them when we were growing up.

And it’s important for you to know this. Just as Tim told you, we don’t make this up. We actually try to tell you what is factually accurate. We go to a lot of trouble so we can tell you what is actually happening, not just pull it from the air. Just a few hours away in Atlantic City, you’re going to find a lot of hard-working contractors, small businesses, workers, painters, plumbers who lost everything because Donald Trump refused to pay his bills.

We’ve been meeting some of these people – painters, landscapers, plumbers, glass-installers, marble-installers – people who did the work and deserve to be paid and didn’t get it, not because he couldn’t pay them but because he wouldn’t pay them. That’s just not the way it works in America, Donald.

In America we make good on our promises and when somebody puts in the work you are supposed to pay them. You can’t go around bullying small businesses like the one Tim’s Dad ran or my father – if my father had done all that work to print those drapery fabrics and most of his customers were hotels and businesses, and he used to load them into a van and deliver them and then put them up – after all that work, Donald Trump had said, “We’re not going to pay you,” my father first of all would have been stunned.

And then he would have been furious. But what could he have done? Trump would have said, “Well you don’t like it? Sue me. Otherwise take 30 cents on the dollar.” That is so wrong, it just gets my blood boiling. I think about my Dad, I’m sure Tim thinks about his – small businesspeople who did not deserve to be treated like that and 98 percent of businesses in Pennsylvania are small businesses.

That’s one million small businesses, creating jobs, strengthening communities. When you hurt small businesses, you hurt our economy. It’s time we gave small businesses a boost. Let’s cut the red tape, let’s make it easier to get credit. Way too many dreams die in the parking lots of banks these days and we’re going to change that too.

In America, if you can dream it, you should be able to build it. And I will tell you how we’re going to pay for everything that I’ve just proposed. That’s not complicated, either. Wall Street, corporations, and the super rich are going to start paying their fair share of taxes.

Now let me be absolutely clear here, we don’t resent success in America. But when more than 90 percent of the gains in income have gone to the top one percent, that’s where the money is. Remember that old movie? Follow the money! Well, that’s what we’re going to do. American corporations that have gotten so much from our country should be just as patriotic in return.

Many of them are. Johnstown Wire Technologies is, but too many aren’t. So under our plan, if companies try to move headquarters to another country to avoid paying their taxes, we will make them pay an exit tax. It’s wrong to take tax breaks with one hand and give out pink slips with the other. So we’re going to take back all the money that counties and cities and our governments have given to companies. We’ll make them pay it back. And we’ll put that money to work right here, creating good jobs.

The basic principle is simple. America thrives when the middle class thrives, and I will not rest until we get wages and incomes rising for all Americans, not just those at the top. Just yesterday, an economist who advised John McCain, the Republican candidate for President in 2008, just put out a new analysis. He analyzed what Trump has said. He analyzed what I’ve proposed. He said my plans would create millions more jobs than Trump’s. In fact, under my plans, the economy would create at least 10 million jobs in our first term.

As for Donald Trump? Well, his policies were found that they would actually cost us nearly three and a half million jobs. So what’s the difference between Donald Trump’s plan and my plan in terms of jobs created? The combined workforce of Pennsylvania and Ohio. In fact, the more you listen to Donald Trump, the more you realize he is not offering real change. He’s offering empty processes, and what little we know about his economic policies, from running up our debt, to starting trade wars, to letting Wall Street run wild, could devastate working families.

So here we are, my friends. Now I know we’ve got to fight for every single vote. And I’m ready to do that. That’s why we’re on this bus tour, that’s why Tim and I and Bill and Anne and our campaigns are going to cover the country. Because we want you to know the differences. We want you to understand what we’re proposing and why we think it will work, and to contrast that with what Trump is saying.

Now when I say things like this, like his plans would cost 3.5 million jobs, although I’m just quoting an economist, he lashes out. He loses his cool at the slightest provocation. Just yesterday, he went after retired general John Allen, who commanded our troops in Afghanistan. General Allen is a distinguished Marine, a hero and a patriot. Donald Trump called him a “failed general.” Why? Because he does not believe Donald Trump should be Commander in Chief.

Well I’d say that proves it. Our Commander in Chief shouldn’t insult and deride our generals, retired or otherwise. That really should go without saying, but I’m going to respond on behalf of General Allen to those kinds of insults. So, look, I know people are angry and frustrated. I think we just heard one. I understand that. I’m not going into this with some kind of rose-colored glasses. I know we’ve got work to do, but I’ll tell you this, when you’re President, and I know it, because I had a front row seat. I watched my husband as he struggled, and after eight years, we had 23 million new jobs, my friends. Incomes went up for everybody.

And then, unfortunately, the Republicans came back. They slashed taxes on the wealthy, I voted against that. I spoke against that. Then they took their eyes off of the financial markets and the mortgage markets and you know what happened. And then we elected another Democratic president, who inherited another mess from the Republicans. It’s our choice, America. We can grow together, we can have plans that will enable us to create more jobs, give more people a chance to live up to their own dreams.

Or we can go with demagoguery. We can go with insults. We can go with no plans and insofar as they are even understandable, that would cost us jobs. That’s the choice. And boy, is it a historic choice for America. I’m going to do everything I can in this campaign to make the case about what we can do, being stronger together. And I’m not going to respond to what Trump says about me, I don’t really care.

I’ve grown a pretty thick skin. But I’m going to respond when he insults Americans, when he insults workers, when he insults unions, when he insults people who work hard for a living every single day. So let’s go out, let’s make our case, let’s win the election! Thank you and God bless you!”

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Hillary appeared with Senators Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken yesterday in Minneapolis.

At AFT Convention, Clinton Pledges to Work with Educators to Strengthen America’s Public Schools

At the AFT Convention in Minneapolis on Monday, Hillary Clinton reiterated her commitment to ensure every child receives a world-class education, regardless of their ZIP code. Clinton pledged to partner with teachers in the White House to repair our crumbling schools, invest in training and support for our educators, and provide every student in America the opportunity to learn computer science.

Clinton argued that Donald Trump is unfit to serve as president. Trump wants to “largely” eliminate the Department of Education, believes we invest too much in public education, and selected a running mate who slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students. As Clinton said, “Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello!  Hello, AFT!  My goodness, I was listening in the back and I heard Randi at the end of her remarks say, ‘And I’ve known her for 25 years.’ Wow, it’s been fun, hasn’t it?  Gone by fast.

Well, I’m thrilled to be here, and it is only fitting that AFT is celebrating your centennial right here in Minnesota, a state with a proud tradition of public service and great public education.I am thrilled that former Vice President Walter Mondale is here with us. He was one of my earliest inspirations, and I am always grateful for his life of service.  And I also want to say a word about Governor Wendell Anderson.  My thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends, and the countless people whose lives he touched.  Minnesota has a great tradition of electing terrific public servants. And I am so proud to be here with this state’s dynamic duo.  You got a preview, a taste of the combination that Amy and Al represent, but I can tell you that the two senators from Minnesota are among the greatest that Minnesota has ever sent to Washington, and among the greatest to have ever served in the United States Senate. And I just said exactly what they told me to say.  I’ve known Al a long time.  He handed me this slip of paper on the way in.  But no, I consider them both great friends and I am so excited about being able to work with them again starting next January 2017.And Randi, thank you for that introduction, but much more than that, thanks for standing up to injustice in all of its forms.  As Randi said earlier, these have been difficult days for our country and the world.  Just over a week ago, Philando Castile died in a police incident outside St. Paul.”\

AUDIENCE MEMBERS:  “Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.”

HILLARY CLINTON:  “And I just had the great honor – the great honor and the great privilege of meeting with his mother and meeting with two of his uncles and his sister.  And I had heard a lot about Phil, because that is what they call him.  And I share – I share the urgency and the commitment to actually address these issues.

But let me tell you, my friends, let me tell you, we cannot let this madness continue. A lot of people are still in pain right here, including his courageous family, his coworkers and students at the St. Paul public schools.  And to our AFT brothers and sisters in the Twin Cities who knew him as a fellow educator who cared deeply about this community and its children, his mother was telling me how he never wanted to miss a day of work.  He drove 30 miles from their home in Minneapolis to the school where he worked.  Nothing could stop him from being there.  And his death, his loss is ours as well.  Our country has been confronted – our country has been confronted with tragedy too many times recently, hasn’t it?  From St. Paul to Orlando, from Dallas to Baton Rouge, where we saw three police officers murdered yesterday in an apparent ambush.  This hate, this violence cannot stand.  Killing police officers is a crime against us all.  There can be no justification, no looking the other way, and this must end.  And it can. It can be true both that we need law enforcement and that we need to improve law enforcement to get back – to get back to the fundamental principle that everyone in every community benefits when there is respect for the law and everyone is respected by the law.

The service and sacrifice of your fellow public employees is crucial to keeping our communities safe, and these murders threaten the painful, essential work we have to do as a nation.  And for many of the people in this room, that work includes explaining these incidents to our children.  Something you’ve had to do more and more this past year.  So to every single AFT member, I say thank you.

Thank you for caring for all of our children no matter what they look like, where they come from, or who they are.

And thank you for being one of the essential partners in everything we’ve got to do to move our country in the right direction.  Thank you for fighting to reform our broken campaign finance system.  I will stand with you and propose a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. Thank you.  Thank you for fighting to defend and improve the Affordable Care Act – and I will work with you to keep pushing for universal health care coverage. Most of all, thank you for a century of fighting for fairness and opportunity – the teachers, paraprofessionals, school-related personnel, the nurses, and public service employees of AFT.

I know that you have some of the hardest, most important jobs in the world.  And I want to say right from the outset that I’m with you. When I am president, you will have a partner in the White House and you will always have a seat at the table. Because just like you, I get up every day and I ask, how can we do better for America’s kids?  I am committed to making sure every child in this country receives a world-class education with good schools and good teachers, no matter what ZIP code they live in. And I know that starts with supporting parents to be their child’s first teachers. And expanding access to high-quality childcare and universal preschool for every single child.

I know that means repairing our crumbling schools and investing in training and support for our educators, because when we invest in education, we invest in our country’s future.  And you know what?  We also then invest in a stronger economy.  Some of you may know that these issues aren’t new to me.  My first job out of law school was working for the Children’s Defense Fund.  I went door to door in New Bedford, Massachusetts, talking with families whose kids had disabilities that made it hard or impossible for them to go to school.  Our work helped convince Congress to guarantee access to education for all students.  And years later, when my husband was governor of Arkansas, he put me in charge of working to improve our schools, and we held hearings in every county and we came up with a plan, then we fought hard to raise standards and get schools more resources and to get teachers the raises they deserved, which was the highest increase of any state in the country at that time.

So, you see, along with my personal experience, I carry these lessons.  If we work together, we can give schools and educators the resources you need to succeed.  My plan to strengthen public education comes down to TLC: teaching, learning, and community.  America is asking more of our educators than ever before.  Some of you heard the impassioned plea from the police chief in Dallas when he said our society is asking so much more of our police to deal with so many problems.  Well, it’s true of our teachers and our educators as well.

We look to you to fill in gaps that we, as a country, have neglected, like helping low-income kids, English-language learners, kids with disabilities thrive.  And we ask you to help right wrongs, from poverty and homelessness to the legacy of racial inequities stretching back centuries.  We ask so much of you and we don’t give you enough in return. As president, I will launch a national campaign to modernize and elevate the profession of teaching.  I want all educators, at every stage of your careers, to know you’ll be able to keep learning, improving and innovating.  And we also need to be serious about raising wages for teachers and support staff.  Anyone who works full-time in America should be able to earn a living wage without taking second and third jobs just to get by.

And the last thing a teacher needs when you’re just starting out is a mountain of student debt.  When I’m president, future students won’t have to borrow a dime to attend public colleges or universities.  For families making less than $125,000 a year, we will eliminate tuition at public colleges and universities altogether. And for the millions who already have student debt, you will be able to refinance your student loans so you never have to pay more than you can afford.  And if you go into public service, which includes teaching, any remaining debt will be forgiven after 10 years.

Now, we need to make college more affordable, but we can’t cut costs at the expense of talented, committed educators at colleges across the country, including adjunct faculty members.  (Cheers and applause.)  They also deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, and to have a strong voice with a union. If we are serious about supporting educators, we need to support unions.  And I will fight back against attacks on working families in America, and I will defend your right to organize and bargain collectively, and we will not stand for attempts to privatize public services.

Now, here’s what I know.  I know these things can only be done with you in partnership.  So I’m asking you, asking educators across the country, to work with me; asking you to advise me and to hold me accountable; to keep advocating for your students, your profession, and your communities.  Because together, we are stronger, and we can produce results if we get up every single day, make up our minds we’re going to keep working to achieve the goals that I have set out.

The second piece of TLC is learning.  We need to educate our children for the future, not the past.  We want our children to be creators, innovators, entrepreneurs, critical thinkers who can collaborate and communicate within their communities and around the world.  That means we need to be reaching together for new heights, not rehashing old arguments.  It’s time to stop focusing only on, quote, ‘failing schools.’  Let’s focus on all of our great schools too.  When schools get it right, let’s replicate their practices across America. There’s a lot we can learn from each other, and I intend to make sure that we have the best research, the best evidence, no matter where it comes from – that you then can put to work on behalf of your students.

So yes, we are going to do everything possible to work with schools across America.  I’ve been in a lot of those schools.  I used to have what I called the Chelsea test. Now I’ve got the Charlotte test. And that test is pretty simple.  Would I want my daughter, and now my granddaughter, and soon my grandson, to go to school here? I’ll tell you what.  I have walked into a lot of schools where I said, boy, would I be happy – would I be happy to have the most important child in the world to me attend here.  But I’ve also walked into schools where literally the building is falling down, where you can see the holes in the ceiling, where you can see the mold, where you walk into a library and there’s not a single book and there certainly is not a computer.  We can’t tolerate that.  We can’t let any one of America’s precious children – I don’t care who they are – attend a school that shows we don’t care about them.

And that’s why we are not going to go in the direction of letting people on the outside foist for-profit schools on our kids.  We are going to continue to oppose vouchers that drain resources from public schools and undermine their ability to provide the education our children deserve. Where there are public charter schools, we will learn from them.  But what we’re interested in is making sure that every child in our country has the chance to attend a great public school. And I believe part of that rests on working together to find the right balance on testing.

Now, look, you know; you’re the experts.  Tests can provide critical information to teachers and parents to find out how kids are doing, how schools are doing to help them improve.  But when you are forced to teach to a test, our children miss out on some of the most valuable experiences they can gain in a classroom during their school years. I personally have no time for these so-called education wars.  It’s time for those of us who believe in public education to sit at one table, around it together, and listen to you – the teachers and support paraprofessionals who actually are with our kids all day long.

And let’s start making decisions about what’s best for our kids not in accordance with some entrenched ideology.  Consider this:  Right now, there are more than half a million open jobs that require computing skills across the country, in every major industry.  But you know the majority of our schools don’t offer computer science.  That’s partly because there’s a shortage of computer science teachers, it’s partly because our educators don’t have the time or resources to learn how to integrate digital tools into their curriculum.  And we can do something about that.  And on top of it, more than 70 percent of teachers assign homework that requires broadband access, but more than 5 million children don’t have it.  We’re just taking this digital divide and making it a huge problem in the lives of 5 million kids.  And we can do something about that.

As president, I will be your partner to take on these challenges.  We’re going to make sure every child in America has the opportunity to learn computer science.  We’re going to work to close the homework gap by making every student has broadband access that they can use to do their homework. So let’s use all the tools at our disposal, including technology, to give kids an education that will meet the skills needed for the jobs we’re producing.

And finally, there’s C in TLC, community.  So much of what happens inside your classroom is determined by what happens outside.  Too many of our public school students are living in poverty.  For the first time ever, it’s a majority.  51 percent.  That’s on all of us.  But you see students coming to school hungry or exhausted from a long night in a shelter.  So many kids have the weight of the world on their little shoulders.  And we need to tackle all the problems holding our kids back.  And we need to do it together.

I’ve had so many meetings and conversations with teachers, it just breaks my heart, as they tell me about kids who come to school in the dead of winter, no coat on their back.  Come to school unable to even look in their teacher’s face because of what just happened at home or on the way to school.  Go home from school dodging gangs trying to recruit them.  That’s a stain on all of us.  Let’s create more community schools.  More partnerships between schools, social services, and nonprofit organizations.  Let’s pledge that we’re going to give children who need it the mental health services that they deserve.

And you should not have to be from a wealthy family to join a soccer team or have access to extracurricular activities that can develop your confidence and your feeling that you are an important person in the world in the eyes of those who are looking at you.  So we’re going to have to work together.  There is no choice.  From the community level all the way to the White House.  That’s just one of the many reasons why this election is it so important.  I’ll tell you what.  If I weren’t running against him, I would ask Randy to invite me here so I could rail against him.

Because it’s no surprise, my friends, that Donald Trump has a very different take on all of this.  He has said that America spends too much on education.  This is coming from someone who wants to give millionaires a free trillion dollar tax cut over the next decade. At least.  I’d like to hear him explain that to parents in Detroit, where students are trying to learn in crumbling, rodent infested classrooms.  He wants to, and I quote, ‘largely eliminate the Department of Education.’  But he says maybe he’ll leave some tentacles out there, whatever that means.

Now look, that agency may not always get it right, but it provides support for vital programs, from pre-K to Pell grants, and crucial resources to help low income students, students with disabilities, and English-language learners.  So Donald Trump would leave our most vulnerable students to fend for themselves.  If you want to know what kind of president Donald Trump will be, just look at who he’s chosen as his running mate. A Tea Party politician who has worked to undermine the rights of women, workers, LGBT Americans, and immigrants.

Mike Pence is one of the most extreme vice presidential picks in a generation.  And he’s one of the most hostile politicians in America when it comes to public education.  As governor of Indiana, he cut millions from higher education while he was giving huge tax cuts to corporations.  He turned away millions of federal dollars that could have expanded access to preschool for low income children, and slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students.  Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education.

And one more thing.  Parents and educators across America are already worried about what they’re calling the Trump effect, with bullying and harassment on the rise in our schools.  Last week, a mother in Wisconsin wrote me a letter saying that her adopted son had turned to her and said, if Trump becomes president, he’s going to make me go back to Ethiopia.  That’s the kind of fear Donald Trump is creating in the heart of a 10 year old boy.  What do our children think when he calls women pigs, or mocks a reporter with a disability?  Or when he talks about banning one and a half billion Muslims from entering our country?  What do our kids take away from his racist attack against a federal judge, or when he encourages his supporters to punch protesters in the face?  You wouldn’t tolerate that kind of behavior in your home or in your classroom.  How can we stand for it from someone running to be president of the United States?

Well, we know America’s a bighearted, fair-minded country, and that with your help, we’re going to continue to stress to our kids this is one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.  Not just for people who look a certain way, or worship a certain way.  We’re stronger when every child has the chance to live up to his or her full potential.  And public education gives our kids that chance.  So that’s why I’m counting on you. I’m counting on the AFT.  I’m counting on the American public to make sure as many people as possible get registered to vote, get educated, and get mobilized.

Today I announced a nationwide effort by my campaign to get more than 3 million Americans to register and commit to vote in November.  We would love your help. Please go to Hillaryclinton.com/vote to get involved.  And then let’s keep going.  Let’s keep making our case, working for better schools, more resources, more support, to give all of our kids the chance that they deserve.  With your help, we’re going to make sure we get to work on that agenda together, because we’re going to make sure we don’t turn our country over to Donald Trump.  Let’s go win in November.  Thank you all very, very much.”

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Hillary Clinton returned to the Old Statehouse in Springfield, Illinois today to address divisions in America and how to bridge them. It is her second campaign event in the historic hall where Lincoln delivered his “house divided” speech.  In March, Chris Matthews moderated her town hall in that historic location.

 

In Springfield, Hillary Clinton Aims to Bridge Divides in America

Clinton Argued that Trump Is Transforming the Party of Lincoln into the Party of Trump

During a speech at the Old State House in Springfield, Illinois on Wednesday—the site of Abraham Lincoln’s “House Divided” speech—Hillary Clinton addressed the challenges we face as a nation—including on race, economic inequality, and divisiveness.  She also spoke of the need for a president who will bring us together, not tear us apart. From Trump’s ban on Muslims to his promotion of anti-Semitic images pushed by neo-Nazis, Clinton argued that a Trump presidency would be a threat to our democracy and have dangerous repercussions in America and around the globe. Clinton also acknowledged the one-year anniversary of Illinois native Sandra Bland’s passing, reiterating her call for rebuilding trust between law enforcement and communities.

Pointing to the need to unite against Trump’s fear-mongering, Clinton said, “If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire [….] But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all. And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello! Hi. Thank you all very, very much, please be seated, it’s wonderful being back here. It’s always a special privilege having grown up in Chicago in the suburbs to be here in the state capitol and especially here in this great historic place filled with so much meaning, not just for Illinois but for our country. And I’m delighted to have this opportunity to talk with you about the state of our country today.

Nearly 160 years ago, Abraham Lincoln gave a speech in this statehouse that marked a turning point in the political life of our nation.

The question of slavery was being fiercely debated across America. Roughly half the states allowed it. Half abolished it. And some people – including Lincoln – believed that until it was gone entirely, our country would never be truly united and at peace.

So on June 16, 1858, when Mr. Lincoln kicked off his campaign for the United States Senate, he delivered an address on how slavery was tearing our country apart. And that it must go. Some thought that he ended up losing that Senate race because of that speech. But then he won the Presidency. And some thought it was because of that speech.

President Lincoln led America during the most challenging period in our nation’s history. He defended our Union, our Constitution, and the ideal of a nation ‘conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.’ His legacy included laws and amendments that enshrined those values for future generations. They protect and guide us still.

I’m here today, in this place, because the words Lincoln spoke all those years ago still hold resonance for us now.

Remember, he said, ‘A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect,’ he went on, ‘The Union to be dissolved; I do not expect the house to fall. But I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.’

The challenges we face today do not approach those of Lincoln’s time. Not even close. And we should be very clear about that.

But recent events have left people across America asking hard questions about whether we are still a house divided.

Despite our best efforts and highest hopes, America’s long struggle with race is far from finished.  In just the past week, we saw black men killed by police and five police officers killed by a sniper targeting white police. There is too much violence and hate in our country. Too little trust and common ground. It can feel impossible to have the conversations we need to have, to fix what’s broken.

And despite being the richest country on earth, we have too much economic inequality – and that also undermines the foundation of our democracy.

Lincoln understood that threat, too. He deeply believed everyone deserved – in his words – ‘a fair chance in the race of life.’ He saw it as a defining feature of the United States, and believed it was vital that hard-working people be free to enjoy the fruits of their own labor. It’s one of the reasons he was so strongly against slavery – because it violated that entire notion. And as President, he took pains to use the tools of government to create more economic opportunity for Americans at every level of society. So, too, must we fight inequality and create opportunity in our time – not just for some Americans, but for all.

So I come today as a mother and a grandmother to two beautiful little children. Who, I want them and all our children to grow up in a country where violence like the kind we saw last week doesn’t happen again – and where the American Dream is big enough for everyone.

I’m also here as a candidate for President who is deeply concerned about the divisions that still hold our people apart and our nation back. I believe that our future peace and prosperity depends on whether we meet this moment with honesty and courage.

That means taking a hard look at our laws and our attitudes. It means embracing policies that promote justice for all people, and standing firm against any attempt to roll back the clock on the rights and opportunities that so many sacrificed so much to secure.

And all of that starts with doing a better job of listening to each other.

We need to listen to the families whose loved ones have been killed in police incidents. Alton Sterling and Philando Castile are just the latest in a long and painful litany of African Americans dying after encounters with police officers. We remember Laquan McDonald, killed in Chicago a year and a half ago and Sandra Bland, who grew up in Illinois who died one year ago today. Time after time, no one is held accountable. And surely we can all agree that’s deeply wrong and needs to change.

And yes we do need to listen to those who say ‘Black Lives Matter.’ Too many black Americans, especially young men, feel like their lives are disposable. And they worry every single day about what might happen. They have reason to feel that way. And it’s absolutely unacceptable. Everyone in America, everyone deserves to be treated with respect and dignity. Surely that is something we can all unite behind.

We need to acknowledge the five Latinos who also lost their lives in police incidents last week. Their stories didn’t get national media coverage, but their families and communities are mourning too.

And at the same time, we need to listen to the dedicated, principled police officers working hard every day to rebuild trust with the communities they serve and protect. Our men and women in blue put their lives on the line everyday to keep us safe and keep our democracy strong. Remember what Michael Krol, Michael Smith, Lorne Ahrens, Brent Thompson and Patrick Zamarripa were doing when they died. They were protecting a peaceful march. They were people cloaked in authority making sure their fellow citizens could exercise their right to protest authority. And there’s nothing more vital to our democracy than that. And they gave their lives for it.

David Brown, the Dallas police chief, said that when it comes to overcoming systemic racism and so many other problems in society, we ask too much of the police and too little of everyone else. I think he’s absolutely right. This is our problem, and we all need to work together to solve it.

We also need to listen to the families crying out for relief from gun violence. President Obama’s trip to Dallas yesterday was the 11th time he has spoken to a city in mourning after a mass shooting. The wrong people keep getting their hands on guns. And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind that the Dallas killer had, which allowed him to outgun the police. And the vast majority of gun owners agree: we have to come together around common sense steps to prevent gun violence. If we’re looking for common ground – this is common ground. And I hope that we will, from Washington, to Springfield to everywhere across America, come to agreement about that.

Now I understand that just saying these things together may upset some people. I’m talking about police reform just a few days after a horrific attack on police officers. I’m talking about courageous, honorable police officers just a few days after officer-involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota. I’m bringing up guns in a country where just talking about comprehensive background checks and getting assault weapons off our streets gets you demonized.

But all these things can be true at the same time.

We do need criminal justice reform to save lives and to make sure all Americans are treated as equals in rights and dignity. We do need to support our police departments that are trying to get it right, and honor the men and women who protect us every day. We do need to do more to stop gun violence. We may disagree about how to do these things, but surely we can all agree with those basic premises. And I hope and pray the past week has showed us how true they are.

Now, these are the issues on many of our minds right now. And if we stop there, that would leave us with plenty of work to do.

So I wish I could say that was everything that we must address.

But these events are taking place against a much broader backdrop of fear and anxiety. So I think we have to face all of it.

We do need to make sure our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top. The changes that have roiled our economy over the past few decades are not just numbers on a page that economists study. They are real forces that families are dealing with up close and personal every day.

Not long ago, I met with factory workers here in Illinois whose jobs are being sent abroad, and heard how painful the consequences have been for them and their families. I’ve talked to workers across our country who’ve seen good jobs lost to technologies, who keep being told to get more training – even though that often doesn’t lead to a good new job on the other end.

These economic disruptions have stripped too many people of their sense of security and dignity. And that can have devastating consequences. We have to ask ourselves, why are drug addiction and suicide on the rise in parts of our country? That’s not just about economics. It’s about something deeper, that is connected to economics: a sense of dislocation, even a pessimism about whether America still holds anything for them or cares about them at all.

That’s why I’ve pledged that in my first 100 days as President, we will make the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II. We need more jobs you can support a family on, especially in places that have been left out and left behind from Coal Country to Indian Country to inner cities, to every place that’s been hollowed out when a factory closed or a mine shut down because everyone in America deserves that ‘fair chance in the race of life’ that President Lincoln described.

Now, I realize that our politics have contributed to the sense of division many Americans feel right now. And as someone in the middle of a hotly fought political campaign, I cannot stand here and claim that my words and actions haven’t sometimes fueled the partisanship that often stands in the way of progress. So I recognize I have to do better too.

I’m running for President with the belief that we need to face up to these challenges and fix them in order to become a stronger, fairer country. And in times like these, we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.

And that is why I believe Donald Trump is so dangerous.

His campaign is as divisive as any we have seen in our lifetimes. It is built on stoking mistrust and pitting American against American. It’s there in everything he says and everything he promises to do as President.

It’s there in how he wants to ban Muslims from coming to the United States, and toyed with creating a database to track Muslims in America. It’s there in the way he demeans women, in his promotion of an anti-Semitic image pushed by neo-Nazis, and in the months that he spent trying to discredit the citizenship and legitimacy of our first black President. Last night in an interview, he said that he understands systemic bias against black people because – and I quote – ‘even against me, the system is rigged’ – unquote. He went on to say, ‘I can relate to it very much myself.’  Even this – the killing of people – is somehow all about him.

It’s there in his proposals on immigration. He says he’ll round up 11 million people and kick them out. He’s actually described a special deportation force that would go around America, pulling people out of their homes and workplaces, pulling children out of school. I got a letter from a mother the other day who said her adopted son asked her with a shaky voice if President Trump would send him back to Ethiopia. When kids are scared by political candidates and policy debates, it’s a sign something has gone badly wrong.

And we see it in the violence that Donald Trump encouraged toward protesters at his rallies, and the strange things he has said about the violence that will occur if we don’t elect him. He says that if he doesn’t win this November, we – and again I quote – ‘won’t even have a country anymore,’ America’s ‘not going to continue to survive.’  I do not know what he’s talking about. But I do know we don’t need that kind of fear-mongering – not now, not ever.

And he’s gone even further even than that. He has taken aim at some of our most cherished democratic values and institutions. He wants to revoke the citizenship of 4 million Americans born in this country to immigrant parents, and eliminate the bedrock principle enshrined in the 14th Amendment – that if you’re born in America, you’re a citizen of America. He said that a distinguished American, born in Indiana, a judge can’t be trusted to do his job because his parents were Mexican; he called him a ‘Mexican judge’ over and over again. He knew that the judge had been born in Indiana. But it was a cynical, calculated attempt to fan the flames of racial division. And designed to undermine people’s faith in our judicial system. Why would someone running for President want to do that?

And even that’s not all. He says, as Commander-in-Chief, he would order our troops to commit war crimes, and insisted they would follow his orders, even though that goes against decades of military training and the military code. He’s banished members of the press who have criticized him – is there any doubt he would do the same as President? Imagine if he had not just Twitter and cable news to go after his critics and opponents, but also the IRS – or for that matter, our entire military. Given what we have seen and heard, do any of us think he’d be restrained?

And he has shown contempt for and ignorance of our Constitution. Last week, he met with House Republicans in Washington to try to assuage their serious concerns about him. One member asked whether he’d protect Article I, which defines the separation of powers between Congress and the executive branch. Here’s the answer he reportedly gave: ‘I want to protect Article One, Article Two, Article Twelve.’ Well here’s the thing – there is no Article Twelve – not even close. That was a serious question, from an elected representative, and he either didn’t care enough to answer it seriously – or he didn’t know where to begin.

Even the most stalwart Republicans were alarmed by that. And well they, and we, should be.

The first thing a new President does is take an oath to ‘protect and defend’ the Constitution. To do that with any meaning, you’ve got to know what’s in it. And you’ve got to respect what’s in it.

I do wish Donald Trump would listen to other people once in awhile. He might actually learn something. But he’s made it clear – that’s not his thing. As he has said, he only listens to himself.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln. We are watching it become the Party of Trump. And that’s not just a huge loss for our democracy – it is a threat to it.

Because Donald Trump’s campaign adds up to an ugly, dangerous message to America. A message that you should be afraid – afraid of people whose ethnicity is different, or religious faith is different, or who were born in a different country or hold different political beliefs.

Make no mistake – there are things to fear in this world, and we need to be clear-eyed about them. But we are each other’s countrymen and women. We share this miraculous country. This land and its heritage is yours, mine and everyone’s – willing to pledge allegiance and understand the solemn responsibilities of American citizenship. That’s what ‘indivisible’ means – that big word that every grade school student knows – that we’re in this together, even if that’s not always easy.

So let’s think better of each other. Let’s hold together in the face of our challenges – not turn on each other or tear each other down.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to a dangerous job we need them to do.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of African Americans and Latinos, and try as best we can to imagine what it would be like if we had to have ‘the talk’ with our kids about how carefully they need to act because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or killed.

And yes, let’s put ourselves in the shoes of Donald Trump’s supporters. We may disagree on the causes and the solutions to the challenges we face – but I believe like anyone else, they’re trying to figure out their place in a fast-changing America. They want to know how to make a good living and how to give their kids better futures and opportunities. That’s why we’ve got to reclaim the promise of America for all our people – no matter who they vote for.

And let’s be more than allies to each other. Let’s take on each other’s struggles as our own.

My life’s work is built on the conviction that we are stronger together. Not separated into factions or sides. Not shouting over each other, but together. Our economy is stronger when everyone contributes to it, and everyone can benefit from the work they do. Our communities are stronger when we all pull together to solve our problems and restore our faith in each other, and by doing so in the promise of America. Our country is stronger when we work with our friends and allies to promote peace, prosperity, and security around the world.

This is an idea that goes back to the founding of America, when 13 separate colonies found a way – despite their differences – to join together as one nation. They knew they were not stronger on their own, and neither are we.

I’ve had the great delight of seeing the musical “Hamilton.” And I hope more people at least get a chance to listen to the score and to hear the words. There’s a great song by the character playing George Washington who sings, ‘History’s eyes are on us.’ That was true then, and that’s true today.

If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire. Now don’t get me wrong, fierce debates are part of who we are – they started at my dinner table with my father, and have continued ever since. It is who we are. You’re reminded of that when you read history, when you think about the Lincoln-Douglas Debates. Debate over the right way forward.

And sometimes we have to balance competing values like freedom and order, justice and security, these are complementary values of American life. That isn’t easy. Previous generations have had to overcome terrible challenges. And no one more so than Abraham Lincoln. But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.

Thank you all very much.”

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Capping off a week that began with celebratory fireworks and ended in a barrage of bullets aimed at police officers in Dallas, Hillary Clinton spoke to Wolf Blitzer and Lester Holt today about the need to overhaul relationships between police and the communities they serve. Demonstrations nationwide in the wake of the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile at the hands of police were peaceful, perhaps none more so than the one in Dallas where the police actually collaborated with the Black Lives Matter movement in mapping out a parade route and then protected the marchers on that route.

 


Speaking from Philadelphia where she was scheduled to visit an A.M.E. Church congregation, Hillary reiterated the need for nationwide criminal justice reform.

Here is her plan.

Our criminal justice system is out of balance.

Hillary will:

  • End the era of mass incarceration, reform mandatory minimum sentences, and end private prisons.
  • Encourage the use of smart strategies—like police body cameras—and end racial profiling to rebuild trust between law enforcement and communities.
  • Help formerly incarcerated individuals successfully re-enter society.

“I will never stop working on issues of equality and opportunity, race, and justice. That is a promise. I’ve done it my entire adult life. I will always be in your corner.”

Hillary, JULY 31, 2015

Hillary believes our criminal justice system is out of balance. In her first major speech of the campaign, she said we have to come to terms with some hard truths about race and justice in America and called for an end to the “era of mass incarceration.”

Read more: 9 things you should know about Hillary Clinton’s plan to reform our criminal justice system

Although the United States has less than 5 percent of the world’s population, we have almost 25 percent of the total prison population. A significant percentage of the more than 2 million Americans incarcerated today are nonviolent offenders. African American men are far more likely to be stopped and searched by police, charged with crimes, and sentenced to longer prison terms than white men found guilty of the same offenses.

“Black lives matter. Everyone in this country should stand firmly behind that. … Since this campaign started, I’ve been talking about the work we must do to address the systemic inequities that persist in education, in economic opportunity, in our justice system. But we have to do more than talk—we have to take action.”

Hillary, JULY 20, 2015

Read more: Sybrina Fulton shares why she’s supporting Hillary

Hillary believes that, to successfully reform our criminal justice system, we must work to strengthen the bonds of trust between our communities and our police, end the era of mass incarceration, and ensure a successful transition of individuals from prison to home. As president, she will:

  • Work to strengthen bonds of trust between communities and police. Effective policing and constitutional policing go hand-in-hand—we can and must do both. Hillary will work to promote effective, accountable, constitutional policing, including:
    • Making new investments to support state-of-the-art law enforcement training programs at every level on issues such as implicit bias, use of force, de-escalation, community policing and problem solving, alternatives to incarceration, crisis intervention, and officer safety and wellness.
    • Strengthening the U.S. Department of Justice’s pattern or practice unit by increasing resources, working to secure subpoena power, and improving data collection for pattern or practice investigations.
    • Doubling funding for the U.S. Department of Justice “Collaborative Reform” program to provide technical assistance and training to agencies that undertake voluntary efforts toward transformational reform of their police departments. Across the country, there are police departments deploying creative and effective strategies that we can learn from and build on.
    • Supporting legislation to end racial profiling by federal, state, and local law enforcement officials.
    • Providing federal matching funds to make body cameras available to every police officer to increase transparency and accountability on both sides of the lens.
    • Promoting oversight and accountability in use of controlled equipment by limiting the transfer of military equipment by the federal government to local law enforcement, eliminating the one-year use requirement, and requiring transparency by agencies that purchase equipment using federal funds.
    • Collecting and reporting national data on policing to inform policing strategies and provide greater transparency and accountability, including robust state and local data on issues such as crime, officer involved shootings, and deaths in custody.
    • Creating national guidelines for use of force that recognize the need for officers to protect their safety and the safety of others, but emphasize use of force as a last resort and at the appropriate level. The federal government has an important role to play in standardizing best practices for the use of force.
  • Take action on mandatory minimum sentences. Excessive federal mandatory minimum sentences keep nonviolent drug offenders in prison for longer than is necessary or useful and have increased racial inequality in our criminal justice system. Hillary will reform mandatory minimum sentences, including:
    • Reducing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenses by cutting them in half.
    • Applying Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 retroactively to allow current nonviolent prisoners to seek fairer sentences.
    • Eliminating the sentencing disparity for crack and powder cocaine so that equal amounts of crack and powder cocaine carry equal sentences and applying this change retroactively.
    • Reforming the “strike” system to focus on violent crime by narrowing the category of prior offenses that count as strikes to exclude nonviolent drug offenses, and reducing the mandatory penalty for second- and third-strike offenses.
    • Granting additional discretion to judges in applying mandatory minimum sentences by expanding the “safety valve” to a larger set of cases.
  • Focus federal enforcement resources on violent crime, not simple marijuana possession. Marijuana arrests, including for simple possession, account for a huge number of drug arrests. Further, significant racial disparities exist in marijuana enforcement, with black men significantly more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than their white counterparts, even though usage rates are similar. Hillary believes we need an approach to marijuana that includes:
    • Allowing states that have enacted marijuana laws to act as laboratories of democracy, as long as they adhere to certain federal priorities such as not selling to minors, preventing intoxicated driving, and keeping organized crime out of the industry.
    • Rescheduling marijuana from a Schedule I to a Schedule II substance. Hillary supports medical marijuana and would reschedule marijuana to advance research into its health benefits.
  • Prioritize treatment and rehabilitation—rather than incarceration—for low-level, nonviolent drug offenders. Over half of prison and jail inmates suffer from a mental health problem, and up to 65 percent of the correctional population meets the medical criteria for a substance use disorder. Hillary will ensure adequate training for law enforcement for crisis intervention and referral to treatment, as appropriate, for low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with mental health or addiction problems. She will also direct the attorney general to issue guidance to federal prosecutors on seeking treatment over incarceration for low-level, nonviolent drug crimes. Read more on Hillary’s plan to tackle America’s epidemic of addiction.
  • End the privatization of prisons. Hillary believes we should move away from contracting out this core responsibility of the federal government to private corporations, and from creating private industry incentives that may contribute—or have the appearance of contributing—to over-incarceration. The campaign does not accept contributions from federally registered lobbyists or PACs for private prison companies, and will donate any such direct contributions to charity.
  • Promote successful re-entry by formerly incarcerated individuals. This year, the number of people released from state or federal prison will reach approximately 600,000. For those given a second chance, and for the health and safety of the communities to which those individuals return, the reentry pathway must not be littered with barriers, but rather paved with a fair opportunity for success. Clinton will work to remove barriers and create pathways to employment, housing, health care, education, and civic participation, including:
    • Taking executive action to “ban the box” for federal employers and contractors, so that applicants have an opportunity to demonstrate their qualifications before being asked about their criminal records.
    • Supporting legislation to restore voting rights to individuals who have served their sentences.

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This is just my opinion: What hurts the most about this week is that in every case people were doing what they were supposed to do. Both Sterling and Castile carried guns but were licensed and at least Castile told the officer that and specified that he was getting his driver’s license,after learning where to send an old driver ID, as directed, when he was shot. He was complying. The police in Dallas from every testimonial were supporting the demonstrators and when the bullets started flying, protected them

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Hillary Clinton’s Commitment: A Debt-Free Future for America’s Graduates

Education is the key to so much we want to achieve as a country:  a stronger, more equitable economy; a healthier, more vibrant democracy; a future in which we meet challenges with ingenuity and skill.  Education is also the key to our young people achieving their dreams.  It’s how we develop our talents and imagine different futures for ourselves.  So any serious plan for America’s future must include a bold plan to put quality education – including college – within everyone’s reach, no matter how much money they have.

College used to be pretty affordable.  For millions of Americans, that’s not the case anymore. Too many families in the United States are struggling with student debt, and the problem has reached crisis levels. Within the last ten years, total student debt in our economy has more than doubled and now exceeds $1.2 trillion. Nearly 7 out of every 10 new graduates of four-year colleges are in debt, and these indebted graduates carry an average balance of nearly $30,000. Student debt has surpassed credit card debt, car loan debt, and home equity lines of credit to be the second largest source of consumer debt.

And this is not just an issue for borrowers: It is holding our economy back. This debt prevents people from forming families, buying homes, and starting small businesses. If you plan on starting a new business then review Sky Blue vs Lexington law breakdown. It sends the wrong signal to future students whom we need to complete college to drive economic growth.

Meanwhile, for families sending their kids to colleges and universities, tuition has ballooned out of control and has become increasingly unaffordable even at public colleges and universities.  Tuition has risen 40% in the last ten years at four-year public colleges and universities, after inflation, while family incomes have remained basically flat.  And states have been cutting their spending on higher education – by roughly 20% per student since the recession – rather than expanding their investments.

Simply put, this situation has careened out of control.  Hillary Clinton has a plan to help millions of Americans with their debt right now, and a plan to make college debt-free for future generations.

Provide Immediate Help to Graduates Who Need Relief from Crushing Debt Hillary has made clear she will fight to ensure that all borrowers can:

  • Refinance their student loans at current rates, just as borrowers can refinance a car or home loan. Refinancing would help 25 million borrowers across the country, with the typical borrower saving $2,000 over the life of the loan.
  • Enroll in income-based repayment. Nobody should have to pay more than 10 percent of monthly income, and college debt should be forgiven after 20 years – and 10 years if a borrower works in the public interest. Hillary will simplify, expand and develop options for automatic enrollment in these programs.
  • Push employers to contribute to student debt relief. Employers must be part of the solution to the student debt crisis. Clinton will create a payroll deduction portal for employers and employees that will simplify the repayment process. She will explore further options to encourage employers to help pay down student debt.
  • Get relief from debt for starting a business or social enterprise.  Aspiring entrepreneurs will be able to defer their loans with no payments or interest for up to three years so that student debt and the lack of family wealth is not a barrier to innovation in our country. For social entrepreneurs and those starting new enterprises in distressed communities, her plan will provide up to $17,500 in loan forgiveness.
  • Reward public service.  AmeriCorps members who complete two years of national service and a year of public service can have their loans forgiven.  Teachers who teach in high-need areas or in subjects with teacher shortages – such as computer science or special education – will get enhanced loan forgiveness.
A Moratorium on Student Debt to Get Millions of Borrowers Relief from Crushing Debt: Today, Hillary Clinton is announcing that she will take immediate executive action to offer a three-month moratorium on student loan payments to all federal loan borrowers. During this time-out from paying student loans, every borrower will be given the resources and targeted help they need to save money on their loans. With dedicated assistance from the Department of Education during this moratorium, borrowers will be able to consolidate their loans, sign up quickly and easily for income-based repayment plans, and take direct advantage of opportunities to reduce monthly interest payments and fees. Borrowers who are delinquent or in default will receive additional rehabilitation options to help them get back on their feet. Clinton will also use the moratorium to crack down on for-profit colleges and loan servicers who have too often taken advantage of borrowers – and to ensure that borrowers can resolve outstanding issues in a timely and fair manner.

Debt-Free College for our Future Students

Hillary Clinton has pledged to achieve the goal of debt-free college for future graduates, so that cost is never a barrier for young people seeking to pursue their dreams of higher education (click here for more details).  It’s a simple, but bold idea:  Every student should be able to graduate from a public college or university in their state without taking on any student debt.  To reach this goal, Hillary is enhancing the New College Compact she announced last year.  Her plan will:

  • Eliminate college tuition for working families. Families with income up to $125,000 will pay no tuition at in-state public colleges and universities – covering more than 80 percent of all families. From the start of this plan, every student from a family making $85,000 a year or less will be able to go to a 4-year public college or university tuition free. This income threshold will increase by $10,000 a year every year over the next four years so that by 2021, all students with a family income of $125,000 will have the opportunity to pay no tuition. She will also continue her commitment to ensure that community colleges are tuition-free for all working families.
  • Help students deal with all of the costs of attending college.  Hillary Clinton will protect Pell Grant funding to help low- and middle-income students pay non-tuition expenses, and she will restore year-round Pell Grant funding so that students have the necessary support they need to take summer classes and meet their goal of completing college.  She will make a major investment in HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions and other low-cost, modest-endowment private schools so that these deserving students also benefit from the lower cost of college. She will work to expand opportunities for students to earn money for expenses through term-time work and to receive college credit for national service. She will expand support for student-parents, including a fifteen-fold increase in federal funding for on-campus child care.

The New College Compact: Hillary Clinton’s plan requires everyone to do their part.  The federal government will make a major new investment to make this possible, but states will have to step up and meet their obligations as well.

States will have to commit to a combination of reinvestment and reform over the next four years and beyond to ensure that federal support is funding students and not excessive cost growth.

  • Colleges and universities will be accountable for reining in costs to provide value to their students; improving completion rates and learning outcomes; and doing more to provide students from disadvantaged backgrounds with the tools they need to reach college and succeed once they get there.
  • Students will be expected to work 10 hours a week to help defray the full cost of attendance. Clinton will push to expand work opportunities that build career skills and introduce students of all backgrounds to public service careers.
  • As part of this New College Compact, Hillary will encourage and reward innovators who design imaginative new ways of providing valuable higher education to students while driving down costs.  And she will crack down on the abusive practices of for-profit colleges that defraud taxpayers while burdening students with debt for educational programs of no value.

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Hillary outlined her plan for the economy in Raleigh following an earlier speech by Donald Trump about her. Hillary’s team was quick to fact check his words and point out the hypocrisy.

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Too many corporations seem to have forgotten: It’s wrong to take taxpayer dollars with one hand and give out pink slips with the other.

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Every American willing to work hard should be able to find a job that pays enough to support a family.

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“The heart of my plan will be the biggest investment in American infrastructure in decades.” —Hillary

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We’re going to invest $20 billion specifically to create jobs for young people, especially in communities of color.

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We should support our teachers, not scapegoat them.

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“I will make it a national priority for more companies to share profits with employees. On top of, not instead of, good wages.” —Hillary

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We’ll make companies that ship jobs overseas give back tax breaks they received here at home.

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“Progress is possible … I know Republicans and Democrats can work together, because I’ve done it.” —Hillary

Instead of pitting people against each other, we need to enlist everyone in building our country together.

Hillary Clinton Delivers Remarks on the Economy in Raleigh

In a forward-looking policy address in Raleigh, North Carolina on Wednesday, Hillary Clinton explained how, as president, she will build an economy that works for everyone—not just those at the top. Clinton outlined five specific goals to realize this vision:

1) Pass the biggest investment in good-paying jobs since World War II in her first 100 days; 2) Make debt-free college education available to all Americans; 3) Let workers share in the profits they help create; 4) Ensure Wall Street and the wealthiest Americans pay their fair share; and 5) Put families first and match our policies to how they actually live and work in the 21st century.

Below is a transcript of Clinton’s remarks today:

“Thank you, It’s great to be back in Raleigh! Thank you so much. I have to confess I was having such a good time backstage listening to the 120 Minutes Band, listening to Mary Wingate do the national anthem and just being absolutely transported by Shay Taylor and Friends, the gospel group that got us all going today. And I cannot thank a better twosome than the people you just saw up here.

Because I honestly believe Jim Hunt is not only one of the best governors North Carolina has ever had, but one of the best governors ever in America in the last years. And what he did to really put North Carolina on a path to the future has stood the test of time. We’ve had a few glitches with others who don’t seem to understand what the ingredients are for building an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. But Jim Hunt knows that.

I look forward to continuing to work with him. And I was so delighted to have a chance, as I did, to have Alicia Wilkerson talk about her journey, how hard she has worked, raising her children, getting an education, making it possible for her to have a better future.

I so greatly appreciate her mentioning the SCHIP program which has helped 8 million kids every year get health insurance. Now because we are in North Carolina and we have a lot of friends here I want to acknowledge some of them. Your Secretary of State Elaine Marshall.

Senator Dan Blue, the Minority Leader of the North Carolina Senate. Representative Larry Hall, the Democratic leader of the North Carolina House of Representatives. Linda Coleman running for Lieutenant Governor. Judge Mike Morgan running against a Republican Supreme Court incumbent. And don’t forget than Dan Blue III is running for State Treasurer. Josh Stein, running for Attorney General. And let’s give a big round of applause to your next governor, Attorney General Roy Cooper! Your next AG commissioner Walter Smith and your next United States Senator, Debra Ross. We’re going to work hard in the this election to elect as many Democrats up and down the ticket so that North Carolina can get back on the path to the path to the future, get off this detour that you’ve been on.

I have to start by saying if you notice anything different about me today, it could be that now I have double the ‘grandmother glow.’ This past weekend, Chelsea and Marc had a little boy and we’re all totally over the moon about it.

Obviously, our family will do everything we can to make sure little Charlotte and now little Aidan grow up with every possible opportunity. I know that’s what every parent and grandparent, aunt or uncle, godmother and godfather, people who care about the children in our lives, that’s exactly how we all feel.

I believe with all my heart that you should not have to be the grandchild of a former President or Secretary of State to have every opportunity available to you in this country.

Every single child deserves the chance to live up to his or her God-given potential and that has been the cause of my life.

It’s rooted in the values I learned from my family and my faith. We’re all in this together. And we have a responsibility to lift each other up.

As we Methodists say: do all the good you can to all the people you can in all the ways you can. And that is absolutely true for our children.

That’s why I got into public service in the first place. And it’s why I’m determined that we will win this election.

I think it’s an understatement to say that Americans face a choice in November.

As I said yesterday in Ohio, Donald Trump offers no real solutions for the economic challenges we face – he just continues to spout reckless ideas that will run up our debt and cause another economic crash.

I’m here today to offer an alternative. I have a clear vision for the economy, and it’s this: We need to make sure our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top.

Not just for the rich or the well-connected, not just for people living in some parts of the country, or people from certain backgrounds and not others – I mean everyone.

I have a plan to get us there: Five steps we can take together to drive growth that’s strong, fair, and lasting. Growth that reduces inequality, increases upward mobility; that reaches into every corner of our country.

The measure of our success will be how much incomes rise for hardworking families. How many children are lifted out of poverty. How many Americans can find good jobs that support a middle class life and not only that, jobs that provide a sense of dignity and pride. That’s what it means to have an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. That’s the mission, and I’m asking all of you to join me in it.

We have to overcome some big challenges. I will admit that,

First, too many of our representatives in Washington are in the grips of a failed economic theory called trickle-down economics. I do not question their sincerity, but it has been proven wrong again and again.

But there are still people in Congress who insist on cutting taxes for the wealthy instead of investing in our future.

They careen from one self-inflicted crisis to another – shutting down the government, threatening to default on our national debt, refusing to make the common-sense investments that used to have broad bipartisan support, like rebuilding our roads and our bridges, our tunnels, our highways and airports, or investing in better education from zero through high school and college.

I like to look at evidence: I plead to that. I think evidence is important when making decisions that affect other people’s lives. If the evidence were there to support this ideology, I would have to acknowledge that, but we have seen the results. Twice now in the past 30 years a Republican president has caused an economic mess and a Democratic president has had to come in and clean it up.

And yes, too many special interests and too many lobbyists have stood in the way of progress while protecting the perks of the privileged few.

It’s not just Washington.

Too many corporations have embraced policies that favor hedge funds and other big shareholders and top management at the expense of their workers, communities, and even their long-term value.

They’re driven by Wall Street’s obsession with short-term share prices and quarterly earnings.

A recent survey of corporate executives found that more than half when asked would hold off on making a successful long-term investment — maybe in their workers, or plant equipment, or research — if it meant missing a target in the next earnings report.

So corporations stash cash overseas or they send it to top shareholders in the form of stock buybacks or dividends, instead of raising wages or investing in research and development.

This pressure, this short term pressure, leads to perverse incentives and outrageous behavior.

It is wrong to take taxpayer dollars with one hand and give out pink slips with the other hand. And no company should be moving their headquarters overseas, just to avoid paying their taxes here at home.

In addition, there have been big changes in how American families live, learn, and work, but our policies haven’t kept up.

There are so many examples of this.

Over the past several decades, women have entered the workforce and boosted our economy, yet we are the only, the only developed country that doesn’t provide paid family leave of any kind.

We’re asking families to rely on an old system of supports in a new economic reality. No wonder so many are struggling.

The bottom line is that too many leaders in business and government have lost sight of our shared responsibility to each other and to our nation.

They let Wall Street take big risks with unregulated financial activities, they skew our tax code toward the wealthy, they failed to enforce our trade rules, they undermined workers’ rights.

They have forgotten that we are all in this together and we are at our best when we recognize that. Excessive inequality such as we have today reduces economic growth. Markets work best when all the stakeholders share in the benefits.

The challenges we face are significant.

It is not easy to change Washington, or how corporations behave. It takes more than stern words or a flashy slogan – it takes a plan.

It takes experience and the ability to work with both parties to get results.

That means we need a President who knows what we’re up against, has no illusions about what we need to do to move ahead, but can actually get it done. And that is what I am offering.

Because there is good news. The good news is that everywhere I go, smart, determined men and women are working hard to reverse these trends.

Mayors are pioneering innovative ways to work with the private sector to invest in their cities.

Entrepreneurs and small businesses are building and hiring in places that bigger companies have abandoned.

Unions are providing training programs that add value to the companies that employ their members.

Union pension funds are already investing in infrastructure projects that have supported more than 100,000 jobs here in our country.

So do not grow weary, there are great ideas out there. And we are going to be partners in a big, bold effort to increase economic growth and distribute it more fairly.

To build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. I believe the federal government should adopt five ambitious goals:

First, let’s break through the dysfunction in Washington to make the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II.

Second, let’s make college debt-free for all. And transform the way we prepare Americans for the jobs of the future.

Third, let’s rewrite the rules so more companies share profits with their

employees, and fewer ship profits and jobs overseas.

Finally, let’s make sure that Wall Street, corporations, and the super-rich pay their fair share of taxes. And all of this depends upon putting our families first and matching our policies to how you actually live and work in the 21st century.

Briefly about these four points: Let’s start with jobs.

Every American willing to work hard should be able to find a job that pays enough to support a family. And I know we can do this because I’ve seen it in the past.

You know, I remember when I was growing up and America had come out from the upheaval of depression and world war. Our leaders worked together to invest in a new foundation for American power and prosperity.

Highways to connect up our entire nation. College and housing for returning veterans and their families. Unprecedented scientific research. And it worked – we built the greatest middle class the world has ever known.

Now, we have to get as ambitious again. There is nothing we can’t do. Let’s be just as ambitious to build our 21st century American economy to produce the same results for hard working Americans.

In my first 100 days as President, I will work with both parties to pass a comprehensive plan to create the next generation of good jobs. Now the heart of my plan will be the biggest investment in American infrastructure in decades, including establishing an infrastructure bank that will bring private sector dollars off the sidelines and put them to work here.

And I’ve talked with local leaders around America and I’ve seen the dire need for investment. In Tampa, for example, I saw how a smart, targeted highway investment near a major port can create thousands of good-paying jobs, support the local economy and unlock national commerce.

We can create millions of good-paying jobs while preparing America to compete and win in the global economy.

So let’s set these big national goals. And I know how important it is to rebuild our roads, our bridges and our airports, but we have more work to do. Let’s build better. And let’s connect every household to broadband by the year 2020.

Let’s build a cleaner, more resilient power grid with enough renewable energy to power every home in the country. Let’s fix failing water systems like the one that poisoned children in Flint, Michigan. Let’s renovate our public schools so every child in every community has access to safe, high-tech classrooms, laboratories, and libraries.

Our 100 Days jobs package will also include transformational investments in key drivers of growth:

Advance manufacturing, so we can ‘make it in America’ and compete and win in the global economy.

Making America the clean energy superpower of the 21st century, which will create millions of jobs and help protect our planet.

Recommitting to scientific research, which can create new whole industries, just like we did in the 90’s when we started mapping the human genome.

And small businesses, which should be the engine for creating new jobs across America, they need to be free of red tape and they need to have access to credit. We need to slash unnecessary regulations making it easier to get startup capital from community banks and credit unions. If you have an idea for a small business, we want you to get started.

Let’s free entrepreneurs to do what they do best – innovate and grow and hire and make sure that the new service and caregiving jobs being created today are jobs that pay well, too. And that does mean raising the national minimum wage.

So many of these are so personal to us that they need to be respected and lifted up. And I know too that we’ve got work to do to stand with those who are fighting for raising the minimum wage. It’s not always how we think about this, but I can tell you another engine for growth and job creation would be comprehensive immigration reform.

It will bring millions of workers into the formal economy so you don’t have an unlevel playing field, so that workers who are competing for those jobs don’t get undercut because employers go out and find undocumented workers to do those jobs for a lower wage. I really believe it’s not just the right thing to do, but it will be great.

It will be smart for our economy. I want people to be able to compete. I don’t want to have that disadvantage that exists in too many places, where people are being are being priced out of the jobs they’ve always done.

So we can work toward a full employment and full potential economy. That does mean we can’t ignore people that are still stuck on the sidelines, or working part-time when what they really want is a full-time job. Or those trapped in long-term joblessness, whether they’re veterans, workers with disabilities, people coming home from prison, or young people who tried to start their careers in the midst of the Great Recession. I particularly want young people to feel that they are going to get good jobs that will give them that ladder of opportunity that they deserve to have in America.

That’s why I want to expand incentives like the New Markets Tax Credit, Empowerment Zones, and other ideas that bring business, government, and communities together to create good jobs in poor or remote areas. Places that have lost a factory or a mine where generations of families used to work. Anyone willing to work should get the help they need to qualify for and find that good job.

That means breaking down the barriers of systemic racism and discrimination that hold back – those barriers, they hold back African Americans, Latinos, Asian and Native Americans, and women from fully participating in our economy.

We need to reverse the long-term neglect that has dried up jobs and opportunity in communities of color, in poor communities. It’s not by accident that the unemployment rate now among black Americans is twice as high as among whites. Back in the 90’s, we were closing that gap, incomes were going up for everybody.

I think we’re going to have to invest money to create jobs for young people because right now I’m worried that if young people don’t get that first job when they are young, learn about work, understand the obligations as well as the promise of work, it will be even more difficult to get them into the workforce later on.

It is way past time for us to guarantee equal pay for women, which is still not the reality.

So, you see it is not enough to have an affirmative agenda, we have to knock down those barriers.

And by the way, as you’ve seen here in North Carolina discriminating against LGBT Americans is bad for business.

And make no mistake, we will defend American jobs and American workers by saying ‘no’ to bad trade deals and unfair trade practices, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which does not meet my high bar for creating good-paying jobs. ‘No’ to assaults on the right to organize and bargain collectively.

‘No’ to every attack on the dignity of working families.

We’re going to make this economy work for everyone, and it’s time we start building this from the ground up. For every home and every community all the way to Washington. Now, I know very well that if you don’t have the skills for the jobs oftomorrow, it’s going to be difficult. Education is still the pathway for greater opportunities for many Americans.

Let’s start at the beginning with making quality, affordable childcare and pre-school available in every community in the next 10 years, so we get our littlest Americans off to the best start.

Jim Hunt was a pioneer in this. Why did he care so much about children zero to five, besides the fact that he cared about them? Because he knew there was a direct line to how the youngest children were treated, educated, and prepared for school, and what kind of jobs and economic competitiveness North Carolina would have. So we’re going to start by having families be their child’s first teachers, and we’re going to give them the support they need to do that. And when it comes to primary and secondary education I pledged to you we’re going to make sure all our kids have good teachers and good schools, no matter what zip code you live in.

You know, for many years, thanks to people and leaders like Jim Hunt, North Carolina was a leading state when it came to education. Now, unfortunately, thanks to your Governor McCrory and the legislature, the average teacher salary can barely support a family. It should not be a surprise that thousands have quit in recent years.

We should support our teachers, not scapegoat them.

And then let’s make sure every student has options after high school. Whether it’s a four-year degree, free community college, an apprenticeship, or other forms of higher education We need to provide the skills and credentials that match the job openings of today and tomorrow.

That’s why I’m proposing new tax credits to encourage more companies to offer paid apprenticeships that lets you earn while you learn. And I will to support the union apprenticeships and training programs already out there. Not every good job requires a four-year college degree. We need to dignify skills training. So many young people have the talent and the will to succeed – they just need a helping hand.

That’s why I want us to come together to help our young people break free from the burden of student debt. I’m sure we all have stories. I’ve met so many who told me they can’t start a business. They can’t even move out of their parent’s basement because of all the student debt holding them back.

Let’s set the goal to make debt-free college available to everyone. So future students won’t have to borrow a dime to pay for tuition at public college or university.

And let’s liberate the millions of Americans who already have student debt by making it easier to refinance, just like a mortgage. Let’s make it easier to have debt forgiven by doing national service, let’s make it easier to repay what you owe as a portion of your income so you never have to pay more than you can afford.

I’ve set out a way to do this, and we’ll be talking more about it as we go forward in this campaign.

My third goal is to rewrite the rules so more companies share profits with employees, and fewer ship profits and jobs overseas.

I know there are a lot of businesses thriving here in North Carolina and across our country who see employees as assets to invest in, not costs to cut. They’re building companies, not stripping them. They’re creating good jobs, not eliminating them.

But too many, too many businesses take the opposite view. I’m not asking corporations to be more charitable, although I think that is important. I’m asking corporations to realize that when more Americans prosper, they prosper too, right? When your paycheck grows, America grows.

We are a 70 percent consumption economy. If we want higher growth, we have to raise incomes. So people have more disposable dollars to be able to spend, instead of holding back out of fear of what will happen.

So let’s bring a long-term view back to board rooms and executive suites. Let’s restore the link between productivity growth and wage growth.

As President, I will make it a national priority for more companies to share profits with employees. On top of, not instead of, good wages. Let’s recognize the people doing the work, putting in the hours, they’re the ones who should be sharing the rewards.

We should continue to crack down on wage theft and make overtime count, so companies that pay well can’t be undercut by competitors paying poverty wages.

I believe we should strengthen unions, which have formed the bedrock of a strong middle class. It should be easier to bargain collectively. That’s not only fair, it makes workers more productive, it strengthens our economy.

And let’s close the loopholes that help companies ship jobs and profits overseas. Let’s make companies that outsource jobs to other countries pay back the tax breaks they received while they were here in America. And if corporations try to move their headquarters to a foreign country to skip out on their tax bills – let’s slap a new exit tax on them and then put that money to work in the communities left behind.

And we should extend the rules that were passed in Dodd-Frank on Wall Street after the crisis and strengthen them — both for the big banks and the shadow banking system. And I will veto any reforms to repeal those rules and vigorously enforce the law, with accountability, so Wall Street can never wreck Main Street again.

Fourth, let’s make sure Wall Street, corporations, and the super-rich pay their fair share of taxes.

When people say the game is rigged, the best evidence is the tax code. It’s riddled with scams, loopholes, and special breaks, like the carried interest loophole that lets some hedge fund managers pay a lower tax rate than a teacher or a nurse. That’s not only unfair, it’s bad economics, and we’re going to stop it.

I have been saying that for years. As President, if Congress won’t act, I will ask the Treasury Department to use its authority to close that loophole.

And here’s another idea that I will be pushing: Let’s pass the so-called Buffett Rule so top executives can’t pay a lower rate than their secretaries.

And let’s ask the wealthiest Americans to pay more – including a new tax on multimillionaires. That’s not only the right thing to do, it’s smart for our economy.

Because these steps will help pay for the investments we need in jobs and education without increasing our national debt. In fact, every program I have proposed in this campaign, I tell you how I will pay for it. Donald Trump and I disagree on a lot of things, and one of them is simple math.

Finally, here’s our fifth goal: Let’s put families first and make sure our policies match how you actually work and live in the 21st century.

Families look a lot different today than they did 30 years ago, and so do our jobs.

The movement of women into the workforce has produced enormous economic growth over the past few decades. But with women now the sole or primary breadwinner in a growing number of families – there’s more urgency than ever to make it easier for Americans to be good workers, good parents, and good caregivers, all at the same time.

The old model of work where you could expect to hold a steady job with good benefits for an entire career, is long gone. People in their 20s and 30s have come of age in an economy that’s totally different. And a lot of young parents are discovering just how tough that is on families. Many people now have wildly unpredictable schedules, or they cobble together part time work, or they’ve tried to go independent.

Flexibility can be good, but you shouldn’t have to worry that your family could lose your health care or retirement savings just because you change jobs or start a small business.

Why do you think every other–I have to ask–why do you think every other advanced country has paid family leave? Do you think they are just unrealistic, or do you think that they have figured out they can have a stabler economy, they can support families? And that’s what I want us to do. Working families need predictable scheduling, earned sick days and vacation days, quality affordable childcare and healthcare. These are not luxuries. They’re economic necessities.

In today’s economy, benefits should be flexible, portable, and comprehensive for everyone.

That means it’s time to expand Social Security as well. Especially, especially for older women who are widowed, or have taken time out of the workforce to care for a loved one, and who are suffering financially because of that. We need to look to a secure retirement for everyone, and to provide families relief from crushing costs and health care, housing, and prescription drugs. I looked at the numbers and in some states, two parents earning the minimum wage have to spend up to 35 percent of their income on childcare.

For a single parent, it could be 70 percent. So I will set a goal: families shouldn’t have to pay more than 10 percent of their income for childcare. And I will repeat today what I have said throughout this campaign: I will not raise taxes on the middle class I will give you tax relief to raise these burdens.

Now, you know whenever I talk about these family issues, Donald Trump says I’m playing the ‘woman’ card. Right? Well you know what I say, if fighting for childcare and paid leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in.

Here’s what I want you to understand. It may be difficult to imagine all this getting done and Washington is so broken, I get that – but I really think that progress is possible or I would not be standing up here running to be President of the United States.

I know Republicans and Democrats can work together, because I’ve done it. As you heard Alicia say, I helped create the Children’s Health Insurance Program when I was First Lady. That happened with support with both parties. And it now it covers 8 million kids and when you go to get health care for your child, nobody says, ‘Are you a Republican or Democrat?’ They say, ‘What does your child need?’

I worked with Republicans many times when I was a Senator from New York and as Secretary of State, so I know we can get results that will make real differences in people’s lives.

I know however it’s rare. There’s no question that we need to make Washington work much better than it does today. And that means in particular: getting unaccountable money out of our politics.

One of the reasons this election is so important is because the Supreme Court stands in the balance. We need to overturn that terrible Supreme Court decision, Citizens United, and then go a lot further to reform our whole campaign finance system.

This is about our democracy – but it’s also about our economy. Campaign finance reform and reducing the power of special interests is directly relevant to getting Washington working for the people again – making the right investments, putting your jobs and your economic security first.

That’s why I’m so passionate about this issue, and I’m will fight hard to end the stranglehold that the wealthy and special interests have on so much of our government.

So, let’s do this together. A historic investment in jobs. Debt-free college. Profit sharing. Making those at the top pay their fair share. Putting families first in our modern economy. And a democracy where working people’s voices are actually heard. That is what we are fighting for in this election.

As I said during the primary I am a progressive who likes to get things done and we can do this.

Just for a minute, compare what I am proposing to what we hear from Donald Trump. The self-proclaimed ‘King of Debt’ has no real ideas for making college more affordable or addressing the student debt crisis.  He has no credible plan for rebuilding our infrastructure, apart from his wall. He has no real strategy for creating jobs, just a string of empty promises. Maybe we shouldn’t expect better from someone whose most famous words are, ‘You’re fired.’

Well, here’s what I want you to know: I do have a jobs program. And as President, I’m going to make sure you hear, ‘You’re hired.’

Here’s the bottom line: Economists left, right, and center all agree Donald Trump will drive America back into recession. Just this week, one of Senator John McCain’s former economic advisors said Trump’s policies would wipe out, wipe out three-and-a-half million jobs. His tax cuts tilted toward the wealthy would add more than $30 trillion to our national debt over the next 20 years.

That is just astonishing and it’s no wonder that the Economist Intelligence Unit, one of the leading firms that analyzes the top threats to the global economy, now ranks a Trump Presidency #3, right behind problems in China and volatility in the commodities markets.

Look, I know Donald Trump hates it when anyone points out how hollow his sales pitch really is. I guess my speech yesterday must have gotten under his skin because right away he lashed out on Twitter with outlandish lies and conspiracy theories, and he did the same in his speech today.

Now think about it. He’s going after me personally because he has no answers on the substance. In fact, he doubled down on being the King of Debt.

So all he can do is try to distract us. That’s even why he’s attacking my faith, sigh. And of course attacking a philanthropic foundation that saves and improves lives around the world.

It’s no surprise he doesn’t understand these things. The Clinton Foundation helps poor people around the world get access to life-saving AIDS medicine.

Donald Trump uses poor people around the world to produce his line of suits and ties.  Here in North Carolina, you know as well as anyone that our economy is already too unpredictable for working families. We can’t let Donald Trump bankrupt America the way he bankrupted his casinos. We need to write a new chapter in the American Dream – and it can’t be Chapter 11.

Please, join me in this campaign, I’m offering a very different vision. We’re stronger together. We’re stronger when we grow together. We’re stronger when our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top. I am convinced that if we work hard if we go into November with the confidence and optimism that should be the American birthright, we will not only win an election, we will chart the course to the future that we want and deserve.

Thank you and God bless you.”

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