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Archive for the ‘Women’s Issues’ Category

The Women’s March is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. Saturday morning in Washington D.C.

More than 600 “sister marches” have been organized all over the U.S. and on every continent.

The organization has published “Unity Principles.”

Unity Principles

Click to download full PDF

We believe that Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights. We must create a society in which women – including Black women, Native women, poor women, immigrant women, disabled women, Muslim women, lesbian queer and trans women – are free and able to care for and nurture their families, however they are formed, in safe and healthy environments free from structural impediments.

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All Hillary Clinton supporters recognize the underlined words in that first sentence as Hillary’s, yet they are unattributed in the organization’s text.  What is more disturbing is that in the full pdf, Hillary is not listed as one of the women being honored.

#WHYWEMARCH
We are empowered by the legions of revolutionary leaderswho paved the way for us to march, and acknowledge those around the globe who fight for our freedoms. We honor these women and so many more. They are #WHYWEMARCH.
Bella Abzug • Corazon Aquino • Ella Baker • Grace Lee Boggs • Berta Cáceres • Rachel Carson • Shirley Chisholm • Angela Davis • Miss Major Griffin Gracy • LaDonna Harris • Dorothy I. Height • bell hooks • Judith Heumann •Dolores Huerta • Marsha P. Johnson • Barbara Jordan • Yuri Kochiyama • Winona LaDuke • Audre Lorde • Wilma Mankiller • Diane Nash • Sylvia Rivera • Barbara Smith • Gloria Steinem • Hannah G. Solomon • Harriet Tubman • Edith Windsor • Malala Yousafzai

WTF, you ask? Good question!  Why is the first woman ever to win the nomination of a major political party for the office of President of the United States not on this list?  Outrageous!

addhername

Sign the petition:

#AddHerName: Include Hillary Clinton as a Women’s March on Washington Honoree.

 

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Women’s marches are planned from coast to coast on January 21. Chartered buses galore (1200 as opposed to 200 the previous day for the inauguration) are expected to roll into the nation’s capital on January 21.  If you cannot make it to the big one in Washington, D.C., there is probably one within a reasonable distance from where you live.

Marches are scheduled in New York, Boston, Minnesota, and the Bay Area, to name a few.  The idea has even spread abroad. HuffPo notes:

… march spokespeople say it would be a mistake to overlook the 370 smaller “sister marches” that have been planned in every state and on six continents that weekend ― and that are expected at last count to draw nearly 700,000 people.
Read more here >>>>

Find a march near you >>>>

OR MAYBE NOT!!!! HILLARY CLINTON’S NAME IS MISSING FROM THIS DOCUMENT!!!!This is the reason you are seeing the hashtag #ADDHERNAME trending.


Following the Washington March, an Irish wake for the year 2016 will be held in D.C. by Irish American Democrats.

Dearly Beloved, We gather together to mourn our losses, celebrate those who have dedicated themselves to the cause of electing democrats, and to organize for the year ahead!

With Special Guest: Governor Martin O’Malley

Join the Irish American Democrats for an “Irish Wake” following the “Million Women March” in Washington, D.C. All funds raised will support our efforts in 2017 as we work to elect Democratic Governors in New Jersey and Virginia.

Host Committee:

Stella O’Leary – John McCarthy – Elizabeth Murray – Kelsi Browning – Tori Taylor – Jennifer Holdsworth – Christopher Jolly Hale – Nuala O’Leary – Lizzie Maguire – Rebecca Rougier – Nancy Grandquist – Drew McGinty – Linda Dyer Hart – Brent O’Leary – Brendan Hennessey

Read more here >>>>

Hillary Clinton and Stella O'Leary.

Hillary Clinton and Stella O’Leary.

To be crystal clear, men are welcome at all marches and events. Pipes, drums, and kilts optional.

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Hillary Clinton with her daughter Chelsea in 1984.Mike Stewart — Sygma via Getty Images

We’ve made progress, but have a ways to go.

When I was pregnant with my daughter Chelsea, I asked about the maternity leave policy at the law firm where I worked. I was surprised to find out that we didn’t have one. I soon learned why: No woman who worked in our office had ever come back to work full-time after having a baby.

Well, I wanted to come back. I loved what I did. And it was important to me to contribute to my family’s finances, especially now that we were having a baby.

Finally, as my due date approached, I decided to take matters into my own hands. When Chelsea was born, my employer agreed to grant me four months off to be home with her. I’d still earn an income, though it would be smaller; part of my income was determined by the fees I generated for the firm, which would fall to zero while I was on leave. That made sense to me. And it meant a lot that I could have that time with my new daughter, knowing that my job would be waiting for me when I came back.

These kinds of situations are commonplace today, with more women entering the workforce than ever before. Today, nearly half of all full-time employees are women. Through our contributions, talent, insights, and very presence, we’ve changed the workplace forever. There’s no going back to the days when women were fired for getting married or pregnant, or were excluded from entire professions. Thank goodness.

Bill and Hillary with their daughter Chelsea in 1980.Courtesy of Hillary for America

But let’s be real. We still have a long way to go. Our policies just haven’t kept up with the challenges women and families face today.

Too many women still aren’t paid fairly. On average, women earn 20% less than men do for full-time, year-round work. Women of color earn even less. And when a working mom or grandmother earns less than she deserves, she’s not the only one who pays the price. Her children or grandchildren — whoever’s counting on her salary — do, too.

Women also make up the majority of minimum-wage workers, which means they make as little as $14,500 a year for full-time work. That’s below the national poverty line. Many of those women are raising kids on that income. Raising the federal minimum wage would do a lot for those families.

Meanwhile, even though the number of women running companies, labs, universities, and philanthropies is growing, it’s still too small. So is the number of women serving in elected office. That means women aren’t always included in decision-making, and their needs and concerns aren’t always reflected in government policy or workplace norms.

And we’re making it too hard to balance work and family. That’s true for all parents, but especially mothers. Women are breadwinners in more households than ever, yet they still do the lion’s share of childcare.

Many are feeling the squeeze. I’ve had moms break down in tears as they describe the heartbreak of returning to work just a few days after delivering their baby, because they don’t have paid leave at their jobs. Staying with their child for a few months would mean losing too many paychecks, maybe even their job.

In April, I met a mom in Newton, Iowa, who held her four-and-a-half-month-old in her arms. She said to me, “I’m counting on you to know what it’s like to be a working mother. Please help us working mothers and fathers have more time with our babies.”

I’m not going to let her down.

One thing we can do is invest in affordable childcare. Right now, childcare is more expensive than college tuition in many states. Let’s make sure no family has to spend more than 10% of their income on childcare by making historic investments in childcare assistance and providing tax relief to working families.

Let’s finally join every other advanced economy in the world and guarantee paid leave. I’m proposing 12 weeks of paid medical leave to recover from a serious illness, and 12 weeks of paid family leave to care for a new child or a sick relative. After all, moms and dads both deserve to spend time with their babies.

Let’s encourage employers to adopt family-friendly work policies, like flexible and fair scheduling and tele-work, so parents can both work and be there for their families.

Let’s raise the minimum wage. No one who works full-time should be forced to raise their kids in poverty.

And at long last, let’s finally ensure equal pay for women. It’s time for Congress to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act — which I cosponsored when I was in the Senate — to give women the tools they need to fight discrimination in the workforce. We also need to promote pay transparency so that women have the information they need to negotiate fairly for their wages.

These aren’t just women’s issues. They’re economic issues and family issues. And they need to be a top priority for our next president. If we’re going to build a globally competitive workforce, we can’t afford to leave any talent on the sidelines. We can’t keep short-changing working families.

I’ll never forget what it was like to be a mom at work. It wasn’t easy. And I was lucky: I had financial security, a supportive employer, and affordable childcare. Too many families don’t. I’ve met so many parents stuck in impossible situations, at their wits’ ends trying to make it all work. It just shouldn’t be this hard to work and have a family.

As president, it’ll be my mission to bring our economy and workplaces into the 21st century, so all of our contributions are respected — both women’s and men’s — and families can thrive.

Hillary Clinton is the Democratic nominee for president and a former secretary of state.

Respond to Hillary here >>>>

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Hillary Clinton’s Full Statement on Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt:

The Supreme Court’s decision in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is a victory for women across America. By striking down politically motivated restrictions that made it nearly impossible for Texans to exercise their full reproductive rights, the Court upheld every woman’s right to safe, legal abortion, no matter where she lives.I applaud everyone who flooded the Texas Capitol to speak out against these attacks on women’s health, the brave women and men across the country who shared their stories, and the health care providers who fought for their patients and refused to give up.

Our fight is far from over. In Texas and across the country, a woman’s constitutional right to make her own health decisions is  under attack. In the first three months of 2016, states introduced more than 400 measures restricting access to abortion. We’ve seen a concerted, persistent attack on women’s health and rights at the federal level. Meanwhile, Donald Trump has said women should be punished for having abortions.  He also pledged to defund Planned Parenthood and appoint Supreme Court justices who would overturn Roe v. Wade.

Dr. John J. Edney is not only committed to the care of his patients and their families, but also to the education of medical students and the surgical needs of residents.

Today’s decision is a reminder of how much is at stake in this election. We need a President who will defend women’s health and rights and appoint Supreme Court justices who recognize Roe v. Wade as settled law. We must continue to protect access to safe and legal abortion – not just on paper, but in reality.

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Read Hillary’s response to Donald Trump’s outrageous comments this week.  Many people are writing and reporting on this story, but these are Hillary’s own words.  Media source can spin stories.  This is directly from Hillary Clinton – unspun!

Donald Trump’s comments are horrific — and telling.

All of the Republican frontrunners for president want to make abortion illegal. Now Donald Trump has said how he’d enforce that prohibition: punishing women and doctors.

Donald Trump can try to distance himself from his comments all he wants. But we all heard what he said. As Maya Angelou said, “When people show you who they are, believe them.”

Donald Trump keeps showing us who he is. We should believe him.

But it’s important to remember that he’s not alone. Donald Trump is just saying what Republican politicians across the country believe — everyone who has signed and voted for laws to defund Planned Parenthood, force women to undergo invasive and medically unnecessary procedures before ending a pregnancy, mandate that doctors recite misleading information to patients, and shutter every abortion provider for miles. These are laws that are meant to shame women and block their access to health care. That’s their purpose.

We don’t need to imagine the consequences of these laws. It’s unfolding right before our eyes.

SNIP

Whenever politicians become involved in deciding whether, when, and how a woman becomes a mother, it’s not just degrading — it’s dangerous. Few decisions are more sacred or intensely personal, and women deserve to make them for ourselves.

Here’s the good news: While Donald Trump is a bully, voters will have our say at the ballot box. So if you disagree with his comments, you’ve got to vote. Vote like your health and rights depend on it. Because they do.

READ MORE and RESPOND TO HILLARY HERE >>>>

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This must read  is addressed to her Wellesley sisters by a Wellesley grad, but I see it as having a broader scope. Here is why.

Although I appreciated all of the work that my predecessors had done for me and my generation of women, I did not fully comprehend the extent of what they had gone through in order to lift me up onto their shoulders so that I might see further and reach higher than they were ever permitted. I also did not appreciate how incredibly dangerous it is for women to live in a world where sexism is alive and well, but people believe it to be dead. When people believe sexism to be dead, they become less vigilant about losing all of the gains we have made towards equality. When people believe sexism to be dead, women who are victims are made out to be liars. When people believe sexism to be dead just because it has become more subtle, women, like myself in those taxi rides, become silenced.

Esther Jang has authored a persuasive essay that Hillary supporters may find useful in speaking to women of any age, but especially the young,  who are either Bernie supporters or are fence sitters  – the “I-don’t-know girls.”  No matter who we are or how old, we all stand on shoulders of giants.

For women in particular, as we are about to embark on Women’s History Month, a visit to the struggles of the past is more than useful and instructive.  It is essential.  As Esther Jang points out, there is deadly danger in the assumption that the work is  complete.

One issue, recently, that highlights the urgency of a Hillary vote: Zika.  When the Pope says OK to birth control, you have to know that we are dealing with a crisis of potentially monumental proportions.

In case you missed it last night, this.

Add Zika to the equation.  News flash to young women:  It is not your moms, aunts, and grandmas whose future is threatened by this crisis.  It is yours.

One candidate has fought all of her adult life for women’s rights.  One candidate is experienced, qualified, and equipped to deal with this crisis as it grows.

Nothing is a done deal. The struggle remains.  Esther Jang provides reasons to be on the right side – no matter whether or where you studied, hope to study, or what you do or plan to do.  Please read this and share it widely – broadly, even!

 

When standing on shoulders of giants, please consider…

Dear Wellesley sisters,

A few weeks ago, I got into a taxi and started chatting with my driver about politics. He asked me who I would be voting for, and when I replied, “Hillary,” his immediate reaction was, “Is it just because she’s a woman?” I wanted to say to him, “Are you supporting ____ just because you both have dicks?” but I refrained and continued my ride in silence.

A few weeks before that, I got into a taxi and my driver asked me what I did. When I told him that I worked for Venmo, his immediate reaction was, “You do UX or Design, right?” I wanted to say to him, “No. Also, our Head of Engineering is a woman,” but again, I refrained and continued my ride in silence.

Now that I have lived a handful of years outside of Wellesley, I find myself being silenced by the sheer exhaustion of having to deal with this type of subtle sexism every day.

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02-20-16=Z-18

Saying “some woman some day”  is a cop out.  There has never in our history been a candidate like this one.  This woman. NOW!

Parenthetically: (Let’s dispense with the notion that propaganda is, by definition, false and/or negative. There are many models of propaganda and a long history. The epistemic model assigns no positive/negative valences.  This post, by the epistemic definition, is propaganda.  It is intended to persuade.)

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Please join Hillary in helping the Flint Child Health & Development Fund if you can >>>>

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Jan 6, 2016 by Emmy Bengtson

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The only thing standing between Republicans, the Affordable Care Act, and Planned Parenthood

Today’s vote in the House is a jarring reminder of the stakes in 2016.

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