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Hillary Clinton in Orlando

Hillary hopped on her plane in White Plains and flew to Orlando to rally Floridians.

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In Orlando, Clinton Vows to Protect the Rights of People with Disabilities

In Orlando on Wednesday, Hillary Clinton outlined her vision for an “Inclusive Economy” in the latest in her “Stronger Together” series of speeches. Clinton vowed to fight for an economy that works for every American, not just those at the top, and that welcomes people with disabilities, values their work, rewards them fairly and treats them with respect.

“I’ve always believed that the ultimate test of our society is more than the size of our economy or the strength of our military,” Clinton said. “It’s how we treat our fellow human beings, especially the most vulnerable among us. And on this front especially, I intend for my presidency to move our country forward. Together, we will make our economy and our country more welcoming to people with disabilities, because we all win when everyone gets to share in the American dream.”

Clinton outlined how she is the only candidate with a plan for an economy that includes more people with disabilities. She has been an advocate for people with disabilities from her days at Children’s Defense Fund through her appointment of the first ever Special Advisor for International Disability Rights when she was Secretary of State.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below: “Hello, Orlando! Wow. Thank you all so much. I am so happy to be back and I want to thank all of you for being here today at the Frontline Outreach Youth and Family Center, which does so much good work in the community. I want to acknowledge your terrific mayor, Mayor Buddy Dyer, who was here earlier. I want to thank Pastor Wynn, Tiffany Namey, the chair of the Orange County Disability Caucus, and everyone – especially Val Demings. Where’s Val? Val – I know – got this crowd really whipped up, and I want you to stay whipped up for Val. She is going to be a great member of Congress for everything that we care about and are fighting for.

I want to thank Anastasia for that introduction. Didn’t she do an amazing job? I first met Anastasia when she was nine years old. She raised her hand at a town hall and she said, ‘My twin sister can’t speak. Because of that, they put her in a separate class, apart from the rest of the kids. But she can communicate with a computer. And she’s very smart and would do just as well as anyone else, if the principal and teachers would just give her a chance.’ I was just blown away by this nine-year-old girl – her confidence and how much she loved her sister.

So Anastasia and I have stayed in touch over the years. When she grew up, she became an intern in the Senate. I was so proud of her speech at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia too. And I’m very excited that she’s here with us today.

I also want to thank Orlando. It’s great to be back in this wonderful city with all of you. You’ve been through a lot this year. And what has been so notable is you’ve responded with grace. You’ve shown the world what Orlando is made of – strength, love and kindness. This is something we could all use more of right now.

I’m here today to talk about how to make our economy work for everyone, but first, I need to say something about two very upsetting incidents that took place over the past few days. First, an unarmed man named Terence Crutcher was shot and killed by a police officer in Tulsa. Then, a man named Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by a police officer in Charlotte. I’m sending condolences and prayers to their families; I know a lot of you are as well.

There is still much we don’t know about what happened in both incidents. But we do know that we have two more names to add to a list of African Americans killed by police officers in these encounters. It’s unbearable. And it needs to become intolerable.

We also saw the targeting of police officers in Philadelphia last week. And last night in Charlotte, 12 officers were injured in demonstrations following Keith Lamont Scott’s death. Every day, police officers across our country are serving with extraordinary courage, honor and skill. We saw that again this weekend in New York and New Jersey and Minnesota. Our police handled those terrorist attacks exactly right. And they likely saved a lot of lives. I’ve spoken to many police chiefs and other law enforcement leaders who are as deeply concerned as I am and deeply committed, as I am, to reform. Why? Because they know it is essential for the safety of our communities and our officers. We are safer when communities respect the police and police respect communities.

I’ve also been privileged to spend a lot of time with mothers who have lost children, and young people who feel that, as far as their country’s concerned, their lives seem disposable. We’ve got to do better. And I know we can. And if I’m elected president, we will – and we will do it exactly together, which is the only way it can be done.

Look, I know I don’t have all the answers. I don’t know anyone who does. But this is certain: too many people have lost their lives who shouldn’t have.

Sybrina Fulton has become a friend of mine. Her son, Trayvon Martin, was killed not far from where we are today. Sybrina says, ‘This is about saving our children.’ And she’s absolutely right. We need to come together, work together – white, black, Latino, Asian, all of us – to turn the tide, stop the violence, build the trust. We need to give all of our kids, no matter who they are, the chance to grow up safe and healthy in their communities and in our country.

Now, there are so many issues we need to take on together, and that’s why we’re here today. Because in just 48 days – can you believe it, 48 days – Americans will go to the polls and choose our next president. Well, I hope so. I hope so. I want to just stress that our campaign is about the fundamental belief that, in America, every person, no matter what you look like, who you are, who you love, you should have the chance to go as far as your hard work and dreams will take you. And that is the basic bargain that made our country great, and it’s our job to make sure it’s there for you and future generations.

Building an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, is the central challenge of our time. And I take it personally, because I’m a proud product of the American middle class. My grandfather started working in a lace mill in Scranton, Pennsylvania, when he was just a boy, and worked there for 50 years. Thanks to him, my dad was able to go to college and then start his own small business, printing fabric for draperies. And because of my dad and my mom, I could head out into the world and follow my dreams.

Every American family should be able to write a similar story for themselves and their children. And history has shown us – our history has shown us that the strongest growth in our economy is inclusive, broad-based growth – when everyone can contribute to our prosperity and share in its rewards.

Now, here is just one example. The flood of women into the American workforce over the past several decades was responsible for more than $3.5 trillion in economic growth. But as women’s labor participation has slowed in recent years, due in part to our failure to provide family-friendly policies like paid leave and affordable childcare, so our economic growth wasn’t as strong as it could have been. Women who want to work deserve to work. And whenever they are denied that opportunity, it’s not fair to them – and we all lose out. In a competitive 21st century global economy, we cannot afford to leave talent on the sidelines. When we leave people out or write them off, we not only shortchange them and their dreams, we shortchange our country and our own futures.

That’s one reason why I care so much about supporting working parents. It’s one reason why I’m such a strong supporter of comprehensive immigration reform. Because bringing millions of undocumented workers into the formal economy will decrease abuse and exploitation, and it will increase our economic breath and our tax base. It is estimated if we did this, despite what you hear from the other side, we would increase our gross domestic product by an estimated $700 billion in 10 years. Now, we need that.

It’s also one reason why we’ve got to break down barriers of systemic racism, including under-investment that has held communities of color back for generations. That’s part of building an inclusive economy, too. And it’s why I believe we need to do more to help young people, who are left behind in the wake of the Great Recession, find those strategies and opportunities that will get them moving ahead again. And we’ve got to help older Americans who’ve displaced by automation and outsourcing in our changing economy.

And too often, training and retraining doesn’t work as it should. If you don’t have a four-year degree, if you haven’t really had the chance to upgrade your skills over the years, it’s hard to just make a course correction. We need to have apprenticeships and community college and technical programs, starting in high school and moving all the way up to older workers. Whether you’re trying to start your career or you’ve spent decades contributing to our economy, you deserve better.

Now, these are some of the elements of my plan for an inclusive economy, and I’m going to hold up the book Tim Kaine and I have put out because we’ve actually put in one place all of our plans. You see, we have this old-fashioned idea if we’re asking you to support us, we should tell you what we’re going to do. Right? And today I want to focus on one area that hasn’t gotten enough attention. It concerns a group of Americans who are too often invisible, overlooked, and undervalued, who have so much to offer but are given too few chances to prove it. Now, that’s been true for a long time, and we have to change it.

I’m talking about people with disabilities, men and women, boys and girls, who have talents, skills, ideas, and dreams for themselves and their families just like anybody else. Whether they can participate in our economy and lead rich, full lives that are as healthy and productive as possible is a reflection on us as a country. And right now, in too many ways, we are falling short. We’ve got to face that and do better for everyone’s sake because this really does go to the heart of who we are as Americans. I intend this to be a vital aspect of my presidency.

I want to bring us together as a nation to recognize the humanity and support the potential of all of our people. And I want you to hear this because this is not well-known. Nearly one in five Americans lives with a disability. Now, some of those disabilities are highly visible, some much harder to notice. If you don’t know you know someone with a disability, I promise you, you do. But their disability is just one part of who they are.

Across the country, people with disabilities are running businesses, teaching students, caring for our loved ones. They’re holding public office, making breakthrough scientific discoveries, reporting the news, and creating art that inspires and challenges us. They’re veterans whose service and sacrifice has protected our freedom and kept our country safe. They’re working in the White House. Just last year a young woman named Leah Katz-Hernandez became the first West Wing receptionist who is deaf. So when world leaders come to the White House, the person who greets them is Leah. Think of the message that sends about how our nation sees the talent in everyone.

And Americans with disabilities are working on presidential campaigns. I know because several of my staff and advisors have disabilities, and they’re doing phenomenal work. I’m grateful to them every single day. And people all over America would say the same about their boss, their colleague, their employee, their family member with a disability.

Now, over the past few days, our country has taken leaps forward, not just in recognizing the humanity and dignity of people with disabilities, but in making long-overdue changes in our schools, workplaces, and communities so everyone can be part of our shared American life. Even so, not that long ago if you had a disability – if you couldn’t see, couldn’t walk, lived with dyslexia or muscular dystrophy or some other health issue – that one fact was allowed to define your entire life. Because of that and that alone, the world was closed to you. Not all of it and not for everyone, but for most people, basic essential things that others could do you couldn’t and never would. And that was that.

I saw this for myself, as Anastasia said, years ago when I was just starting out as a young lawyer working with the Children’s Defense Fund. One of my first assignments was to figure out why so many American kids weren’t in school. We looked at census tract numbers and we said, okay. How many young people between five and 18 live in this census tract? Then we would look at school enrollment numbers, and there’d be a gap. And we would say, wait a minute. Where are the kids? Why aren’t they in school?

I went door to door, along with people across our country, going into different communities. I was in New Bedford, Massachusetts. We saw a notable disparity there, and I soon realized that part of the problem was kids were stuck at home because of disabilities. There were kids who were hard of hearing, kids with intellectual disabilities. I remember one little girl in a wheelchair who was smart, curious, desperate to go to school. But that chair held her back. Not all schools had ramps or accessible bathrooms. Most teachers and aides weren’t trained to help her. So she didn’t get to go. It felt like the world had said to her, sorry, kid. Your life just isn’t going to be worth very much. And she and her family weren’t rich. They weren’t powerful. So what could they do about it?

That little girl reminded me of another little girl, my mother. She didn’t face the same challenges, but she, too, was clocked from a full and happy childhood – abandoned by her own parents, raised by grandparents who didn’t want her, and ended up on her own when she was just 14, supporting herself as a housemaid. But then something finally went her way. The woman she worked for encouraged her to finish high school. And that family showed my mother what a happy family looked like. After many lonely years, it was the start of a better life.

The core lesson from her childhood was that none of us gets through life alone. We all have to look out for each other and lift each other up. And I remembered that, sitting with that little girl in a wheelchair. My colleagues and I at the Children’s Defense Fund, along with others, gathered the facts, and we built a coalition of activists and families across America, and together we helped convince Congress to pass a groundbreaking law saying that children with disabilities have the same right to be educated in public school just like any other kids.

So we opened the doors to school, and then some years later I was so excited when the Americans with Disabilities Act finally passed, 26 years ago. It was bipartisan. The notion that workplaces and public spaces belong to everyone was something Democrats and Republicans both supported. And, by the way, I’m proud that some of the Democrats and Republicans who passed that landmark bill are supporting my campaign because they know where my heart is on this.

As Secretary of State, I appointed the first-ever special advisor for international disability rights because I wanted America to stand up for the rights and dignity of people with disabilities all over the world. And over the years, I’ve spent a lot of time working for kids with disabilities. In addition to Anastasia, who spoke at the convention, another young man, Ryan Moore, also spoke there. I first met Ryan when he was 7 years old. I was fighting for health care reform. He was born with a rare form of dwarfism. But he never let that stop him. He’s had so many surgeries, we’ve lost count of them. But his family was always there for them and – for him. And he was the advocate for himself as he got older. Now he’s a college graduate working in the technology department of his local school district. And he’s just one of the most optimistic people you’ll ever meet.

Listening to Ryan and Anastasia tell their stories at the convention this July made me think about all the people who never got the chance, never got the chance to get the education, let alone go to college, become forces for change. And I thought about all of the mothers and fathers across America who love their children more than anything and want so badly for them to have every opportunity that they deserve to have in America.

I’ll never forget something that the actor Christopher Reeve said. Some of you may be too young to know who he was. He was a huge star. He played Superman. He was unbelievably good-looking. He and his wonderful wife were friends of mine. And then he was paralyzed in a horse-riding accident. He once said that he had been thinking about a phrase that comes up a lot in our politics, ‘family values.’ ‘Since my accident,’ he said, ‘I’ve found a definition that seems to make sense. I think it means that we’re all family and we all have value.’ I couldn’t agree more.

We’ve come a long way since the fall of 1973, when I was going door to door talking to kids and families. But make no mistake. We still have a lot more work to do. We can’t be satisfied, not when over 60 percent of adults with disabilities aren’t in the workforce, not when businesses are allowed to pay employees with disabilities a subminimum wage [cheers and applause], not when people with physical and intellectual disabilities are still subjected to stigma and discrimination every single day. We’ve got to build an inclusive economy that welcomes people with disabilities, values their work, treats them with respect.

Now, one advocate after another has told me the same thing, ‘We don’t want pity. We want paychecks. We want the chance to contribute.’ As president, I’m going to give – give them that chance. First, we’re going to focus on jobs and incomes. I’m going to fight to give more Americans with disabilities the chance to work alongside those without disabilities and do the same jobs for the same pay and benefits. People with disabilities shouldn’t be isolated. They should be given the chance to work with everyone else. And we’re going to eliminate the subminimum wage, which is a vestige from an ugly, ignorant past. Good work deserves fair pay, no matter who you are.

Second, we’re going to work with our colleges and universities to make them more accessible to students with disabilities. To have a truly inclusive economy, we need a truly inclusive education system. So let’s raise our standards. For too long, accessibility has been an afterthought. Let’s make it a priority in our curriculums, our classrooms, and the technology our students use. It’s like what Anastasia said about her sister. She can communicate through a computer. Then let’s make sure kids who can communicate that way have the opportunity to do so.

Third, we’re going to partner with businesses and other stakeholders to ensure those living with a disability can get hired and stay hired. As part of that, we’ll launch a new effort we’re calling Autism Works to help people with autism succeed in the workplace.

Fourth, let’s build on the success of the Americans with Disabilities Act by finally ratifying the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It has the strong backing of leaders across the political spectrum, and it’s a chance to show American values and American leadership. And I have to tell you ever since I was first lady, I have had the great privilege of traveling the world on behalf of our country. When I was secretary of state, I went to 112 countries. And one of the things that I have noticed is how far behind many countries are in how they treat people with disabilities. Very often people with disabilities from the time they are babies and toddlers are locked away, basically forgotten. I want us since we have been the leader in this area to get that ratified and then to demonstrate to other countries what we have done and are doing to give dignity and opportunity to people with disabilities.

Now, these ideas are just a start. We’re working with advocates to come up with even more. If you’ve got an idea, we want to hear it. Go to hillaryclinton.com and leave your ideas because we are really welcoming this debate. This issue is very close to my heart.

I’ve always believed that the ultimate test of our society is more than the size of our economy or the strength of our military. It’s how we treat our fellow human beings, especially the most vulnerable among us. And on this front especially, I intend for my presidency to move our country forward. Together, we will make our economy and our country more welcoming to people with disabilities because we all win when everyone gets to share in the American dream.

Now, if you want some proof, let me tell you this story. It’s a story of a woman named Freia David. Now, some of you may have read about Freia in the Boston Globe. I’ve carried a copy of that article around with me because I loved it so much. Freia has Down syndrome. When she was 21, she got her first job, at the local McDonald’s. Her mother was a little worried, as any mother would be. She wondered, would Freia be able to handle being independent? Could she handle the job? Would she even pass the six-month training program? Well, not everyone in her class passed, but Freia did. And then – then she excelled at that job for 32 years. Her colleagues loved her, and she loved them. The restaurant became such a home to her that she’d bring her family there on off days just to hang out.

Earlier this year, Freia began to show signs of early-onset dementia. She knew that meant she had to stop working, but 32 years is a pretty good run, isn’t it? It broke her heart. One thing that made it a little better is the whole staff threw a party in her honor. Her family hoped a few people might show up. And in the end, nearly 100 people did: customers, colleagues and friends from over the years. The party lasted three hours. And at one point, one of Freia’s former managers asked for everyone’s attention. She turned to Freia, and she said, ‘We love you. We appreciate you. We respect you. And we are all better people for having you in our lives.’

My friends, after years of hard work and treating people right, isn’t that what we all want to hear? Isn’t that America at our best? We don’t thrive on tearing each other apart, or separating ourselves. We know we are stronger together. We believe in equality and dignity for all. And when we fall short, we strive to do better, not to blame and scapegoat but to improve ourselves, to move toward becoming that more perfect union that our founders hoped for. This election is a chance for us to move still closer to that goal, to make sure everyone can contribute to a growing and prospering America, to say loudly and clearly in this country, no one’s worthless, no one’s ‘less than.’ We’re all of value. In the United States of America, the greatest country in the world, we believe everyone is created equal. And you know what else we believe? We all believe love trumps hate.

Thank you all.”

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STAND

 

 

Yesterday morning, in the wake of the incident in Tulsa where Terence Crutcher was killed near his stalled SUV, Hillary said this in an interview with Steve Harvey.

And we’ve got to tackle systemic racism – this horrible shooting again. How many times do we have to see this in our country? In Tulsa, an unarmed man with his hands in the air? I mean, this is just unbearable, and it needs to be intolerable.

And so maybe I can, by speaking directly to white people, say, look, this is not who we are. We’ve got to do everything possible to improve policing, to go right at implicit bias. There are good, honorable, cool-headed police officers. We have seen them in action in New York over the last 48 hours because of the terrorist attacks. We can do better. We have got to rein in what is absolutely inexplicable. And we have got to have law enforcement respect communities and communities respect law enforcement because they have to work together.

Terence Crutcher was a dad of four whose car, an SUV kid-ferrying vehicle, broke down.  And now this … tonight.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A chaotic scene has erupted in the night in North Charlotte after an African-American man was shot and killed in an officer-involved shooting.

Police say they were serving an outstanding warrant when they came upon Keith Lamont Scott in his car.  They say Scott got out, had a gun on him, and put the officers in imminent danger.  Officer Brentley Vinson shot Scott.

“Man was in his truck, reading a book waiting for his kid to come home,” said a man on scene.  “Cops shot him, for nothing.”

Emergency services were called to the scene where they transported Scott to Carolinas Medical Center where he was pronounced dead.

Read more >>>>

This was the first thing I saw … on Twitter.  This is Charlotte – tonight.

Then this.

#KeithLamontScott is trending on Twitter right now as I type. No news organization covered this in the late evening news nor is any cable outlet there on the streets of Charlotte reporting. They are repeating earlier shows about the election and about the NY-NJ bomber. You can go through the Twitterfeed yourself and see what people are saying.  Keith Lamont Scott, a disabled dad, was sitting in his car reading a book – perceived (?)  to have been a gun (in an open carry state)  – who knows how – while waiting for his child’s school bus.

Meanwhile, on cable news, Donald Trump is saying African-American communities are in “the worst shape that they’ve ever been in before ever, ever, ever.”  Apparently he is so smart that he skipped the grades where they learned about slavery and Jim Crow. Surely, privileged as he is, he never rode in cars through the Jim Crow South as a kid.  I did. He never saw it first hand or drank from the wrong fountain.

We have a lot to talk about in this country. The news channels tonight should have been covering this story rather than Trump’s words. John King was on with Anderson Cooper talking about Charlotte and apparently was unaware of this upheaval in the streets of that city due to another killing.  How can that be for an organization that does nothing but news?

Finally! At 1:23 EDT CNN covers this. Not really – announces it.

Hillary Clinton is ready to talk about this.  Hillary, in fact is ready for anything, including Donald Trump and all of his threats against her and everyone else.

There are no magic wands and there is no “messiah” who is the only one who can simply say a magic word and stop terrorism or street violence whether it be police overreaction or gang related.  One candidate has plans and task forces in place to address these issues. She refuses to overpromise, but she promises to work hard on these issues and others for all of us.

Here is what the past four days demonstrate: Sometimes it is a really good thing that police have military-grade equipment – NY and NJ.  Without that gear, more bombs might have detonated and more people might have been hurt.  When those injuries happened, mysteriously, no one asked the races or religions of the victims.  We were just glad they were saved.  Other times, when people are angry and take to the streets, overuse of that equipment can exacerbate the situation.  Also, sometimes, it is hard to discern the good guys from the bad, but when the whole neighborhood is out – let’s assume they are not all the bad guys.  Let’s be careful in our assessments. Careful.  And let’s be careful when we vote.  Hillary got out in front of the issues here with plans that she made public and with expert teams.

Here is what we know about Hillary:  She will reach out to the Crutcher and Scott families. She will ask what she can do.

 

STAND

 

 

 

 

ICYMI: Hillary Clinton Appears on “The Steve Harvey Morning Show”

Today, Hillary Clinton appeared on Steve Harvey’s morning show to discuss her campaign built on the belief that we are stronger together when we are inclusive. Clinton laid out her plans to help African American families by building an economy for all, make college affordable and supporting Historically Black Colleges and Universities.  Clinton also addressed the death of Terence Crutcher and said, “…this is just unbearable, and it needs to be intolerable.”

Listen to the interview here.

statement

STAND

HFA Response to Report that Trump Foundation Used Charity Money to Settle Legal Problems

In response to David Fahrenthold’s latest story in the Washington Post on Trump’s Foundation, HFA Deputy Communications Director Christina Reynolds offered the following statement:

“Clearly the Trump Foundation is as much a charitable organization as Trump University is an institute of higher education. Trump’s version of charity is taking money from others to settle his own legal issues and buy at least two pictures of himself, which experts say is a clear violation of laws governing charitable organizations. Once again, Trump has proven himself a fraud who believes the rules don’t apply to him. It’s past time for him to release his tax returns to show whether his tax issues extend to his own personal finances.”

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Trump used $258,000 from his charity to settle legal problems

Washington Post

By David A. Fahrenthold

September 20, 2016

Donald Trump spent more than a quarter-million dollars from his charitable foundation to settle lawsuits that involved the billionaire’s for-profit businesses, according to interviews and a review of legal documents.

Those cases, which together used $258,000 from Trump’s charity, were among four newly documented expenditures in which Trump may have violated laws against “self-dealing” — which prohibit nonprofit leaders from using charity money to benefit themselves or their businesses.

In one case, from 2007, Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Club faced $120,000 in unpaid fines from the town of Palm Beach, Fla., resulting from a dispute over the size of a flagpole.

In a settlement, Palm Beach agreed to waive those fines — if Trump’s club made a $100,000 donation to a specific charity for veterans. Instead, Trump sent a check from the Donald J. Trump Foundation, a charity funded almost entirely by other people’s money, according to tax records.

The check to charity from the Trump Foundation.

In another case, court papers say one of Trump’s golf courses in New York agreed to settle a lawsuit by making a donation to the plaintiff’s chosen charity. A $158,000 donation was made by the Trump Foundation, according to tax records.

The other expenditures involved smaller amounts. In 2013, Trump used $5,000 from the foundation to buy advertisements touting his chain of hotels in programs for three events organized by a D.C. preservation group. And in 2014, Trump spent $10,000 of the foundation’s money for a portrait of himself bought at a charity fundraiser.

Or, rather, another portrait of himself.

Several years earlier, Trump had used $20,000 from the Trump Foundation to buy a different, six foot-tall portrait.

If the Internal Revenue Service were to find that Trump violated self-dealing rules, the agency could require him to pay penalty taxes or to reimburse the foundation for all the money it spent on his behalf. Trump is also facing scrutiny from the office of the New York attorney general, which is examining whether the foundation broke state charity laws.

More broadly, these cases also provide new evidence that Trump ran his charity in a way that may have violated U.S. tax law and gone against the moral conventions of philanthropy.

“I represent 700 nonprofits a year, and I’ve never encountered anything so brazen,” said Jeffrey Tenenbaum, who advises charities at the Venable law firm in Washington. After The Post described the details of these Trump Foundation gifts, Tenenbaum described them as “really shocking.”

“If he’s using other people’s money — run through his foundation — to satisfy his personal obligations, then that’s about as blatant an example of self-dealing [as] I’ve seen in a while,” Tenenbaum said.

The Post sent the Trump campaign a detailed list of questions about the four cases, but received no response.

The New York attorney general’s office declined to comment when asked whether its inquiry would cover these new cases of possible self-dealing.

Trump founded his charity in 1987 and, for years, was its only donor. But in 2006, Trump gave away almost all of the money he had donated to the foundation, leaving it with just $4,238 at year’s end, according to tax records.

Then, he transformed the Trump Foundation into something rarely seen in the world of philanthropy: a name-branded foundation, whose namesake provides none of its money. Trump gave relatively small donations in 2007 and 2008, and afterward: nothing. The foundation’s tax records show no donations from Trump since 2009.

Its money has come from other donors, most notably pro-wrestling executives Vince and Linda McMahon, who gave a total of $5 million from 2007 to 2009, tax records show. Trump remains the foundation’s president, and he told the IRS in his latest public filings that he works half an hour per week on the charity.

The Post has previously detailed other cases in which Trump used the charity’s money in a way that appeared to violate the law.

In 2013, for instance, the foundation gave $25,000 to a political group supporting Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi (R). That gift was made around the same time that Bondi’s office was considering whether to investigate fraud allegations against Trump University. It didn’t.

Tax laws say nonprofits such as the Trump Foundation may not make political gifts. Trump staffers blamed the gift on a clerical error. After The Post reported on the gift to Bondi’s group this spring, Trump paid a $2,500 penalty tax and reimbursed the Trump Foundation for the $25,000 donation.

In other instances, it appeared that Trump may have violated rules against self-dealing.

In 2012, for instance, Trump spent $12,000 of the foundation’s money to buy a football helmet signed by NFL quarterback Tim Tebow.

And in 2007, Trump’s wife, Melania, bid $20,000 for the six-foot-tall portrait of Trump, done by a “speed painter” during a charity gala at Mar-a-Lago. Later, Trump paid for the painting with $20,000 from the foundation.

In those cases, tax experts said, Trump was not allowed to simply keep these items and display them in a home or business. They had to be put to a charitable use.

Trump’s campaign has not responded to questions about what became of the helmet or the portrait.

The four new cases of possible self-dealing were discovered in the Trump Foundation’s tax filings. While Trump has refused to release his personal tax returns, the foundation’s filings are required to be public.

The case involving the flagpole at Trump’s oceanfront Mar-a-Lago Club began in 2006, when the club put up a giant American flag on the 80-foot pole. Town rules said flagpoles should be 42 feet high at most. Trump’s contention, according to news reports, was: “You don’t need a permit to put up the American flag.”

The town began to fine Trump, $1,250 a day.

Trump’s club sued in federal court, saying that a smaller flag “would fail to appropriately express the magnitude of Donald J. Trump’s . . . patriotism.”

They settled.

The town waived the $120,000 in fines. In September 2007, Trump wrote the town a letter, saying he had done his part as well.

“I have sent a check for $100,000 to Fisher House,” he wrote. The town had chosen Fisher House, which runs a network of comfort homes for the families of veterans and military personnel receiving medical treatment, as the recipient of the money. Trump added that, for good measure, “I have sent a check for $25,000” to another charity, the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial.

Trump provided the town with copies of the checks, which show that they came from the Trump Foundation.

In the town of Palm Beach, nobody seems to have objected that the fines assessed on Trump’s business were being erased by a donation from a charity.

“I don’t know that there was any attention paid to that at the time. We just saw two checks signed by Donald J. Trump,” said John Randolph, the Palm Beach town attorney. “I’m sure we were satisfied with it.”

Excerpt from a settlement filed in federal court in 2007.

In the other case in which a Trump Foundation payment seemed to help settle a legal dispute, the trouble began with a hole-in-one.

In 2010, a man named Martin Greenberg hit a hole-in-one on the 13th hole while playing in a charity tournament at Trump’s course in Westchester County, N.Y.

Greenberg won a $1 million prize. Briefly.

Later, Greenberg was told that he had won nothing. The prize’s rules required that the shot had to go 150 yards. But Trump’s course had allegedly made the hole too short.

Greenberg sued.

Eventually, court papers show, Trump’s golf course signed off on a settlement that required it to make a donation of Martin Greenberg’s choosing. Then, on the day that the parties informed the court they had settled their case, a $158,000 donation was sent to the Martin Greenberg Foundation.

That money came from the Trump Foundation, according to the tax filings of both Trump’s and Greenberg’s foundations.

Greenberg’s foundation reported getting nothing that year from Trump personally or from his golf club.

Both Greenberg and Trump have declined to comment.

Several tax experts said that the two cases appeared to be clear cases of self-dealing, as defined by the tax code.

The Trump Foundation had made a donation, it seemed, so that a Trump business did not have to.

Rosemary E. Fei, a lawyer in San Francisco who advises nonprofits, said both cases clearly fit the definition of self-dealing.

“Yes, Trump pledged as part of the settlement to make a payment to a charity, and yes, the foundation is writing a check to a charity,” Fei said. “But the obligation was Trump’s. And you can’t have charitable foundation paying off Trump’s personal obligations. That would be classic self-dealing.” In another instance, from 2013, the Trump Foundation made a $5,000 donation to the D.C. Preservation League, according to the group and tax filings. That nonprofit’s support has been helpful for Trump as he has turned the historic Old Post Office Pavilion on Washington’s Pennsylvania Avenue NW into a luxury hotel.

The Trump Foundation’s donation to that group bought a “sponsorship,” which included advertising space in the programs for three big events that drew Washington’s real estate elite. The ads did not mention the foundation or anything related to charity. Instead, they promoted Trump’s hotels, with glamorous photos and a phone number to call to make a reservation.

“The foundation wrote a check that essentially bought advertising for Trump hotels?” asked John Edie, the longtime general counsel for the Council on Foundations, when a Post reporter described this arrangement. “That’s not charity.”

The last of the four newly documented expenditures involves the second painting of Trump, which he bought with charity money.

It happened in 2014, during a gala at Mar-a-Lago that raised money for Unicorn Children’s Foundation — a Florida charity that helps children with developmental and learning disorders.

The gala’s main event was a concert by Jon Secada. But there was also an auction of paintings by Havi Schanz, a Miami Beach-based artist.

One was of Marilyn Monroe. The other was a four foot-tall portrait of Trump: a younger-looking, mid-’90s Trump, painted in acrylic on top of an old architectural drawing.

Trump bought it for $10,000.

Afterward, Schanz recalled in an email, “he asked me about the painting. I said, ‘I paint souls, and when I had to paint you, I asked your soul to allow me.’ He was touched and smiled.”

A few days later, the charity said, a check came from the Trump Foundation. Trump himself gave nothing, according to Sharon Alexander, the executive director of the charity.

Trump’s staff did not respond to questions about where that second painting is now. Alexander said she had last seen it at Trump’s club.

“I’m pretty sure we just left it at Mar-a-Lago,” she said, “and his staff took care of it.”

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Hillary Clinton’s Open Letter to Wells Fargo Customers

Dear Wells Fargo Customers,

In America, we have faith that when we open up a checking account, we aren’t opening ourselves up to being scammed.  Whether you use a local credit union or community bank or one of the big national chains, we take it for granted that those institutions are fulfilling this basic responsibility to their consumers.

That’s why I was deeply disturbed when, last week, we found out that Wells Fargo had engaged in widespread illegal practices over many years.  The bank secretly opened up millions of accounts for customers without their consent – betraying their customers, misusing their personal information and leading many to be slapped with unjust fees and other charges. Today, Wells Fargo’s CEO will appear before Congress. He owes all of you a clear explanation as to how this happened under his watch.

There is simply no place for this kind of outrageous behavior in America.

Our economy depends on a strong and safe banking system to help keep it moving.  But even after Americans spent years working hard to recover from the Great Recession, the culture of misconduct and recklessness that preceded that crisis too often persists.

I have a plan to address it.

First, we need to defend the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  The unfair and abusive practices at Wells Fargo remind us that we need tough watchdogs looking out for customers.  The CFPB worked with local authorities and enforced the law – assessing its highest penalty ever, and bringing the bank’s illegal activity into the national spotlight.

Donald Trump, the Republican Party, and Wall Street lobbyists are desperate to dismantle this effective agency, which is dedicated solely to protecting consumers from unfair and deceptive practices.  I won’t let them put the CFPB under their thumb.  I’ll protect the CFPB and make sure it can continue its essential work on behalf of the American people.

Second, we need real consequences when firms on Wall Street break the law. This past week, we learned that one of the Wells Fargo executives that oversaw the division that ripped off its customers left the bank – not with a pink slip, but with a $125 million payout.  It’s hard to imagine that top executives were unaware of a problem that involved thousands of the firm’s employees.  After all, they imposed sales targets and compensation incentives in ways that led to this behavior.  And it’s frustrating that a bank can simply pay a fine and keep doing business as usual – with massive compensation for the executives responsible.  That compensation should be clawed back.

I’ve put forward an agenda to enhance accountability on Wall Street. Executives should be held individually accountable when rampant illegal activity happens on their watch.  Their compensation should take a hit if their companies pay major fines.  And they must face appropriate legal consequences if they break the law.

Third, we need to make sure that no financial institution is too big to manage.  I’ll put additional safeguards in place to address the risks that the big banks continue to pose to our system.  And if any bank can’t be managed effectively, it should be broken up.

I’ll appoint regulators who will stand with taxpayers and consumers, not with big banks and their friends in Congress.  I’ll fight hard to make sure that Wall Street is working for Main Street – not the other way around.

We need to keep pushing to make the financial system safer and fairer. Let’s do it together.

Sincerely,

Hillary Clinton

Statements-Fact-sheets

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Hillary taped a visit with Jimmy Fallon on Friday (i.e. before the terrorist attacks of the weekend).  The show aired Monday night.

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Jimmy greeted her with a surgical mask and hand sanitizer.

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Jimmy found a bag left behind in Hillary’s dressing room by Donald Trump on his visit last week.

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The contents were a framed picture of Putin, a CD, and a bag of softballs.

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Hillary told Jimmy she played softball on the “Good ‘n’ Plenty” team.  She pitched and played outfield.  I also played outfield.  I always took Hillary for a shortstop.  Seems to me she can be wherever she needs to be – wherever the ball is coming down.

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They discussed serious campaign issues and there were lighter moments with letters from kids which you can find at Hillary’s Tumblr.

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In an afternoon reminiscent of her days as secretary of state, Hillary spent her afternoon in New York meeting with foreign dignitaries in town for the U.N. General Assembly.

Campaign 2016 Clinton

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton shakes hands with with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko in New York, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Abe, Clinton affirm importance of U.S.-Japan alliance

U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (L) and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands in New York on Sept. 19, 2016. They affirmed the importance of the U.S.-Japan alliance for stability in Asia. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo

Campaign 2016 Clinton

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, right, in New York, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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