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Hillary was in Las Vegas on Tuesday.  She spoke at the AFSCME convention and also attended a voter registration event at UNITE HERE which endorsed her.

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In Las Vegas, UNITE HERE Endorses Hillary Clinton

At a voter registration event in Las Vegas on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton thanked UNITE HERE for their endorsement and reiterated her commitment to fighting for working families as president, repealing the Cadillac Tax, and passing comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship. Pointing to Trump’s history of battling against unionization at his Las Vegas hotel, Clinton pledged to build an economy that works for everyone—not just those at the top

Clinton also highlighted a new voter registration drive to get more than 3 million Americans to register or commit to vote in this November’s election. She featured an online voter registration tool in both English and Spanish, and encouraged supporters to volunteer for a voter registration shift.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below: “Wow, didn’t Celia do a great job?  Let’s give her another round of applause. I am so excited to be here with all of you, and to have this endorsement of such a diverse group of hardworking people who are the backbone of our economy, not only here in Las Vegas and Nevada, but across the United States. And I promise you that I will be your champion in the White House.

I want to endorse someone you know well because you also worked to elect him, to nominate him.  That is Ruben Kihuen.  I’ve got to say, Ruben is someone who I admire and like so much.  You’ve got to get him elected to Congress so he and I can work together in 2017.

I want to thank Ivana and Ted and […] and all of the officers and everyone who is here, because this is an important moment for my campaign.  We are going to work together to turn back the tide – the tide of negativity, the tide of violence and bigotry and bullying.  I know that Donald Trump fought against you at his Las Vegas hotel.  I was with you twice in front of the property on a picket line. Because I believe we have got to recognize that unions have helped to build the strongest middle class in the history of the world. I have supported your efforts here and in Atlantic City.  I was there about a week and a half ago, visiting another picket line, in front of another property that Trump used to own and the new owners are refusing to recognize the union.

This is no way, my friends, to grow the economy, to give people a chance to have their own dreams fulfilled – and I know Las Vegas is full of dreamers. Whether you’re working in a hotel on the strip or whether you’re in some other role and job, you expect when you make a contract with somebody, that they fulfill it, right?  You expect, under our law, when you win an election to unionize, they negotiate.  But that’s not Donald Trump’s way.  He not only refuses to negotiate with you, he actually refuses to pay bills of businesses that provide services and goods for his properties. He stiffs – he stiffs small businesses, contractors, workers too.  Why, just here in Las Vegas, he refused to pay $400,000 to a local drapery company. Somebody who had a contract and thought, “Okay, I’ve got a contract.  I’m going to provide the draperies,” and when the time came after the work was done, and Trump and his officials said, “No, we’re not going to pay you.”  So that small company had to close their factory.

I got to tell you, this is par for the course.  Even I have been surprised.  This goes way beyond politics, where you criticize somebody.  That’s fair game.  But his record of exploiting people, of mistreating them by refusing to pay up, whether you’re a union worker with UNITE HERE, you’re a small businessperson, you’re an investor – it doesn’t matter to him.  He’s going to try to avoid paying what he should.  Now, he thinks that’s smart business.  I think it’s disgraceful. And you can hear what they’re saying.  I don’t know if any of you subjected yourselves to watching the Republican convention last night.  This is a very smart group of people.  Well, you didn’t miss anything.  They don’t have a single idea about how to put people to work – how to grow incomes, improve education or health care.  Not a single idea.  Their ideas are all about turn the clock back, stop the progress we’ve made.

Well, I’ll tell you what, I want to make the biggest investment in new jobs since World War II.  I want to get incomes rising again. I want to make college debt-free for all of you […].  I want to help you if you’ve got student debt to pay it back at a lower rate […] I want to rewrite the rules so that companies actually share their profits with employees. It’s time we end them shipping off jobs and profits overseas.  I want to make sure that the corporations and the super-rich in particular pay their fair share of taxes, and that means I’m the only candidate who ran for president this time who said over and over and over again, I will not raise taxes on the middle class.

And we are going to work to change our policies to support the way families live and the jobs they do in the 21st century.  And that includes why I’ve called on Congress to repeal the Cadillac tax on your health benefits. But I got to be clear with you.  We can’t do any of this unless we win. It doesn’t do us any good being here in July, applauding and yelling about Donald Trump and his terrible ideas if we don’t get out and win.

Yesterday our campaign launched a nationwide drive to register 3 million more people (applause) who we will ask to commit to vote in November.  We are having over 500 registration events just this week across America.  We are creating an online, one place to go, voter registration tool in both English and Spanish. We are having labor mobilization weekends starting in August because I know there’s nobody, nobody, better at organizing and mobilizing than Unite Here. I am going to fight for every vote in this state, in every part of this state.  And with your help, we are going to win this state in November.

So here is what I ask of you.  Please, get others to sign up for voter registration.  Come to one of our offices here in Clark County, across Nevada.  Bring friends.  Bring five friends.  And here’s what I want you to tell your friends.  We are hiring people. We are hiring people to work on this registration effort.  If you know somebody who’s interested or you are interested, go to HillaryClinton.com/jobs because we’re not leaving anything to chance.

I was thinking about coming back out here for today, and I was remembering all of the great times that I had here in Las Vegas.  And yeah, what happens in Vegas. But also, I was thinking about all the people who helped in the caucus, all the people who were there on the front lines, working so hard.  (Applause.)  I was thinking about all the hotels that I visited, all of the back of the house cafeterias and workrooms that I visited.  And I was thinking of coming here to this training facility and seeing the pride on people’s faces as you learn your trade.  I was so touched because what I’ve seen here are hard-working people, people who do their very best to get ahead and stay ahead.  You deserve an economy that works for everybody, not just those at the top, and you deserve a government that works for everybody, not just those at the top.

So we’re proud of this.  In America, whether you’ve been here 10 generations or 10 weeks, in America we don’t tear each other down.  We lift each other up. In America, we don’t build walls.  We build bridges. In America, we work together because we know we are stronger together, just like all of you know.  In this union, you are stronger together.  I want everybody in America to know.  Let’s pull together.  Let’s set forth.  I journey to the future with confidence and optimism.  Let’s make sure we bring everybody along.

That is what is at stake in this election.  With your help, we’re going to win this state.  We’re going to win the election in November.  And then we’re going to go on and work to make the future […]”

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If I had a dollar for every time over almost eight years that I have heard Hillary Clinton explain, in so many countries as well as here at home, that we have regular, peaceful transitions of power in this country, I would give every dollar to Hillary for America.

Most recently, she made what has become a boilerplate remark of hers about our democracy when she appeared with President Obama in Charlotte.

Some of you might remember, that he and I competed against each other as hard as we could back in 2008. But when it was over, I was proud to endorse him and campaign for him.

And I’ll never forget when he called me the Sunday after the election, asking me to come to Chicago. It turned out he wanted me to be Secretary of State, and I don’t think anybody saw that coming – especially me.

And as I travelled on behalf of our country, a lot of people around the world asked how President Obama and I could work so well together after being such fierce competitors. In some places, the person who loses an election gets exiled or executed, not asked to be Secretary of State.

But President Obama asked me to serve, and I accepted. You know why? We both love our country.

That is how democracy is supposed to work. We just celebrated 240 years of independence. In America, we put common interest before self-interest. We stand together because we know we’re stronger together.

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So it it especially jarring and disconcerting to hear crowds at the Republican Convention in Cleveland chanting “Lock her up.!”  Really?

The Republican convention’s fixation on locking up Hillary Clinton is really disturbing

CLEVELAND — It’s pretty disturbing to hear a large crowd at a major party convention repeatedly call for the jailing of the leader of the other major party.

And I’ve heard that happen again and again at the Republican convention so far, as the clear favorite chant of the attendees is: “Lock her up! Lock her up! Lock her up!”

It’s not just the crowd. Three speakers at the podium on the first day of the convention called for Hillary Clinton to be jailed.

And Chris Christie’s speech on day two, while nominally a critique of Clinton’s foreign policy judgment, was framed as a “prosecution” of Clinton in which he repeatedly asked the crowd whether she was “guilty” or “not guilty.”

Naturally, the crowd interrupted Christie four times with the “lock her up” chant. Indeed, the idea of sentencing Clinton to prison has been the only thing that’s really excited the crowd so far on this listless second day.

To me, all this seemed like a new crossing of a line and an ugly degradation of a norm in American politics.

Read more >>>>

 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton Speaks at the Old State House in Springfield, Ill., July 13, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton Speaks at the Old State House in Springfield, Ill., July 13, 2016.
Photo by Andrew Harnik/AP

The GOP’s preoccupation with imprisoning Clinton isn’t normal

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At any major party’s national convention, partisans aren’t going to use kid gloves when going after the other party’s nominee. It stands to reason that when Republicans target Hillary Clinton in Cleveland this week, they’re going to use every possible line of attack they can think of. It’s just how the game is played.
But Vox’s Andrew Prokop picked up on GOP messaging from the first night of the Republican National Convention that goes much further than anything Americans are accustomed to.
One of the most striking recurring suggestions of the Republican convention’s first day was that Hillary Clinton should be sent to prison.
During retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s speech, the delegates began to chant, “Lock her up! Lock her up! Lock her up!” Soon, Flynn agreed, saying, “Lock her up, that’s right! It’s unbelievable!”
After noting some other speakers who called for Clinton’s imprisonment, Prokop’s piece added, “To me, all this seemed like a new crossing of a line and an ugly degradation of a norm in American politics.”
He’s not the only who thought so. Independent Journal Review’s Justin Green, a conservative journalist, added, “Plagiarism is bad, but it’s remarkable that the headline news today isn’t that speakers at the RNC called for jailing the opposing nominee.”
It’s no small detail. In the American tradition, partisans will blast rivals on every front, but voters are not accustomed to hearing calls for the incarceration of the other party’s presidential candidate.

We stand as the role model of bloodless transition for all the world.  It is beyond not normal.  Steve Schmidt, on MSNBC tonight, called it “Banana Republican” right after I remarked that I had never seen anything like this in this country.

No.  This is not normal.  It is not what we do. It is not how we act. It is not who we are.  We are better than this.
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Yesterday in Cincinnati, Hillary sat down with Charlie Rose.  A portion of the interview aired this morning on CBS.  The full interview aired on PBS this afternoon.  It may repeat at 11 EDT tonight.

Charlie tried to cajole her into giving him a running-mate scoop.  She stood firm.

Charlie tried also to wear her down on the “unpopular” meme, and she laughed charmingly, told him she got a lot of votes, thinks she’s pretty popular, and intends to be more popular.  We agree, Hillary!

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Hillary appeared with Senators Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken yesterday in Minneapolis.

At AFT Convention, Clinton Pledges to Work with Educators to Strengthen America’s Public Schools

At the AFT Convention in Minneapolis on Monday, Hillary Clinton reiterated her commitment to ensure every child receives a world-class education, regardless of their ZIP code. Clinton pledged to partner with teachers in the White House to repair our crumbling schools, invest in training and support for our educators, and provide every student in America the opportunity to learn computer science.

Clinton argued that Donald Trump is unfit to serve as president. Trump wants to “largely” eliminate the Department of Education, believes we invest too much in public education, and selected a running mate who slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students. As Clinton said, “Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello!  Hello, AFT!  My goodness, I was listening in the back and I heard Randi at the end of her remarks say, ‘And I’ve known her for 25 years.’ Wow, it’s been fun, hasn’t it?  Gone by fast.

Well, I’m thrilled to be here, and it is only fitting that AFT is celebrating your centennial right here in Minnesota, a state with a proud tradition of public service and great public education.I am thrilled that former Vice President Walter Mondale is here with us. He was one of my earliest inspirations, and I am always grateful for his life of service.  And I also want to say a word about Governor Wendell Anderson.  My thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends, and the countless people whose lives he touched.  Minnesota has a great tradition of electing terrific public servants. And I am so proud to be here with this state’s dynamic duo.  You got a preview, a taste of the combination that Amy and Al represent, but I can tell you that the two senators from Minnesota are among the greatest that Minnesota has ever sent to Washington, and among the greatest to have ever served in the United States Senate. And I just said exactly what they told me to say.  I’ve known Al a long time.  He handed me this slip of paper on the way in.  But no, I consider them both great friends and I am so excited about being able to work with them again starting next January 2017.And Randi, thank you for that introduction, but much more than that, thanks for standing up to injustice in all of its forms.  As Randi said earlier, these have been difficult days for our country and the world.  Just over a week ago, Philando Castile died in a police incident outside St. Paul.”\

AUDIENCE MEMBERS:  “Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.”

HILLARY CLINTON:  “And I just had the great honor – the great honor and the great privilege of meeting with his mother and meeting with two of his uncles and his sister.  And I had heard a lot about Phil, because that is what they call him.  And I share – I share the urgency and the commitment to actually address these issues.

But let me tell you, my friends, let me tell you, we cannot let this madness continue. A lot of people are still in pain right here, including his courageous family, his coworkers and students at the St. Paul public schools.  And to our AFT brothers and sisters in the Twin Cities who knew him as a fellow educator who cared deeply about this community and its children, his mother was telling me how he never wanted to miss a day of work.  He drove 30 miles from their home in Minneapolis to the school where he worked.  Nothing could stop him from being there.  And his death, his loss is ours as well.  Our country has been confronted – our country has been confronted with tragedy too many times recently, hasn’t it?  From St. Paul to Orlando, from Dallas to Baton Rouge, where we saw three police officers murdered yesterday in an apparent ambush.  This hate, this violence cannot stand.  Killing police officers is a crime against us all.  There can be no justification, no looking the other way, and this must end.  And it can. It can be true both that we need law enforcement and that we need to improve law enforcement to get back – to get back to the fundamental principle that everyone in every community benefits when there is respect for the law and everyone is respected by the law.

The service and sacrifice of your fellow public employees is crucial to keeping our communities safe, and these murders threaten the painful, essential work we have to do as a nation.  And for many of the people in this room, that work includes explaining these incidents to our children.  Something you’ve had to do more and more this past year.  So to every single AFT member, I say thank you.

Thank you for caring for all of our children no matter what they look like, where they come from, or who they are.

And thank you for being one of the essential partners in everything we’ve got to do to move our country in the right direction.  Thank you for fighting to reform our broken campaign finance system.  I will stand with you and propose a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. Thank you.  Thank you for fighting to defend and improve the Affordable Care Act – and I will work with you to keep pushing for universal health care coverage. Most of all, thank you for a century of fighting for fairness and opportunity – the teachers, paraprofessionals, school-related personnel, the nurses, and public service employees of AFT.

I know that you have some of the hardest, most important jobs in the world.  And I want to say right from the outset that I’m with you. When I am president, you will have a partner in the White House and you will always have a seat at the table. Because just like you, I get up every day and I ask, how can we do better for America’s kids?  I am committed to making sure every child in this country receives a world-class education with good schools and good teachers, no matter what ZIP code they live in. And I know that starts with supporting parents to be their child’s first teachers. And expanding access to high-quality childcare and universal preschool for every single child.

I know that means repairing our crumbling schools and investing in training and support for our educators, because when we invest in education, we invest in our country’s future.  And you know what?  We also then invest in a stronger economy.  Some of you may know that these issues aren’t new to me.  My first job out of law school was working for the Children’s Defense Fund.  I went door to door in New Bedford, Massachusetts, talking with families whose kids had disabilities that made it hard or impossible for them to go to school.  Our work helped convince Congress to guarantee access to education for all students.  And years later, when my husband was governor of Arkansas, he put me in charge of working to improve our schools, and we held hearings in every county and we came up with a plan, then we fought hard to raise standards and get schools more resources and to get teachers the raises they deserved, which was the highest increase of any state in the country at that time.

So, you see, along with my personal experience, I carry these lessons.  If we work together, we can give schools and educators the resources you need to succeed.  My plan to strengthen public education comes down to TLC: teaching, learning, and community.  America is asking more of our educators than ever before.  Some of you heard the impassioned plea from the police chief in Dallas when he said our society is asking so much more of our police to deal with so many problems.  Well, it’s true of our teachers and our educators as well.

We look to you to fill in gaps that we, as a country, have neglected, like helping low-income kids, English-language learners, kids with disabilities thrive.  And we ask you to help right wrongs, from poverty and homelessness to the legacy of racial inequities stretching back centuries.  We ask so much of you and we don’t give you enough in return. As president, I will launch a national campaign to modernize and elevate the profession of teaching.  I want all educators, at every stage of your careers, to know you’ll be able to keep learning, improving and innovating.  And we also need to be serious about raising wages for teachers and support staff.  Anyone who works full-time in America should be able to earn a living wage without taking second and third jobs just to get by.

And the last thing a teacher needs when you’re just starting out is a mountain of student debt.  When I’m president, future students won’t have to borrow a dime to attend public colleges or universities.  For families making less than $125,000 a year, we will eliminate tuition at public colleges and universities altogether. And for the millions who already have student debt, you will be able to refinance your student loans so you never have to pay more than you can afford.  And if you go into public service, which includes teaching, any remaining debt will be forgiven after 10 years.

Now, we need to make college more affordable, but we can’t cut costs at the expense of talented, committed educators at colleges across the country, including adjunct faculty members.  (Cheers and applause.)  They also deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, and to have a strong voice with a union. If we are serious about supporting educators, we need to support unions.  And I will fight back against attacks on working families in America, and I will defend your right to organize and bargain collectively, and we will not stand for attempts to privatize public services.

Now, here’s what I know.  I know these things can only be done with you in partnership.  So I’m asking you, asking educators across the country, to work with me; asking you to advise me and to hold me accountable; to keep advocating for your students, your profession, and your communities.  Because together, we are stronger, and we can produce results if we get up every single day, make up our minds we’re going to keep working to achieve the goals that I have set out.

The second piece of TLC is learning.  We need to educate our children for the future, not the past.  We want our children to be creators, innovators, entrepreneurs, critical thinkers who can collaborate and communicate within their communities and around the world.  That means we need to be reaching together for new heights, not rehashing old arguments.  It’s time to stop focusing only on, quote, ‘failing schools.’  Let’s focus on all of our great schools too.  When schools get it right, let’s replicate their practices across America. There’s a lot we can learn from each other, and I intend to make sure that we have the best research, the best evidence, no matter where it comes from – that you then can put to work on behalf of your students.

So yes, we are going to do everything possible to work with schools across America.  I’ve been in a lot of those schools.  I used to have what I called the Chelsea test. Now I’ve got the Charlotte test. And that test is pretty simple.  Would I want my daughter, and now my granddaughter, and soon my grandson, to go to school here? I’ll tell you what.  I have walked into a lot of schools where I said, boy, would I be happy – would I be happy to have the most important child in the world to me attend here.  But I’ve also walked into schools where literally the building is falling down, where you can see the holes in the ceiling, where you can see the mold, where you walk into a library and there’s not a single book and there certainly is not a computer.  We can’t tolerate that.  We can’t let any one of America’s precious children – I don’t care who they are – attend a school that shows we don’t care about them.

And that’s why we are not going to go in the direction of letting people on the outside foist for-profit schools on our kids.  We are going to continue to oppose vouchers that drain resources from public schools and undermine their ability to provide the education our children deserve. Where there are public charter schools, we will learn from them.  But what we’re interested in is making sure that every child in our country has the chance to attend a great public school. And I believe part of that rests on working together to find the right balance on testing.

Now, look, you know; you’re the experts.  Tests can provide critical information to teachers and parents to find out how kids are doing, how schools are doing to help them improve.  But when you are forced to teach to a test, our children miss out on some of the most valuable experiences they can gain in a classroom during their school years. I personally have no time for these so-called education wars.  It’s time for those of us who believe in public education to sit at one table, around it together, and listen to you – the teachers and support paraprofessionals who actually are with our kids all day long.

And let’s start making decisions about what’s best for our kids not in accordance with some entrenched ideology.  Consider this:  Right now, there are more than half a million open jobs that require computing skills across the country, in every major industry.  But you know the majority of our schools don’t offer computer science.  That’s partly because there’s a shortage of computer science teachers, it’s partly because our educators don’t have the time or resources to learn how to integrate digital tools into their curriculum.  And we can do something about that.  And on top of it, more than 70 percent of teachers assign homework that requires broadband access, but more than 5 million children don’t have it.  We’re just taking this digital divide and making it a huge problem in the lives of 5 million kids.  And we can do something about that.

As president, I will be your partner to take on these challenges.  We’re going to make sure every child in America has the opportunity to learn computer science.  We’re going to work to close the homework gap by making every student has broadband access that they can use to do their homework. So let’s use all the tools at our disposal, including technology, to give kids an education that will meet the skills needed for the jobs we’re producing.

And finally, there’s C in TLC, community.  So much of what happens inside your classroom is determined by what happens outside.  Too many of our public school students are living in poverty.  For the first time ever, it’s a majority.  51 percent.  That’s on all of us.  But you see students coming to school hungry or exhausted from a long night in a shelter.  So many kids have the weight of the world on their little shoulders.  And we need to tackle all the problems holding our kids back.  And we need to do it together.

I’ve had so many meetings and conversations with teachers, it just breaks my heart, as they tell me about kids who come to school in the dead of winter, no coat on their back.  Come to school unable to even look in their teacher’s face because of what just happened at home or on the way to school.  Go home from school dodging gangs trying to recruit them.  That’s a stain on all of us.  Let’s create more community schools.  More partnerships between schools, social services, and nonprofit organizations.  Let’s pledge that we’re going to give children who need it the mental health services that they deserve.

And you should not have to be from a wealthy family to join a soccer team or have access to extracurricular activities that can develop your confidence and your feeling that you are an important person in the world in the eyes of those who are looking at you.  So we’re going to have to work together.  There is no choice.  From the community level all the way to the White House.  That’s just one of the many reasons why this election is it so important.  I’ll tell you what.  If I weren’t running against him, I would ask Randy to invite me here so I could rail against him.

Because it’s no surprise, my friends, that Donald Trump has a very different take on all of this.  He has said that America spends too much on education.  This is coming from someone who wants to give millionaires a free trillion dollar tax cut over the next decade. At least.  I’d like to hear him explain that to parents in Detroit, where students are trying to learn in crumbling, rodent infested classrooms.  He wants to, and I quote, ‘largely eliminate the Department of Education.’  But he says maybe he’ll leave some tentacles out there, whatever that means.

Now look, that agency may not always get it right, but it provides support for vital programs, from pre-K to Pell grants, and crucial resources to help low income students, students with disabilities, and English-language learners.  So Donald Trump would leave our most vulnerable students to fend for themselves.  If you want to know what kind of president Donald Trump will be, just look at who he’s chosen as his running mate. A Tea Party politician who has worked to undermine the rights of women, workers, LGBT Americans, and immigrants.

Mike Pence is one of the most extreme vice presidential picks in a generation.  And he’s one of the most hostile politicians in America when it comes to public education.  As governor of Indiana, he cut millions from higher education while he was giving huge tax cuts to corporations.  He turned away millions of federal dollars that could have expanded access to preschool for low income children, and slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students.  Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education.

And one more thing.  Parents and educators across America are already worried about what they’re calling the Trump effect, with bullying and harassment on the rise in our schools.  Last week, a mother in Wisconsin wrote me a letter saying that her adopted son had turned to her and said, if Trump becomes president, he’s going to make me go back to Ethiopia.  That’s the kind of fear Donald Trump is creating in the heart of a 10 year old boy.  What do our children think when he calls women pigs, or mocks a reporter with a disability?  Or when he talks about banning one and a half billion Muslims from entering our country?  What do our kids take away from his racist attack against a federal judge, or when he encourages his supporters to punch protesters in the face?  You wouldn’t tolerate that kind of behavior in your home or in your classroom.  How can we stand for it from someone running to be president of the United States?

Well, we know America’s a bighearted, fair-minded country, and that with your help, we’re going to continue to stress to our kids this is one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.  Not just for people who look a certain way, or worship a certain way.  We’re stronger when every child has the chance to live up to his or her full potential.  And public education gives our kids that chance.  So that’s why I’m counting on you. I’m counting on the AFT.  I’m counting on the American public to make sure as many people as possible get registered to vote, get educated, and get mobilized.

Today I announced a nationwide effort by my campaign to get more than 3 million Americans to register and commit to vote in November.  We would love your help. Please go to Hillaryclinton.com/vote to get involved.  And then let’s keep going.  Let’s keep making our case, working for better schools, more resources, more support, to give all of our kids the chance that they deserve.  With your help, we’re going to make sure we get to work on that agenda together, because we’re going to make sure we don’t turn our country over to Donald Trump.  Let’s go win in November.  Thank you all very, very much.”

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At the Republican Convention this afternoon, the Stop Trump movement was prevented from accomplishing its mission.  There is one way – the only way – to stop him, and that is to cast your ballot against him.  Hillary is circulating a letter to Donald explaining why we oppose him.  If you have not signed already, maybe you would like to.

 

Before you become the 28th person to be the Republican nominee for president, there’s something we want you to know:

You do not represent us. Your ideas don’t represent us. Your values don’t represent us.

And we are going to do absolutely everything we can to make sure you never, ever become president.

We believe in our country’s founding principle: that all people are created equal. That no matter the color of our skin, the faith we practice, how much money we have, or who we love, we all deserve a chance at happiness. We all deserve to be treated with dignity.

You’ve spent your life looking out for yourself. When one of your businesses fails, you declare bankruptcy and pass the cost onto workers and small businesses. You say you’ll make America great again while manufacturing shirts in China and ties in Bangladesh, but who cares as long as you can fit that slogan of yours on a hat?

You bulldozed your way into this nomination by sowing anger, hate, and fear. Now you’re counting on Americans to be cruel and narrow-minded, because that’s what you are. But it’s not who we are.

That’s why you’ll always underestimate us, and it’s why you’ll never beat us. You fundamentally don’t understand what makes America great: We’re at our best when we stand up for each other.

Our country faces deep problems, from systemic racism and economic inequality to the overwhelming threat of climate change — and we won’t solve them by turning against each other. We’re going to work toward solutions that help all Americans, because we know that when people of all genders, races, and religions can succeed, we’re all better off.

Put another way, we’re stronger together. And when a bully comes after the people we love, we fight back. 

So that’s exactly what we’re going to do. We’re going to enfranchise and empower as many Americans as possible, and on November 8th, you’ll hear our message loud and clear:

We’re better than this.

In this country, we stand for what’s right. We stand for tolerance and understanding, for love and kindness, for empathy and equality.

That means we stand against you.

Our names are listed below. Read and remember them — we’re the people who are going to beat you this November.

Now you know exactly why.

Go here to sign >>>>

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At the 107th Annual NAACP Convention at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati., Hillary Clinton spoke of recent shootings of civilians, assaults on police, and systemic racism.

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At NAACP Convention, Hillary Clinton Condemns Recent Shootings of Police; Reiterates Call to Work Together for Needed Reforms

At the NAACP National Convention in Cincinnati on Monday, Hillary Clinton forcefully condemned the recent police shootings, including the killing of officers Brad Garafola, Matthew Gerald, and Montrell Jackson in Baton Rouge. Clinton reiterated the pressing need to support our law enforcement officers, reform our criminal justice system, and pass common sense gun laws to keep our communities and police officers safe.  As Clinton said, “So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. [….] We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.”

In addition, Clinton announced a nationwide voter mobilization goal to register and commit to vote more than 3 million voters to be a part of this campaign. In the kickoff week alone, Hillary for America and the state Democratic coordinated campaigns will host more than 500 registration or commit to vote events across the country.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello, NAACP! It is so good to be here with all of you.

I want to start by thanking my longtime friend and colleague, my collaborator, and partner, and so many important causes; Hazel Dukes is a treasure. A treasure not only for New York, but for the NAACP and for our country. Thank you so much dear Hazel.

I want to thank your Chair, Rosyln Brock. Thank you so much Madame Chair. Your President and CEO Cornell Brooks, and everyone here today, including all the elected officials who have already appeared before you and those who will be addressing you during this convention.

And I have to start by saying we all know about that other Convention happening up in Cleveland today. Well, my opponent in this race may have a different view, but there’s nowhere I’d rather be than right here with all of you.

For more than a century, you’ve been on the frontlines, pushing America to become a better, fairer country. You and your noble predecessors have marched, sat in, stood up and spoke out – all to bring us closer to our founding ideals of equality for all.

And yes we have made progress, we see the results: in classrooms where children of all races learn side by side; in boardrooms and break rooms, where workers of all backgrounds are able to earn a living and support their families; at every level of government, where more and more the people we elect to represent America actually look like America.

And, of course, in the White House, with our wonderful President and First Lady and their daughters, Barack and Michelle Obama.

So as the President has said, and indeed, as he exemplified, we’ve come a long way.  But you know – and I know – that we have so much further to go.

We were cruelly reminded of that with the tragic deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, two more black men killed by police incidents, this time in Louisiana and Minnesota. And then in Dallas, five police officers killed while serving and protecting peaceful protestors, targeted because they were police.

And we saw it again just yesterday, when three police officers were shot in an apparent ambush in Baton Rouge. This madness has to stop.

Watching the news from Baton Rouge yesterday, my heart broke not just for those officers and their grieving families, but for all of us.  Because we have difficult, painful, important work ahead of us to repair the bonds between police and communities, and between and among each other.  We need one another to do this work.  And we need leaders like the NAACP. We need police officers to help us do this work.  These murders threaten all of that.

Killing police officers is a terrible crime.  That’s why our laws treat the murders of police so seriously because they represent the rule of law itself. If you take aim at that, you take aim at all of us. Anyone who does it and anyone who helps must be held accountable.  And as president, I will bring the full weight of the law to bear in making sure that those who kill a police officer are brought to justice.  There can be no justification.  No looking the other way.  We all have to make sure and pray it ends.

The officers killed yesterday in Baton Rouge were named Montrell Jackson, Matthew Gerald, Brad Garafola.  When they died, they were responding to a call about a man with a gun.  How many families, how many more families, would pay the price if we didn’t have brave men and women answering those calls?  That’s why I’m haunted by the images of what the officers were doing in Dallas when they died.  Protecting a peaceful march, talking with the protestors. Where would our democracy be without courageous people willing to do that?

So we all need to be partners in making law enforcement as secure and effective as it needs to be. That means investing in our police – in training on the proper use of force, especially lethal force. How to avoid using force to resolve incidents.

Officer safety and wellness – everything they need to do their jobs right and rebuild trust with their communities.  I’ve said from the beginning of my campaign, that will be my priority as President.

Perhaps the best way to honor our police is to follow the lead of police departments across the country striving to do better.  The deaths of Alton and Philando drove home how urgently we need to make reforms to policing and criminal justice — how we cannot rest until we root out implicit bias and stop the killings of African Americans.

Because there is, as you know so well, another hard truth at the heart of this complex matter. Many African Americans fear the police. I can hear you, some of you in this room. And today there are people all across America sick over what happened in Baton Rouge and in Dallas. But also fearful that the murders of police officers mean that vital questions about police-community relations will go unanswered.

Now that is a reasonable fear isn’t it? All of this tells us very powerfully that something needs to change. Many police officers across the country agree with that. There’s a real opportunity here for cooperation.

But that can only happen if we can build trust and accountability. And let’s admit it. That gets harder every time someone else is killed.

So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. I know that the NAACP, and so many of you individually, will do all you can to help our nation heal and start the work together to meet these challenges.

We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.

And let’s admit it, there is clear evidence that African-Americans are disproportionately killed in police incidents than any other group.  And African-American men are far more likely to be stopped and searched by police, charged with crimes, and sentenced to longer prison terms than white men convicted of the same offenses.  These facts tell us something is profoundly wrong. We can’t ignore that. We can’t wish it away. We have to make it right.

That means end-to-end reform in our criminal justice system – not half-measures, but a full commitment with real follow through. That’s why the very first speech I gave in this campaign, back in April of 2015 was about criminal justice reform. And the next President should make a commitment to fight for the reforms we so desperately need. Holding police departments like Ferguson accountable. Requiring accurate data on in-custody deaths, like Sandra Bland. Creating clear, national guidelines on the use of force, especially legal force. Supporting independent investigations of fateful encounters with the police. So I pledge to you, I will start taking action on day one and every day after that until we get this done.

And you know what? When the 24-hour news cycle moves on, I won’t. This is too important. This goes to the heart of who we are. This is about our character as Americans. That’s why we also need to fix the crisis of mass incarceration. Eliminate the disparity in sentencing between crack and powder cocaine. Dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline that starts in school and diverts too many African American kids out of school and into the criminal justice system, instead of giving them the education they deserve to have. And we need to do, all of us need to do – and I look forward to working with the NAACP – we need to do a much better job of helping people who’ve paid their debt to society find jobs and support when they get out.

America is well known, and we want to be a land of second chances – but so many Americans never had a first chance to begin with.  So let’s give everyone a fair chance at rebuilding their lives.  As Abraham Lincoln said, ‘Give everyone a fair chance in the race of life.’ My plan would make significant investments in reentry programs for the formerly incarcerated.  And I will ‘Ban the box’ in the federal government. People deserve a real shot at an interview instead of being told ‘No,’ right out of the gate.

Then beyond criminal justice, we must, we must fight for commonsense reforms to stop gun violence. This is by far, gun violence, by far the leading cause of death for young African-American men, outstripping the next nine causes of death combined.  The wrong people, the wrong people keep getting their hands on guns.  And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind the Dallas shooter had, which allowed him to outgun the police.

That’s why the Cleveland police, yesterday, demanded that the state suspend open carry of guns on the streets during the Republican National Convention.  And last week, the extraordinary and inspiring Dallas police chief, Chief Brown, told lawmakers, ‘Do your job. We’re doing ours,’ he said.  He’s right.  When he went on to say we’re putting our lives on the line. We’ve got to do better.

People who should care about protecting of police officers should be committed to getting assault weapons off the streets to start with.  And they should join us in instituting comprehensive background checks because law enforcement officers are nearly 50 percent, nearly 50 percent, less likely to be killed in states where there are checks on the purchase of handguns.

But even if we succeed in passing these laws and implementing them, we’ve got to go even further than that.

We need to do something about the racial inequities in our healthcare system.  Right now, black kids are 500 percent more likely to die from asthma than white kids – 500 percent! Right now a black baby in South Carolina is twice as likely to die before her first birthday as a white baby.  Imagine if those numbers were reversed, and it were white kids dying.  Imagine the outcry and the resources that would flood in.

And let’s do everything we can to create more jobs in places where unemployment remains stubbornly high after generations of underinvestment and neglect.  I’m a big fan of Congressman Jim Clyburn’s ‘10-20-30’ plan – steering 10 percent of federal investment to neighborhoods where 20 percent of the population has been living below the poverty line for 30 years.

That should go nationwide because the unemployment rate among young African Americans is twice as high as for young white people. And because of that, my plan also includes $20 billion aimed specifically at creating jobs for young people. If you don’t get that first job, it’s hard to get the second job, and it’s hard to build that solid financial base.

And because of the Great Recession, the median wealth for black families is now just a tiny fraction of the median wealth for white families.  That’s why my plan includes steps to help more African-American families buy a home, which has always been one of the surest ways to build wealth and security for a family.

We will do more to support black entrepreneurs get access to capital. And I want to give a shout out to black women, who represent the fastest-growing segment of women-owned businesses in America.

I want to unleash all of that energy and all of that talent. We need to view all of these issues also as part of the struggle for civil rights. Rosa Parks opened up every seat on the bus: our challenge now is to expand jobs so that everyone can afford the fare.  And let’s ensure that the bus route reaches every neighborhood, and connects every family with safe, affordable housing, good jobs, and quality schools.

Now, I know none of this will surprise those of you who know me. I’ve got a lot of plans. You can go to my website, Hillary-Clinton-dot-com and read our full agenda.

Because you see, I have this old-fashioned idea: if you’re running for President, you should say exactly what you want to do and how you will get it done.  I do sweat the specifics because I think they matter.  Whether one more kid gets health care, one more person finds a job, or one more woman entrepreneur gets access to capital to follow her dream – those just may be details in Washington, but it really matters to those people and their families.

And the truth is, we need to plan because we face a complex set of economic, social and political challenges: they’re intersectional; they’re reinforcing.  We’ve got to take them all on. We can’t wait and just do one at a time.

But the answers won’t just come from Washington.  Ending systemic racism requires contributions from all of us – especially, especially those of us who haven’t experienced it ourselves.

I’ve been saying this for a while now – and I’m going to keep saying it, because I think it’s important.  We white Americans need to do a better job of listening when African Americans talk about the seen and unseen barriers you face every day.

We need to recognize our privilege and practice humility, rather than assume that our experiences are everyone’s experiences.

We all need to try, as best we can, to walk in one another’s shoes – to imagine what it would be like to sit our son or daughter down and have ‘the talk’ about how carefully they need to act around police because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or even killed.

Let’s also put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to do a dangerous job that their families pray will bring them home safe at night. Empathy works both ways.  We’ve got to try to see the world through their eyes, too.

When you get right down to it, that’s what makes it possible for people from every background, every race, every religion, to come together as one nation.  It’s what makes our country endure.

And in times like these we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.  I will work every single day to do just that. And what I’m about to say, I say with no satisfaction, the Republican nominee for President will do the exact opposite.

He might say otherwise if he were here.  But of course, he declined your invitation.

So all we can go on is what he has said and done in the past.

Donald Trump led the movement to de-legitimize our first black president, trumpeting the so-called ‘birther’ movement.

Donald Trump plays coy with white supremacists.  Donald insults Mexican immigrants, even an American judge born of Mexican heritage.  Donald Trump demeans women.  Donald Trump wants to ban an entire religion from entering our country.

And Donald Trump loves to talk to the press.  But let’s not forget, let us not forget: the first time Donald Trump was quoted in The New York Times was in 1973, when the Justice Department went after his company for refusing to rent apartments to African Americans.

It was one of the largest federal cases of its kind at the time. And when federal investigators spoke with Trump’s employees, they said they were instructed to mark rental applications from black people with a ‘C.’ A ‘C’ for colored.

By now, we’ve heard a lot of troubling things about Donald Trump but that one’s shocking.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln.  And we are watching it become the Party of Trump.  And that’s not just a huge loss to our democracy – it is a threat to our democracy.

And it all adds up, it all adds up to an undeniable conclusion:  I don’t care if you’re a Democrat, a Republican, an Independent — Donald Trump cannot become President of the United States.

And that’s why we’ve got to work together to get out the vote this fall.

You know that better than anyone.  That’s why the theme of this conference is ‘Our Lives Matter, Our Votes Count.’

I agree with both of that. And now I think your votes count more than ever.

That’s why we’ve got to stand up against any attempt to roll back the clock on voting rights.  Encourage everyone, everyone we know to stand up and be counted in this November election.

As Dr. King said, ‘Our lives begin to end when we become silent about things that matter.’  None of us, none of us, can afford to be silent with so much at stake.

That’s why, here today, I am pleased to announce a nationwide drive to get 3 million people to register to vote and to commit to vote in this election.

We are hosting more than 500 registration events this week, across the country. We’re going to minor league baseball games, college campuses, barbershops, hair salons, street corners. And with those we cannot connect with in person, we’ve created an online, one stop shop registration tool, in English and in Spanish.

And my team in Ohio wanted me to make sure you all know that we’re hiring.  We actually have a recruiter here today – he’s got a table set up in the hall.  We’re hiring paid organizers to help us get out the vote and get our message out all across Ohio. So please spread the word – we want great people on our team.  That’s the way we’re going to be successful. We’re not the red team or the blue team, we’re the American team, and it’s time we start acting like it.

I have no doubt we can rise to meet these challenges if we stand together– no doubt at all. And if we are looking for inspiration, let’s go to one of the officers killed yesterday. 10 days ago, Montrell Jackson, a young African American police officer in Baton Rouge, posted a message on Facebook, he wrote so honestly and powerfully about the struggle of being black and wearing blue in today’s America.

‘I’m tired,’ he wrote, ‘in uniform I get nasty, hateful looks, and out of uniform, they consider me a threat.’ He went on, ‘These are trying times, please don’t let hate infect your heart. I’m working in these streets, so any protesters, officers, friends, families, or whoever, if you see me,’ Montrell said, ‘and need a hug, or want to say a prayer, I’ve got you.’

That, my friends, is the strength of America. Men like Montrell Jackson. Despite all our challenges, that spirit of love and community must guide us still. We have to heal the divides that remain, make the United States what it should be, stronger and fairer. More opportunity for every one of our people. I would not be standing here on the brink of accepting the Democratic nomination if I did not believe, if I did not in my heart believe, that America’s best years are still ahead of us. So let us go forward with faith, with confidence, with optimism. Our children and our grandchildren deserve no less.

Thank you, God bless you and God bless the United States of America.”

 

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Buzzfeed, not yet 10 years old, is on Donald Trump’s blacklistThe New Yorker, 91 years old, is not … yet, but Trump has dubbed it “a failing magazine that no one reads.”  Since it commenced endorsing presidential candidates as late as 2004 and all of those endorsements have gone to Democrats, it was probably already dancing on the edge of the wrath of the Donald.  Both publications have put forth mea culpas from former Trump acquaintances who felt the need to say something before the country embarks on a path to disaster.

McKay Coppins in Buzzfeed recounts that during the Detroit debate moderated by Fox News:

About 30 minutes into the debate, Kelly asked Trump to respond to a recent BuzzFeed News report about his position on immigration.

“First of all, BuzzFeed?” Trump said, waving an index finger in the air. “They were the ones that said under no circumstances will I run for president — and were they wrong.” My phone lit up with a frenzied flurry of tweets, texts, and emails, each one carrying variations of the same message: This is all your fault.

His fault!  Because of an unflattering article he wrote two years earlier that he and apparently others felt goaded Trump into making this run for the roses.

Tony Schwartz, whose name appears as co-author of The Art of the Deal and who shared in the profits, could no longer hold his silence on the fraud he helped perpetrate.  He told New Yorker reporter Jane Mayer:

“I put lipstick on a pig,” he said. “I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.” He went on, “I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”

If he were writing “The Art of the Deal” today, Schwartz said, it would be a very different book with a very different title. Asked what he would call it, he answered, “The Sociopath.”

The two articles dovetail on the day when the Republicans open their national “dispersion.”  A convention convenes members – brings them together.  This one is driving them away and apart.  “Convention” is oxymoronic and the event requires a different sobriquet.  Dispersion is the best I can come up with and fills a second bill since now begins the dispersion of the Trump image and message to the grand majority who have not followed the campaigns up until this point.

Both of these articles are must-reads.  They are on the long side and complex. But from his short-tempered testiness to his short attention span, from his mythomania to his self-serving mutability – it’s all there in these articles.

Much of this will come as no surprise to Democrats, especially those who have been on board the Hillary bus from the beginning. The shallowness of character and purpose coupled with the profound level of underlying hostility – a clear and present danger –  at once shock and galvanize the reader to do everything possible to prevent Schwartz’s prediction from being realized.

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