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Hillary Clinton Statement on Apparent Terrorist Attacks

After yesterday’s attacks in Minnesota, New Jersey and New York, Hillary Clinton released the following statement:

“I strongly condemn the apparent terrorist attacks in Minnesota, New Jersey, and New York. I pray for all of those who were wounded, and for their families. Once again, we saw the bravery of our first responders who run toward danger to help others. Their quick actions saved lives. Law enforcement officials are working to identify who was behind the attacks in New York and New Jersey and we should give them the support they need to finish the job and bring those responsible to justice – we will not rest until that happens. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack in Minnesota, and this should steel our resolve to protect our country and defeat ISIS and other terrorist groups. I have laid out a comprehensive plan to do that. This includes launching an intelligence surge to help identify and thwart attacks before they can be carried out, and to spot lone wolf attackers. We also need to work with Silicon Valley to counter propaganda and recruitment efforts online. Americans have faced threats before, and our resilience in the face of them only makes us stronger. I am confident we will once again choose resolve over fear.”

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After landing in White Plains from D.C. tonight, Hillary spoke to her traveling press about the explosions in New Jersey and New York.

Here are some tweets from Dan Merica who was on board.

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As the first woman to win a major party’s presidential nomination, Hillary received the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Trailblazer Award tonight. The 46th Annual Legislative Conference (ALC) Phoenix Awards Dinner was held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.  President Obama delivered his seventh and final address as POTUS.

Congratulations, Hillary!  You always make us so proud!

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At the Congressional Black Caucus Dinner, Clinton Calls on America to Choose Progress Over Prejudice

At the Congressional Black Caucus Phoenix Awards Dinner in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Hillary Clinton asked all Americans to choose a path of unity and progress over the prejudice and paranoia of Donald Trump. Clinton again called out Trump for his leadership of the birther movement aiming to delegitimize our first black president.

Dedicating her award to those who broke down barriers before her, and to the next generation of Americans fighting to allow every child to achieve her God-given potential, Clinton said this election is about “who will fight for the forgotten, who will invest in our children, and who will really have your back in the White House. We need ideas, not insults, real plans to help struggling Americans in communities that have been left out and left behind, not prejudice and paranoia.”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello. It’s so great to be back here with all of you tonight. I want to thank my friend, Congressman Jim Clyburn; Don Peebles; Representative Butterfield; members of the Congressional Black Caucus; and congratulate all of the honorees. On a personal note, I want to recognize a dear friend who is retiring after 46 years, Congressman Charles Rangel. He is one of a kind, and we are grateful for your years of service.

And what can I say about one of the best Presidents this country has ever had, Barack Obama? All through this campaign, I have made the point over and over again, President Obama saved our country from a second Great Depression. He brought Osama bin Laden to justice. And so much more. I, for one, don’t think he gets the credit he deserves for doing what he’s done on behalf of our country and the world. And it’s not just the President he’s been, but the man he is. Even when hateful nonsense is thrown their way, Barack, Michelle, their two beautiful daughters, have represented our country with class, grace, and integrity. As Michelle says, ‘When others go low, we go high.’ I know I speak for not just everyone in this room but so many tens of millions of Americans: Mr. President, not only do we know you are an American, you’re a great American! And you make us all proud to be Americans, too. Let me thank the leadership of the CBC Foundation for this great honor, and to thank all of my friends in the Congressional Black Caucus for it as well. I dedicate it to all the trailblazers who came before me who blazed trails that I could follow in their footsteps – Barbara Jordan. Shirley Chisholm. I would not be standing here without them. Generations of women and men who struggled and sacrificed and cleared a path for all of us.

This award is also for everyone out there helping to break down the barriers holding Americans back, to leaders like all of you, and to a rising generation of young activists. To all those on the front lines dedicated to the proposition that in America, every single child deserves the chance to fulfill his or her God-given potential. This has been the cause of my life ever since I went to work for the Children’s Defense Fund all those years ago. And I’m going to close my campaign the way I began my career and the way that I will serve as your president, focused on opportunities for our children and fairness for our families.

We have so much work to do together. I’ve heard many heartbreaking stories over this campaign. One was from Tianna Gaines-Turner, a working mother to three children from Northeast Philadelphia. She testified at the DNC platform meeting in June and told us how her husband had been laid off and she worked in a part-time job. She said she’d been hungry more times than she could count, and that life felt like a maze, because she faced barriers no matter which way she turned. But despite all of this, Tianna has hope. She still believes that her 8-year-old daughter will be president one day. And she believes that this election can make all the difference in the world to her and her family. Let’s prove her right.

As a country, we have a moral obligation to give her family and every family a chance to rise up and reach their dreams. That is what’s at stake in this election. It’s not about golf course promotions or birth certificate. It comes down to who will fight for the forgotten, who will invest in our children, and who will really have your back in the White House.

We need ideas, not insults, real plans to help struggling Americans in communities that have been left out and left behind, not prejudice and paranoia. We can’t let Barack Obama’s legacy fall into the hands of someone who doesn’t understand that, whose dangerous and divisive vision for our country will drag us backwards. Instead, we need to come together, to get incomes rising with a higher minimum wage, to invest in neglected communities with efforts like Jim Clyburn’s 10-20-30 plan, to get guns out of the hands of dangerous people, to fight for a criminal justice system that actually delivers justice, and to make sure that all kids have good schools and good teachers no matter what zip codes they live in.

When you really think about it, the choice this November is about so much more than Democrats and Republicans. As Michelle Obama said at the Democratic convention, it’s about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four years of their lives. It’s also about the kind of country we want to be, what we want to leave behind for future generations. I thank everyone here, who has been fighting for this vision over so many years. I thank all who have supported me. I want you to know I’m not taking your vote or anyone’s vote for granted. I’m working every single day to earn your support. And I need your help over the next 52 days to bring our campaign across the finish line together.

Barbara Jordan famously said that a government is invigorated when each of us is willing to participate in shaping the future of this nation. So to everyone here tonight, please, keep doing what you’re doing, but also help to register voters. Tell others about the clear choice in this election. In some states, early voting is nearly here, so we need to keep the pressure on. Let’s send a loud and clear message once and for all: We are stronger together. And no matter what, remember this: Love trumps hate. Thank you all very much!”

STAND

Let’s get a few things straight. First of all, Hillary has promised to protect the Second Amendment and has never so much as hinted that she had any intention of abolishing it.  Second, even if she had said anything like that the proper response is to encourage supporters to vote against her. To imply in any way that your political opponent should be harmed is outrageous and could not be more alien and unAmerican.  How much more of Trump’s outrageous rhetoric must we tolerate?  This goes beyond hate speech.  It is a threat.  It has no place in our electoral politics.

At a rally last night, Donald Trump hinted at Hillary Clinton’s assassination.

“I think her bodyguards should drop all weapons,” he said. “They should disarm immediately. Take their guns away, let’s see what happens to her.”

So far, the reaction has been pretty subdued — like we should just expect this from Trump.

Look, I get that it was Friday night.

But if Trump says something like this and we don’t react, we allow his brand of racist, authoritarian, corrupt politics to become somehow normal.

And we have to be better than that.

So here’s what I propose: Let’s use this moment to show that we’re standing with Hillary — and that we could not be more committed to beating Donald Trump on Election Day, at the ballot box.

Do something right now — donate.

Thank you,

Christina

Christina Reynolds
Deputy Communications Director
Hillary for America


Statement from Robby Mook On Trump’s Comments About Possible Violence Against Hillary Clinton

Robby Mook, campaign manager for Hillary for America, released the following statement Friday evening in response to Donald Trump’s comments referencing possible acts of violence against Hillary Clinton:

“Donald Trump, the Republican nominee for President, has a pattern of inciting people to violence. Whether this is done to provoke protesters at a rally or casually or even as a joke, it is an unacceptable quality in anyone seeking the job of Commander in Chief. This kind of talk should be out of bounds for a presidential candidate, just like it should be out of bounds for a presidential candidate to peddle a conspiracy theory about the President of the United States for five years. But we’ve seen again and again that no amount of failed resets can change who Donald Trump is.  He is unfit to be President and it is time Republican leaders stand up to denounce this disturbing behavior in their nominee.”

Please stand with Hillary!

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STAND

Birtherism is to Trump’s political rise what his loan from his father is to his business success. It is what made him. He can never deny it.

As his starter loan from good-old-dad was not his money, birther theory was not Donald Trump’s brain child.  He didn’t start the fire.  Those who were there at the creation will remember names of the motley crew of pioneers like Philip Berg, Mario Apuzzo, Charles Kerchner, Leo Donofrio, Jerome Corsi, Orly Taitz, and Reverend James Manning who developed the ready-made-for-Trump scenario.  WorldNetDaily regularly featured their myriad quests for the grail which was, variously, the birth certificate or some kind of court decision depending on the player.  Birtherism had a history and roots in “investigative” junkets and dead-end lawsuits long before Donald Trump co-opted the movement and made it his central campaign issue.

Today, Donald Trump tried to take a page from the great Gilda Radner’s character Emily Litella and say “Never mind!”  “You know all that crap I said about Barack Obama’s BC and transcripts?  Never mind!”  It was pretty pathetic.

What will it take to wake up the media to put the screws to Donald Trump?  This is not a normal election, and he is not a normal candidate.  This birther announcement today was yet another Trump distraction where he played the press.  They gathered like iron filings to a magnet today at his new D.C. hotel for what had been billed as a major press event, an event that consisted of a grand opening¹, much misplaced praise for The Donald, and one sentence supposedly intended to allay all doubts about where the sitting president was born.  The gall!

¹Grand opening of his own hotel! Guess who profited from this event, billed as a campaign event, being booked at a Trump hotel.  Yes, indeed. Trump invoiced his own campaign for the reservation and personally profited.

Hillary, of course, had a reaction which she voiced in her remarks at the Black Women’s Agenda Symposium.

Just yesterday, Trump again refused to say with his own words that the president was born in the United States. Donald’s advisors had the temerity to say, ‘He’s doing the country a ‘service’ by pushing these lies.’  No, he isn’t. He’s feeding into the worst impulses – the bigotry and bias – that lurks in our country.

Barack Obama was born in America, plain and simple.  And Donald Trump owes him and the American people an apology. So, my friends, there is no ‘new’ Donald Trump. There never will be. Donald Trump looks at President Obama after eight years as our president. He still doesn’t see him as an American.

Think of how dangerous that is. Imagine a person in the Oval Office who traffics in conspiracy theories and refuses to let them go – no matter what the facts are. Imagine someone who distorts the truth to fit a very narrow view of the world. Imagine a president who sees someone who doesn’t look like him, and doesn’t agree with him, and thinks, ‘That person must not be a real American.’

Donald Trump is unfit to be President of the United States. We cannot become insensitive to what he says and what he stirs up. We can’t just accept this.We’ve got to stand up to it. If we don’t, it won’t stop.

Further:

Trump has spent years peddling a racist conspiracy aimed at undermining the first African American president. He can’t just take it back.

The birther lie is what turned Trump from an ordinary reality TV star into a political figure. That origin story can’t be unwritten.

Hillary for America issued a statement.

HFA Statement on Donald Trump’s Press Event

After Donald Trump’s press event today, Hillary for America Campaign Manager Robby Mook released the following statement:

“Trump’s actions today were disgraceful. After five years of pushing a racist conspiracy theory into the mainstream, it was ap the palling to watch Trump appoint himself the judge of whether the President of the United States is American. This sickening display shows more than ever why Donald Trump is totally unfit be president.”

Trump’s real agenda today was to divert attention from the empty page that is his arsenal of qualifications starting with his tax returns and any assurance that he will build a wall between himself and his for-profit organization with a complex network of foreign ties should he be elected.  Let’s be clear: he should not be.  This was no come-to-Jesus moment today.  We can hope it, finally, humiliated the press into shattering his charade.

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Thank you to all the generous donors!  You are really coming through for Hillary, and it’s great!

STAND

 

 

Hillary spoke this morning at the Black Women’s Agenda 39th Annual Symposium at the Renaissance Washington, DC Downtown Hotel.

At the Black Women’s Agenda Symposium, Clinton Calls Out Trump for His Bigotry and Vows to Protect the Rights of All Americans

At the Black Women’s Agenda Symposium in Washington, D.C. on Friday, Hillary Clinton called on Donald Trump to apologize for leading the birther movement, the racist lie that President Obama is not a natural born American citizen. While Trump tries to move on from this outrageous episode, Clinton said it is more important than ever to remember Maya Angelou’s adage, “And we know who Donald is. For five years, he has led the birther movement to de-legitimize our first black president. His campaign was founded on this outrageous lie. There is no erasing it in history.”

Clinton also reiterated her pledge to close her campaign the way she started her career – fighting for a better future for children and families. Just as she did in her first job at the Children’s Defense Fund Clinton said she will continue her fight to build an economy that works for all, not just those at the top, and the protect the rights of everyone, adding “We’ll stand by-side to make sure that all of our rights are respected and protected – civil rights and women’s rights, LGBT rights, worker’s rights and, of course, voting rights.”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below: “Hello, B-W-A. I thank you all for that warm welcome. There’s nowhere I’d rather be than right here with all of you this morning.

Please everyone be seated. This is such a great opportunity to lift up the work that so many of you have done for years – your organizations, individually – and I am grateful for it because it has helped to guide me in a lot of the work that I’ve been privileged to do.

I want to thank Gwen Hess for her introduction. I want to acknowledge, it’s always great to see a woman serve as president in any setting.

I want to congratulate today’s honorees. Everyone is so deserving of this recognition. I also want to acknowledge a few others. We have some fierce members of Congress with us today, women whom I admire, who have been my colleagues and friends and with whom I am looking forward to continuing our work: Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, Congresswoman Gwen Moore, Congresswoman Yvette Clarke, Congresswoman Stacey Plaskett.

And I want to give a special shout out to Congresswoman Joyce Beatty. When I saw Joyce recently, she said, ‘Well, you are coming, aren’t you?’ And I said, ‘I’m working hard to get it set.’ And I am so proud that it did work out, and I thank Joyce for that extra push.

I also want to acknowledge someone who had such a profound effect on my life, in every way, someone whom I admire and love, Marian Wright Edelman. This audience is filled with longtime friends and people I went to Wellesley College with that became life-long friends to me, and so many of you who have been on the front lines – everyone associated with The Black Women’s Agenda, I’m thrilled to be with you. I’m thrilled to be associated with you. I’m also thrilled to be back on the campaign trail. As the world knows, I was a little under the weather recently. The good news is, my pneumonia finally got some Republicans interested in women’s health.

Looking back, I know, I should have followed my doctor’s orders to rest, but, my instinct was to push through it. That is what women do every single day, and I felt no different. Life has shown us that we do have to work harder at the office while still bearing most of the responsibilities at home – that we always need to keep going because our families and our communities count on us. And I think it is more than fair to say, that black women have an even tougher road.

And you, your daughters, your granddaughters – I was pleased to meet Gwen’s beautiful granddaughter earlier – leave the house every morning, put on that game face that we all practice, and enter a society that consistently challenges your worth. With the images you see, the lower pay that so many take home, that try to silence your voices and break your spirits; yet, you remain fierce in the face of these challenges. We see that every day in the businesses you start, the art you create, the children you teach and the communities and organizations you lead. While your stories are often missing from the history books – make no mistake – you are the change makers, the path breakers, and the ground shakers. And, you are proof that yes, indeed, black girl magic is real.

Now, I’ve been blessed to see this magic’s influence on kids and communities up close for decades, starting with my first job after law school working with Marian at the Children’s Defense Fund. Marian’s belief was that every single child had worth and potential and deserved the opportunity to live up to their god potential with the tools and the support that every child needs. And that if we just improve the odds a bit for those suffering in poverty, they could flourish. So she led our team into some very poor communities. We met kids who had dropped out of school because they couldn’t afford textbooks or transportation. Some didn’t have decent clothes and stayed home to avoid being humiliated in class. Some had untreated medical and dental problems that made it practically impossible for them to learn. Those stories really hurt my heart.

But Marian always believed we could deliver help and hope if we never ever gave up. So she taught us ways to think creatively, as well as strategically– to take our advocacy and turn it into action and results. She sent me to New Bedford, Massachusetts, to go door to door looking for children who weren’t in school. That was back before we had a legal requirement that every child, regardless of disability, deserved to get an education. I met a young girl in New Bedford and sat and talked with her on the small back porch of her house. She told me how badly she wanted to learn, but couldn’t because schools weren’t accessible or welcoming.  So Marian had us get to work and change that.

We gathered evidence and built a coalition. We helped convince Congress to ensure access to education for all students with disabilities. Marian showed me that to drive real progress, you have to change both hearts and laws. You need both understanding and action. And there is no question, I’m here today because of her example. I also want to recognize pioneers like Barbara Jordan and Shirley Chisholm, who sacrificed and struggled so that I and so many other women running for office could soar. I’m here because of friends and colleagues, like Donna Brazile, Reverend Leah Daugherty and Congresswoman Marcia Fudge — three black women who ran the Democratic National Convention in July. It was a great four days.

It goes to show that black women deserve more than a seat at the table. It’s past time you had a fair chance to run the meeting. And let’s be clear: I would not be the Democratic nominee for President of the United States were it not for black women like all of you who made noise at the polls this year in support of our campaign – who did surrogate events, went to barber shops and beauty salons and cafes, got on local radio and local TV to make the case. We’ve come far together.

And as I said yesterday in North Carolina, I’m going to close my campaign the way I began my career all those years ago at the Children’s Defense Fund, and the way that I will serve as your president should I have the great honor of being elected:  I will be focused on opportunities for kids and fairness for families. The American people deserve something to vote for, not just against.

And together – together, we are going to make this a freer, fairer and stronger nation.

We’re going to fight for the parents struggling to balance family and work and push for affordable child care, paid family leave, and yes, finally, equal pay for women.

We’ll fight for the young girls who want a fair chance in life, which is why we’ll make universal pre-k available so that every child – no matter what they look like or where they live – can rise up and be prepared to fulfill their academic destiny.

We are also going to do a lot to emphasize STEM education, particularly for girls and women, and I thank the agenda for making that a priority!

We’ll fight for the entrepreneur who said that more businesses die in the parking lots of banks than anywhere else, which is why we’re going to increase access to capital, and we are going to help African American women continue to represent the fastest growing segment of women-owned businesses in America right now.

We are going to invest in communities that have been left out and left behind. Urban reinvestment and restructuring that is going to give more people decent housing, access to jobs, the transportation to get to those jobs, rural communities that are too often ignored and denied the services they need. I am a fan of Jim Clyburn’s ‘10-20-30’ plan. I am going to do everything I can to push that forward.

We’ll remember the pain of the Mothers of the Movement and fight for a criminal justice system that actually delivers justice and a future where everyone has respect for the law and is respected by the law. And we are going to pass common-sense reforms to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people and keep our communities safe.

We’ll remember the families neglected in Flint and take action so that no child’s life is ever put at risk again when brushing their teeth or drinking a glass of water at dinner.  We’ll advocate for everyone concerned about their parents and grandparents as they age, and lift up caregivers and home care workers so older Americans can live in comfort and with dignity.

And we’re going to protect and enhance Social Security, which is the main source of income for older women. We’ll stand-by-side to make sure that all of our rights are respected and protected – civil rights and women’s rights, LGBT rights, worker’s rights and, of course, voting rights.

We are coming together at a pivotal moment for our country. Now I do believe that every election is important. But this one feels different, doesn’t it? That’s because it is. The next 53 days will shape the next 50 years.  The future of our children and grandchildren hangs in the balance.

On one hand, we have my opponent, Donald Trump, and in recent weeks, he’s tried to restrain himself and clean up his image. But as Maya Angelou once said, ‘When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.’ And we know who Donald is. For five years, he has led the birther movement to de-legitimize our first black president. His campaign was founded on this outrageous lie. There is no erasing it in history.

Just yesterday, Trump again refused to say with his own words that the president was born in the United States. Donald’s advisors had the temerity to say, ‘He’s doing the country a ‘service’ by pushing these lies.’  No, he isn’t. He’s feeding into the worst impulses – the bigotry and bias – that lurks in our country.

Barack Obama was born in America, plain and simple.  And Donald Trump owes him and the American people an apology. So, my friends, there is no ‘new’ Donald Trump. There never will be. Donald Trump looks at President Obama after eight years as our president. He still doesn’t see him as an American.

Think of how dangerous that is. Imagine a person in the Oval Office who traffics in conspiracy theories and refuses to let them go – no matter what the facts are. Imagine someone who distorts the truth to fit a very narrow view of the world. Imagine a president who sees someone who doesn’t look like him, and doesn’t agree with him, and thinks, ‘That person must not be a real American.’

Donald Trump is unfit to be President of the United States. We cannot become insensitive to what he says and what he stirs up. We can’t just accept this.We’ve got to stand up to it. If we don’t, it won’t stop.

In addition to the president, Donald Trump looks at a distinguished federal judge, born in Indiana, and he sees a Mexican, not an American. He looks at a Gold Star family and sees them as Muslims, not patriotic Americans. He looks at women and decides how our looks rate on a scale of one to 10. I look at America, I see everyone.  I see our great diversity, which is one of our core strengths, not our burden. We know who Donald Trump is. Now it’s time for our country to show who we are and reject his divisive vision.

That’s why this election is so important.  As Michelle Obama said at the Democratic Convention, ‘When we go to the polls this November, the real choice isn’t between a Democrat or Republican.’ It’s about who will have the power to shape our children’s lives for the next four years. It’s also about the kind of country we want to be, and what we want to leave behind for future generations.

We are at our best when every person gets to share in our nation’s promise, contribute to its progress. ‘Stronger Together’ is not just our campaign slogan. It’s the guiding principle for the future we need to build. So Americans, we need to ask themselves: Are we going to make our economy work for everyone or just for those at the top?  Are we going to bring people together or pit Americans against each other and rip our country apart? Are we going to work with our allies to keep us safe or are we going to put a loose cannon in charge who would risk everything that generations of Americans have worked so hard to build?

Now in many ways, the profound choice is up to the women in this room. African American women turned out to vote more than any other group of Americans in 2012. This year, once again, you have your hands on the wheel of history and you can write the next chapter of the American story.

Keep up the great work with your Four for 4’ campaign. Make sure we get as many people registered and then to the polls as we possibly can. People say to me all time, ‘I just – I don’t know what to do about Trump and his supporters and the things he says and inciting violence and all of the terrible activities that are happening this election year.’

Well, here’s what we can do. Let’s reject the cynicism, the bullying, the divisive rhetoric that my opponent uses to make us afraid of each other, afraid of our differences, afraid of our future. I know that all of us in this room are ready to stand up against this … to rise up for our families, our communities, but most importantly, to show up at the polls this November.

With our power and strength, I know – I believe this, or I would not be standing here before you, I would not have run again for president, I would not deal with all the incoming brickbats that are hurled my way if I did not in my heart believe with every fiber of my being that together we can build a future where, yes, love trumps hate.

Thank you very much. Thank you.”

 

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STAND

Hillary wrapped up her first day back on the trail at the CHCI Gala in Washington, D.C.  You will find Hillary near the 56 minute mark.

At Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, Hillary Clinton Calls On Americans to Reject Trump’s Birtherism and Divisive Rhetoric 

At the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute on Thursday, Hillary Clinton called on Americans to reject the bluster and bigotry of Donald Trump, who is still refusing to say that President Obama was born in the United States. Clinton called on the American people to “decide who we are,” adding “If we just sigh and accept this, what does that tell our kids about who we are? We need to stand up and repudiate this divisive rhetoric. We need to stop him conclusively in November in an election that sends a message that even he can hear.”

Muslims and Latinos remain targets of Trump’s divisive campaign, Clinton said, as Trump promises to deport 16 million people living and working among us. Clinton has a different vision: she will introduce comprehensive immigration reform in her first 100 days and work to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. Clinton also paid tribute to the Latino community’s contributions to our country adding, “Whether your family just arrived or has been here since before the United States even existed, you’re not strangers. You’re not intruders. You’re our neighbors, our colleagues, our friends, our families. You make our nation stronger, smarter, more creative. And I want you to know that I see you and I am with you, and time and again.”

Clinton concluded by asking the audience to talk with their neighbors, register voters, and together choose a brighter future on November 8th.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello! Hello, CHCI! It is so great to be back here with so many friends and to see so many young people here because that fits the theme this year: educate, engage, vote. And I can’t think of better marching orders for the next 54 days. And anyone who just heard the congresswoman knows we cannot be on the sidelines. This is the most consequential election in our lifetimes.

I want to recognize the Institute for all you do to inspire the next generation of Latino leaders. Last year, I had the chance to spend time with some of the CHCI interns and fellows. It really was like seeing the future of America in one room. I can’t wait to see everything that they achieve. And I can’t wait, if I’m fortunate enough to be president, to put some of them to work!

And I want to thank all my friends in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. You fight every single day to lift up the Latino community – when the cameras are rolling and when the cameras are off, at home in your districts and here in Washington. And no one understands better than you the pivotal moment we’re at right now – not just for Latinos but for our country.

My friends in the caucus have traveled to every battleground state, registered voters. You’ve stayed focused no matter what kind of outlandish and offensive comments we have heard from my opponent and his supporters. By the way, I personally think a taco truck on every corner sounds absolutely delicious.

Now, here’s a confession: Running for president is never easy, but it shouldn’t be, right? But tonight I have the ultimate challenge: speaking after President Obama. He’s always a tough act to follow, in more ways than one.

I, for one, don’t think the President gets the credit he deserves for rescuing our economy from another Great Depression. Think of what we’ve achieved these last eight years. American businesses have created 15 million new jobs since the recession. Twenty million Americans have health coverage – and no one has seen a bigger drop in uninsured rates under the Affordable Care Act than Latino Americans. We got more good news this week. A report came out showing that poverty is going down, and incomes for American families are going up, and Latino families have seen the biggest increase of all.

Now, that doesn’t mean we rest on our laurels by any stretch. Our work is far from finished. But I am more confident than ever that our best days are still ahead of us. I believe with all my heart that the American Dream is alive and it’s big enough for everyone to share its promise. That doesn’t mean that lots of people are still not hurting, because I know they are. And when you hear a presidential candidate spewing bigotry and hate, it’s easy to get discouraged. But we’re here because we know this election is a choice between not just two people but two very different visions for our America’s future.

Either we’re going to make our economy work for everyone, or just those at the top.

Either we’re going to fear our differences, or embrace and celebrate our diversity.

Either we’re going to pit Americans against each other and deepen the divides, or we’re going to be stronger together.

Today, as you know, we’re in the midst of Hispanic Heritage Month. In classrooms across America, children will study Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez, Julián and Joaquín Castro, Justice Sotomayor, Roberto Clemente and Laurie Hernandez, Gloria Estefan and Lin-Manuel Miranda, and countless others – names we know and names we might not know, but every one of whom has enriched this country for generations.

Whether you’re Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Latin American, Afro-Latino, whether your family just arrived or has been here since before the United States even existed [cheers], you’re not strangers. You’re not intruders. You’re our neighbors, our colleagues, our friends, our families. You make our nation stronger, smarter, more creative. And I want you to know that I see you and I am with you, and time and again – time and again we have seen that when we invest in the community, when we make it possible for Latinos to get the health care you need, get the education you desire, compete for jobs, start new businesses, pursue your dreams, all of America benefits.

As I said this afternoon in North Carolina, we are in the final stretch of this election. And I intend to close my campaign the way I began my career, fighting for kids and families. That’s been the cause of my life. It will be the passion of my presidency. So tonight I want to mention two things I’ll do in the first 100 days of my administration to help families in every corner of America.

First, we do need to create an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. There’s something wrong when Latinos are 17 percent of our country’s population but hold only 2 percent of its wealth. We’ve got to work together to connect more Latinos with good jobs that pay good wages, with more opportunities to get the skills they need, to go to college, to launch new ventures, to build wealth that can be passed on to your kids and your grandkids. So we’re going to make, in my first 100 days, the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II, jobs in infrastructure, manufacturing, technology, innovative, clean energy.

And we’re going to cut red tape and taxes and expand access to capital for small businesses, including the Latino-owned small businesses that create so many jobs and so much growth in communities everywhere. And I want to give a particular shout-out to Latina small business owners. Not everyone knows this, but you are among the fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs in America. And we’re going to put families first with new solutions that reflect the way people live and work today. Supporting families with paid family leave, earned sick days, and affordable childcare isn’t a luxury, it’s a necessity. When families are strong, America is strong.

And that brings me to another important family issue. In those first 100 days, I will send a proposal for comprehensive immigration reform to the Congress. My proposal will keep families together, and it will include a path to citizenship. Now, I know this isn’t the first time you’ve heard it. In fact, people have been making the same promise for more than a decade. But I believe with all my heart that some things are too important to give up on. I’ve been called a lot of things; I’ve never been called a quitter.

And in this election – in this election, we have a chance to show that comprehensive immigration reform isn’t just the smart thing to do, it’s what the American people demand. And you know how we’ll show that? Well, I hope to have a Democratic Congress next January. [Cheers.] But no matter what, on my first day in office I will reach out to Republicans and say, this is your chance to help millions of families and show that your party, the party of Lincoln, is better than Donald Trump.

And while we’re fighting for comprehensive immigration reform, we’re going to keep families together. When the deadlocked Supreme Court put DAPA and expanded DACA on hold for 5 million immigrants, it was devastating to millions of families. But the court didn’t actually rule on the substance of the case. And as I’ve said repeatedly, I believe DAPA and expanded DACA are squarely within the President’s authority, and will I protect them and keep fighting for them.

But in addition to defending DAPA and DACA, there’s more we can do. We need a simple, straightforward system where other people with sympathetic cases who are contributing to their communities can make their case and be eligible for deferred action too. Like people who experience and report extreme labor abuses. And we won’t stop there. We’re going to end family detention, close private detention facilities, and stop the raids and roundups. No child should have to say goodbye to their parents every morning not knowing if their mom or dad will be there when they get home.

So here’s the bottom line. Comprehensive immigration reform will not only be the right thing to do, but it will add $700 billion to our economy and enable America to be what it’s always been – a place where people from around the world can come to reunite with family, start new businesses, pursue their dreams, apply their talents to American growth and innovation.

Now, I know this has been a long road and we wouldn’t be where we are today without your persistence and the quiet courage of families in every state of our union, and we certainly wouldn’t be here without the bravery of the young men and women who have risked their very place in the United States by coming forward and fighting for their own future and the future of millions of others. They helped change the conversation. And when President Obama created DACA, it changed their lives.

Right now, 750,000 undocumented young people in America are going to school, working, and planning for their future. They’re DREAMers in much more than name. I’ve met so many. I’ve listened to their stories. They’ve done everything we’ve asked of them and made our country stronger in return.

So when Donald Trump promises to rip that all away on Day One, when he promises to round up and deport all of the 16 million people living and working among us, including American citizen children who were born here to parents who are undocumented, these are the faces I see.

I picture Astrid Silva – who I met in Las Vegas. Many of you know her story: She came to this country from Mexico at the age of four with nothing but a doll, a cross, and the dress she was wearing. Now she’s in her 20s, advocating for the rights of everywhere.

I picture a young man I never met, whose high school teacher wrote me a few months ago to share his story. His teacher told me that his former student was funny, enthusiastic, and patriotic. He played the drums in the school marching band and after graduation in 2005, proudly enlisted in the U.S. Army. Before shipping off to Iraq, he stopped by the school so everyone could see him in his new uniform.

He was, his teacher wrote, ‘as respectful and optimistic as any student who ever entered my classroom.’ He was also a DREAMer, brought here as an undocumented child. He loved America, and hoped one day to earn his citizenship. But in April 2007, while on a mission in Baghdad, he was killed by an improvised explosive device. He was just 19. The Army called him a hero and he was posthumously granted the American citizenship he’d always wanted.

All these years later – his teacher still treasures his memory. And this teacher wanted me to know – he wanted me to know that despite what Donald Trump may say, immigrants are not rapists and criminals. The truth is, this young man may not have been born here, but he represented the best values of our country.

We teach our children that America is one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. Not just for people who look a certain way or worship a certain way, but for all. Everywhere I go, people tell me how concerned they are by the extreme policies and divisive rhetoric they’ve heard from my opponent – from the racist lie about Mexican immigrants that launched his presidential campaign to his racist attacks on a federal judge.

And every time we think he’s hit rock bottom, he sinks even lower. His latest target? A minister in Flint, Michigan who respectfully asked him not to use her pulpit for political attacks. He called her a nervous mess.

How insulting, how dead wrong. Reverend Faith Green Timmons is not a nervous mess – she’s a rock for her community in trying times, and she deserves better and so does America. And again today, he did it again. He was asked one more time, ‘Where was President Obama born?’ And he still wouldn’t still say ‘Hawaii.’ He still wouldn’t say ‘America.’ This man wants to be our next president? When will he stop this ugliness, this bigotry?

Now, he’s tried to reset himself and his campaign many times. This is the best he can do. This is who he is. And so we need to decide who we are. If we just sigh and shake our heads and accept this, then what does that tell our kids about who we are? We need to stand up and repudiate this divisive rhetoric. We need to stop him conclusively in November in an election that sends a message that even he can hear. We need to set the kind of example we want for ourselves and our children and our grandchildren

Parents and teachers are already worried about what they’re calling the ‘Trump Effect.’ Bullying and harassment are on the rise in our schools, especially targeting students of color, Muslims, and immigrants.

At a high school basket game in Indiana, white students held up Trump signs and taunted Latino players on the opposing team with chants of ‘Build the wall’ and ‘Speak English.’

Donald Trump is running the most divisive campaigns of our lifetimes. His message is you should be afraid – afraid of people whose race or ethnicity is different, or whose religious faith is different, or who were born in a different country. There’s no innuendo or dog whistles anymore. It’s all right out there in the open now. So we’ve got to come back twice as strong and twice as clear.

Just this week, a mother in Florida wrote to me about her 11-year-old son, Francisco. He’s proud to be American, Colombian, Ecuadorian, and Puerto Rican. As he calls it, a ‘potluck’ of Hispanic heritage. And Francisco has been following this election very closely, his mother told me. He wears his ‘Love Trumps Hate’ pin every day and refuses to take it off. When his father warned him that might make him a target for bullies, Francisco looked his father in the eye and he said: ‘I was always told to stand up for myself and what I believe in. And I believe Trump is wrong.’ And good for you, Francisco.

That’s what we have to do in this election, and that’s what so many of you are doing already: standing up to the bullying and bigotry wherever it comes from.

Together, we must send this resounding message, and we need to inspire a level of turnout that will help us win up and down the ticket.

We’ve set an ambitious goal of registering and committing 3 million people to vote in this election that would not have otherwise voted, and we can’t do it without you. Nearly half of Latinos in America are under 35, and we need you to show up and make your voices heard in this election.

So we’re going to keep asking for your help. Keep hitting the campaign trail. Please talk to your friends, your neighbors, your community – everyone you see between now and November 8th. Tell them to go to hillaryclinton.com, or text JOIN, J-O-I-N to 47246 to get involved. This election is too important for anyone to sit on the sidelines, as we heard from Congresswoman Sanchez.

So let’s stand up for a future where we put families first. Where we build bridges, not walls.

And yes, together we can prove love trumps hate. Thank you all very much.”

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At the risk of bordering on shallow but in the interest of the current obsession with Hillary’s health and fitness, I am obliged to comment on this jacket which I have always loved.  Hillary wore the same jacket at last year’s CHCI Gala.  At the time, I mentioned that we had first seen it in Baden Baden in April 2009 and shared this picture.

BADEN BADEN, GERMANY - APRIL 03: U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives at the opening of the NATO summit at the Kurhaus on April 3, 2009 in Baden Baden, Germany. Heads of state, foreign ministers and defence ministers of the 28 NATO member countries are participating in the summit from April 3-4 in Strasbourg, Kehl and Baden Baden to mark the 60th anniversary of the transatlantic military and political organization. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

BADEN BADEN, GERMANY – APRIL 03: U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives at the opening of the NATO summit at the Kurhaus on April 3, 2009 in Baden Baden, Germany. Heads of state, foreign ministers and defence ministers of the 28 NATO member countries are participating in the summit from April 3-4 in Strasbourg, Kehl and Baden Baden to mark the 60th anniversary of the transatlantic military and political organization. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Seems pretty clear that Hillary is the same size as she was when she first wore it and is in beautiful shape!  So no more snarkiness about her health, condition, or fitness!

STAND

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