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Posts Tagged ‘Dmitry Medvedev’

We loved Nicholas Sarkozy in the role of Prince Charming when our gorgeous Cinderella lost her slipper on the steps of the Elysee Palace once-upon-a-time.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, left, loses her shoe as she is greeted upon her arrival by French President Nicolas Sarkozy, right, on the steps of the Elysee palace, Paris, Friday, Jan. 29, 2010. Clinton flew to Paris on Friday for talks with French officials and to give a speech on European security in which she will underscore the Obama administration’s commitment to the continent’s security. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Last month she clearly charmed French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe on a visit to Paris.

French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe (R) turns to speak to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during the family photo during the meeting of “The Friends of Syria” in Paris April 19, 2012. Major international powers meeting in Paris on Thursday called a U.N.-backed peace plan the “last hope” to resolve the Syrian crisis and said they would do all they could to help it succeed, according to draft conclusions obtained by Reuters. The agenda of the “Friends of Syria” meeting, which includes France, the United States, Saudi Arabia and Qatar, is to ensure the Arab League-U.N. plan succeeds. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE – Tags: POLITICS)

It is all history now as a new French government prepares to step to the fore under Socialist François Hollande.  We will watch with interest as our intrepid SOS greets the new leadership.  We expect to see smart power on steroids in the coming weeks.

Hollande defeats Sarkozy in French presidential election


Top story: Francois Hollande beat French President Nicolas Sarkozy with just over 51 percent of the vote in a runoff election on Sunday, becoming the first Socialist to win the presidency since Francois Mitterrand left office in 1995. Sarkozy, the first French president since 1981 to not win a second term, will officially transfer power to Hollande on May 15.

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Meanwhile, on the Russian front. he-man superstar Vladimir Putin has reclaimed his former post as president.

Vladimir Putin Sworn In For Third Term As Russia’s President

By LYNN BERRY 05/07/12 07:48 AM ET AP

MOSCOW — Vladimir Putin took the oath of office in a brief but regal Kremlin ceremony on Monday, while on the streets outside thousands of helmeted riot police prevented hundreds of demonstrators from protesting his return to the presidency.

Putin, 59, has ruled Russia since 2000, first as president and then during the past four years as prime minister. The new, now six-year term will keep him in power until 2018, with the option of running for a fourth term.

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Four years ago, when Dmitri Medvedev stepped into the presidency, there was speculation that he was a placeholder for Putin.  Those whispers   have never died down. We see her here with Putin at a meeting at his residence in Russia which had not been scheduled but which she requested.

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, left, greets U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton during a meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo just outside Moscow, Friday, March 19, 2010. Clinton said Friday that American and Russian negotiators are “on the brink” of agreement on a nuclear arms reduction treaty. (AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Alexei Nikolsky, Pool)

We can reasonably expect that aside from dealing anew with Putin, Mme. Secretary will continue her successful working relationship with Sergei Lavrov whom we do not expect to see replaced and with whom she successfully hammered out the New START Treaty.

US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, and Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov smile as they exchange documents after finalizing the New START treaty during the Conference on Security Policy in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

So, at least as far as Russia is concerned, plus ça change, plus c’est la meme chose.

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Secretary Clinton Outlines Nuclear Security Strategy in International Op-Ed

Media Note

Washington, DC
April 8, 2010

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton today told European publics that the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) is one of several concrete steps the U.S. is taking to reduce the global threat of nuclear weapons, proliferation and terrorism.

In an op-ed originally published in The Guardian newspaper in the United Kingdom and also appearing in Germany’s Berliner Zeitung, Frankfurter Rundschau, Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger and Mitteldeutsche Zeitung; Austria’s Der Standard; Poland’s Gazeta Wyborcza; France’s Le Figaro; Turkey’s Hurriyet; Croatia’s Vjesnik; Serbia’s Politika; Slovakia’s Pravda; Spain’s ABC; Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Dnevni Avaz and Nezavisne Novine; Bulgaria’s Kapital; and Cyprus’ Phileleftheros, Secretary Clinton cited the progress achieved since President Obama’s speech in Prague last April and stressed the importance of international cooperation in addressing nuclear security challenges. Other international newspapers will carry the Secretary’s column tomorrow.

Read more at The Guardian’s web site here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2010/apr/07/world-nuclear-danger-treaty-america.

The full text of Secretary Clinton’s op-ed follows:

Our Giant Step Towards a World Free from Nuclear Danger

This treaty shows the strength of America’s commitment to global disarmament – and to our national security
By Hillary Rodham Clinton

Today the United States and Russia will sign the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) in Prague, reducing the number of strategic nuclear warheads in our arsenals to levels not seen since the first decade of the nuclear age. This verifiable reduction by the world’s two largest nuclear powers reflects our commitment to the basic bargain of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) — all nations have the right to seek the peaceful use of nuclear energy, but they all also have the responsibility to prevent nuclear proliferation, and those that do possess these weapons must work toward disarmament.

This agreement is just one of several concrete steps the United States is taking to make good on President Obama’s pledge to make America and the world safer by reducing the threat of nuclear weapons, proliferation and terrorism.

On Tuesday, the President announced the U.S. Government’s Nuclear Posture Review (NPR), which provides a roadmap for reducing the role and numbers of our nuclear weapons while more effectively protecting the United States and our allies from today’s most pressing threats.

Next week, President Obama will host more than 40 leaders at a Nuclear Security Summit for the purpose of securing all vulnerable nuclear materials as swiftly as possible to prevent them from falling into the hands of terrorists.

And along with our international partners, the United States is pursuing diplomatic efforts that create real consequences for states such as Iran and North Korea that defy the global nonproliferation regime.

These steps send clear messages about our priorities and our resolve.

To our allies and partners, and all those who have long looked to the United States as an underwriter of regional and global security: Our commitment to defend our interests and our allies has never been stronger. These steps will make us all safer and more secure.

To those who refuse to meet their international obligations and seek to intimidate their neighbors: The world is more united than ever before and will not accept your intransigence.

Today’s agreement is a testament to our own determination to meet our obligations under the NPT and the special responsibilities that the United States and Russia bear as the two largest nuclear powers.

The New START Treaty includes a 30 percent reduction in the number of strategic nuclear warheads the United States and Russia are permitted to deploy and a strong and effective verification regime, which will further stabilize the relationship between our two countries as well as reduce the risks of miscommunication or miscalculation.

And the Treaty places no constraints on our missile defense plans – now or in the future.

President Obama’s Nuclear Posture Review makes the principles behind this Treaty – and our larger nonproliferation and arms control agenda – part of our national security strategy. Today nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism have replaced the Cold War-era danger of a large-scale nuclear attack as the most urgent threat to U.S. and global security. The NPR outlines a new approach that will ensure that our defenses and diplomacy are geared toward meeting these challenges effectively.

As part of this new approach, the United States pledges not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against a non-nuclear weapons state that is party to the NPT and in compliance with its nuclear nonproliferation obligations. The United States would only consider the use of nuclear weapons in extreme circumstances to defend the vital interests of the United States or its allies and partners. There should be no doubt, however, that we will hold fully accountable any state, terrorist group, or other non-state actor that supports or enables terrorist efforts to obtain or use weapons of mass destruction.

The NPR also emphasizes close cooperation with our allies around the world, and maintains our firm commitment to mutual security. We will work with our partners to reinforce regional security architectures, such as missile defenses, and other conventional military capabilities. The United States will continue to maintain a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent for ourselves and our allies so long as these weapons exist anywhere in the world.

Nuclear proliferation and terrorism are global challenges, and they demand a global response. That is why President Obama has invited leaders from around the world to Washington for a Nuclear Security Summit and will seek commitments from all nations – especially those that enjoy the benefits of civilian nuclear power – to take steps to stop proliferation and secure vulnerable nuclear materials. If terrorists ever acquired these dangerous materials, the results would be too terrible to imagine.

All nations must recognize that the nonproliferation regime cannot survive if violators are allowed to act with impunity. That is why we are working to build international consensus for steps that will convince Iran’s leaders to change course, including new UN Security Council sanctions that will further clarify their choice of upholding their obligations or facing increasing isolation and painful consequences. With respect to North Korea, we continue to send the message that simply returning to the negotiating table is not enough. Pyongyang must move toward complete and verifiable denuclearization, through irreversible steps, if it wants a normalized, sanctions-free relationship with the United States.

All these steps, all our treaties, summits and sanctions, share the goal of increasing the security of the United States, our allies, and people everywhere.

Last April, President Obama stood in Hradcany Square in Prague and challenged the world to pursue a future free of the nuclear dangers that have loomed over us all for more than a half century. This is the work of a lifetime, if not longer. But today, one year later, we are making real progress toward that goal.

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Actually, they have not posted any! Not even an “on foreign travel” schedule, which, of course you knew.  They did send out this op-ed  penned (typed) by our brilliant Secretary of State who is looking just smashing there in the same green jacket that I was talking about last night!

Secretary Clinton Outlines Nuclear Security Strategy in International Op-Ed

Washington, DC
April 8, 2010

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton today told European publics that the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) is one of several concrete steps the U.S. is taking to reduce the global threat of nuclear weapons, proliferation and terrorism.
In an op-ed originally published in The Guardian newspaper in the United Kingdom and also appearing in Germany’s Berliner Zeitung, Frankfurter Rundschau, Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger and Mitteldeutsche Zeitung, and Poland’s Gazeta Wyborcza, Secretary Clinton cited the progress achieved since President Obama’s speech in Prague last April and stressed the importance of international cooperation in addressing nuclear security challenges. Other international newspapers will carry the Secretary’s column tomorrow.
The full text of Secretary Clinton’s op-ed follows:
Our Giant Step Towards a World Free from Nuclear Danger
This treaty shows the strength of America’s commitment to global disarmament – and to our national security
By Hillary Rodham Clinton
Today the United States and Russia will sign the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) in Prague, reducing the number of strategic nuclear warheads in our arsenals to levels not seen since the first decade of the nuclear age. This verifiable reduction by the world’s two largest nuclear powers reflects our commitment to the basic bargain of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) — all nations have the right to seek the peaceful use of nuclear energy, but they all also have the responsibility to prevent nuclear proliferation, and those that do possess these weapons must work toward disarmament.
This agreement is just one of several concrete steps the United States is taking to make good on President Obama’s pledge to make America and the world safer by reducing the threat of nuclear weapons, proliferation and terrorism.
On Tuesday, the President announced the U.S. Government’s Nuclear Posture Review (NPR), which provides a roadmap for reducing the role and numbers of our nuclear weapons while more effectively protecting the United States and our allies from today’s most pressing threats.
Next week, President Obama will host more than 40 leaders at a Nuclear Security Summit for the purpose of securing all vulnerable nuclear materials as swiftly as possible to prevent them from falling into the hands of terrorists.
And along with our international partners, the United States is pursuing diplomatic efforts that create real consequences for states such as Iran and North Korea that defy the global nonproliferation regime.
These steps send clear messages about our priorities and our resolve.
To our allies and partners, and all those who have long looked to the United States as an underwriter of regional and global security: Our commitment to defend our interests and our allies has never been stronger. These steps will make us all safer and more secure.
To those who refuse to meet their international obligations and seek to intimidate their neighbors: The world is more united than ever before and will not accept your intransigence.
Today’s agreement is a testament to our own determination to meet our obligations under the NPT and the special responsibilities that the United States and Russia bear as the two largest nuclear powers.
The New START Treaty includes a 30 percent reduction in the number of strategic nuclear warheads the United States and Russia are permitted to deploy and a strong and effective verification regime, which will further stabilize the relationship between our two countries as well as reduce the risks of miscommunication or miscalculation.
And the Treaty places no constraints on our missile defense plans – now or in the future.
President Obama’s Nuclear Posture Review makes the principles behind this Treaty – and our larger nonproliferation and arms control agenda – part of our national security strategy. Today nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism have replaced the Cold War-era danger of a large-scale nuclear attack as the most urgent threat to U.S. and global security. The NPR outlines a new approach that will ensure that our defenses and diplomacy are geared toward meeting these challenges effectively.
As part of this new approach, the United States pledges not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against a non-nuclear weapons state that is party to the NPT and in compliance with its nuclear nonproliferation obligations. The United States would only consider the use of nuclear weapons in extreme circumstances to defend the vital interests of the United States or its allies and partners. There should be no doubt, however, that we will hold fully accountable any state, terrorist group, or other non-state actor that supports or enables terrorist efforts to obtain or use weapons of mass destruction.
The NPR also emphasizes close cooperation with our allies around the world, and maintains our firm commitment to mutual security. We will work with our partners to reinforce regional security architectures, such as missile defenses, and other conventional military capabilities. The United States will continue to maintain a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent for ourselves and our allies so long as these weapons exist anywhere in the world.
Nuclear proliferation and terrorism are global challenges, and they demand a global response. That is why President Obama has invited leaders from around the world to Washington for a Nuclear Security Summit and will seek commitments from all nations – especially those that enjoy the benefits of civilian nuclear power – to take steps to stop proliferation and secure vulnerable nuclear materials. If terrorists ever acquired these dangerous materials, the results would be too terrible to imagine.
All nations must recognize that the nonproliferation regime cannot survive if violators are allowed to act with impunity. That is why we are working to build international consensus for steps that will convince Iran’s leaders to change course, including new UN Security Council sanctions that will further clarify their choice of upholding their obligations or facing increasing isolation and painful consequences. With respect to North Korea, we continue to send the message that simply returning to the negotiating table is not enough. Pyongyang must move toward complete and verifiable denuclearization, through irreversible steps, if it wants a normalized, sanctions-free relationship with the United States.
All these steps, all our treaties, summits and sanctions, share the goal of increasing the security of the United States, our allies, and people everywhere.
Last April, President Obama stood in Hradcany Square in Prague and challenged the world to pursue a future free of the nuclear dangers that have loomed over us all for more than a half century. This is the work of a lifetime, if not longer. But today, one year later, we are making real progress toward that goal.

Read Full Post »

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