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Remarks at Flag-Raising Ceremony

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
U.S. Consulate
Alexandria, Egypt
July 15, 2012

SECRETARY CLINTON: Thank you very much. And let me begin by expressing appreciation for your patience. We had excellent meetings in Cairo today, but they all ran long. There was a lot to say, and we wanted everybody to be able to say it. So I apologize for keeping you waiting.

I am delighted to be here in Alexandria. As Anne just said, it is my first trip, although I hope not my last. And it is much too short a trip. Ever since I was a little girl, I have read about the history of this extraordinary city and what it has contributed to not only Egypt but humanity. And I look forward to watching the next chapters be written.

I want to recognize our Ambassador, Anne Patterson, who came with me from Cairo. I want to thank the Governor for being with us today. I’m very grateful to you, Governor, for taking time out to share this occasion with us. I want to also recognize Mrs. Gendi from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs as well as representatives of the diplomatic, governmental, business and religious communities, as well as educational institutions. It’s also good to have a number of those who work in this consulate and who will be part of providing the services that it will offer to Egyptians and Americans alike.

Some of you know that this day has been a long time coming. On September 30th 1993, the American flag at our consulate in Alexandria was lowered. Although we would maintain a presence here, the consulate itself was shut down. Luckily, someone had the foresight to hold on to the flag that they lowered that day because they hoped, as we did, that this day would come and a flag would once again fly in Alexandria. And today we do that. By raising it once more, the American consulate is open for business.

Now, as exciting as this day is, we know that there is a lot of work ahead of us. On my visit to Egypt yesterday and today, I told people I wanted to listen more than talk. I wanted to hear firsthand the concerns, the issues, the aspirations that could be represented to me both by officials as well as citizens. And what I have heard is (inaudible) at what Egyptians have accomplished but also, understandably, questions about the future. People want to know and are vigorously debating this among themselves, as you know so well, what this democratic transition occurring in Egypt will be like. Where will it lead? Will it produce economic opportunity for those who have waited so long, better education and healthcare services for those who need it so much? And will it produce institutions, a constitution, a government that protects the rights of all Egyptians? Now, Egyptians have to answer all these questions for yourselves. We want to be a good partner. We want to stand with you. But the revolution was yours, and so is this transition, and so will be what the transition produces.

I have come to Alexandria to reaffirm the strong support of the United States for the Egyptian people and for your democratic future. Yesterday in Cairo, I spoke about the immediate questions that you are facing. And today, I want to take a few minutes to talk about the kind of democracy you are trying to build. Now, I well understand – and I heard it today from many different voices – that Egyptian media can be quite creative in depicting my country. And I know some Egyptians have doubts about where we stand. In fact, I’ve heard it argued over the last 18 months that America spoke too loudly, and America spoke too softly; that America spoke too early, and America spoke too late. And I’ve heard it that we support one faction in Egypt’s politics and then only weeks later, I hear that we are supporting another faction in Egypt’s politics. And I want to be clear that the United States is not in the business in Egypt of choosing winners and losers – even if we could, which of course we cannot. We are prepared to work with you as you chart your course, as you establish your democracy.

Now, we do have some experience in democracy. We are the oldest democracy in the world. India has the great honor of being the largest democracy in the world. And we have learned a few lessons over that 236 years that we have been practicing democracy. And we want to stand for principles, for values, not for people or for parties but for what democracy means in our understanding and experience.

The Egyptian people have every right in this new democracy to look to their leaders to protect the rights of all citizens, to govern in a fair and inclusive manner, and to respect the results of elections. We often say that the first election is hard, but the second election is more important because one election does not make a democracy. There has to be a peaceful surrender of power. I have won elections, and I have lost elections. And I remember back when I started traveling as Secretary of State, the main question on people’s minds was, “How could you work with President Obama? You ran against him. You tried to beat him, but he beat you.” And so the answer is simple. We both love our country, and we both want to serve our people.

So when we talk about supporting democracy, we mean real democracy, because around the world today there are people who claim to be democrats, who oppress their people, who discriminate against some of their citizens, who use the tools of government not to advance the people’s interests but to enrich themselves.

So what we believe is that the principles of democracy have to be enshrined not only in the constitution, not only in the institutions of government, but in the hearts and minds of the people. What does that mean in practice? Well, to us, real democracy means that every citizen has the right to live, work, and worship as they choose, whether they are man or woman, Muslim or Christian, or from any other background. Real democracy means that no group or faction or leader can impose their will, their ideology, their religion, their desires on anyone else. Where there is healthy competition, then there is the free exchange of ideas. And we believe that as frustrating as debate and dialogue can sometimes be, that we are (inaudible). None of us has a monopoly on the truth, and we will make better decisions by listening to one another and by learning to compromise.

We look for checks and balances, so no leader or no institution gets too powerful. In my discussions with President Morsi yesterday, I emphasized that we believe the success of his presidency – indeed Egypt’s success – depends upon building consensus across the Egyptian political spectrum and speaking to the needs and concerns of all Egyptians – all faiths, all communities, men and women alike. That will not only take dialogue and compromise; it will also take real leadership and real political activity.

Earlier today, I met with members of Egypt’s Christian community, with a number of women leaders and advocates, and with young entrepreneurs who want to demonstrate that Egyptian young people are just as innovative and successful as young people anywhere. They have legitimate concerns, and I will be honest and say some (inaudible) about their future. And I said to them, and what I will repeat, no Egyptian, no persons anywhere, should be persecuted for their faith or their lack of faith or their choices about working and not working.

Democracy is not just about reflecting the will of the majority; it is also about protecting the rights of the minority. We had to learn that the hard way. When our Constitution was written, it did not include women. It did not include African American slaves. It did not include white men who did not own property. It was really a Constitution for a very small number of people in our country at that time. But we learned over the years how to expand the circle of citizenship and opportunity. And we believe that that is now what will be expected in the 21st century. And we look to Egypt and Egyptians from all areas, all walks of life, to support real democracy.

Now, our engagement will be not only with the Egyptian Government, but it will be, more importantly, the Egyptian people. That’s why this consulate is so important, because we want to make it clear that we’re not just in Cairo talking to officials. We are in the country talking to people, helping in ways that are appropriate, working with different groups, especially with civil society.

So here in Alexandria and across Egypt, we are focused on helping Egyptians create jobs, grow the economy, widen the circle of prosperity. We will deliver on the economic package that President Obama announced to leave up to $1 billion that Egypt gets to create U.S.-Egypt enterprise funds run by distinguished Egyptian and American business leaders, to be looking for ways to provide credit to small and medium-sized businesses that will be at the heart of the Egyptian economic growth. That will be especially important here in Alexandria, which you know so well is the economic engine of Egypt, a town where 30 percent of the country is (inaudible) nearly 80 percent of shipping.

And we are supporting things like the (inaudible) Center here in Alexandria, offering one-stop shopping for businesses in order to cut through all the red tape and get going faster, so that they can be in the marketplace. I will be sending a high-level delegation of American businesses in early September to look at trade and investment opportunities.

Now, our relationship is not new by any means. Millions of Americans have come to this country, and particularly to this city, to admire your heritage. We are proud to have Egyptian Americans as part of our society. And over more than three decades, the United States has helped more than 3 million Egyptian entrepreneurs find access to financing, provided scholarships for nearly 200,000 women and girls, and helped millions of Egyptians get access to clean water and sanitation. In fact, here in Alexandria we’ve invested more than $700 million the last 15 years to improve basic services like water and sanitation.

But this is a new (inaudible), a new beginning for our partnership. And we are looking forward to defining it with you. We understand Egypt’s challenges are real. But from our perspective, we believe the talents of nearly 90 million Egyptians is more than up to the job they have; and we will work with you. We will support you. We will give you whatever equipment we can as you create an Egyptian democracy. And then in 100 years or 200 years from now, someone from Alexandria or Cairo or elsewhere in Egypt will be able to talk about Egyptian democracy and what it has meant to the people of Egypt in terms of new opportunities for themselves and for generations of their children.

For thousands of years, Alexandria has been a place where cultures and faiths live side by side. This city’s lighthouse and library stood as beacons to travelers and scholars who came from around the ancient world to discuss the great questions of their day. It is only right that the United States should have a small diplomatic presence here. And I thank the people of Alexandria for their hospitality and for working with us to once again have a consulate that is going to exemplify our relationship. I’m proud to join you in opening this new chapter in a partnership between Egypt and the United States.

Thank you all very much. (Applause.)

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US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is pictured at Cairo International Airport on July 15, 2012 before her departure to Egypt’s coastal city of Alexandria. Clinton is visiting Egypt to meet with the nation’s newly elected president and other government and civil leaders to speak about the relationship between the United States and the new democracy. AFP PHOTO/POOL/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP###

 

Public Schedule for July 15, 2012

Public Schedule

Washington, DC
July 15, 2012

SECRETARY HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON

Secretary Clinton is on foreign travel in Cairo, Egypt and Alexandria, Egypt. The Secretary is accompanied by Acting Assistant Secretary Jones, Assistant Secretary Posner, Spokesperson Nuland, Director Sullivan, National Security Council Senior Director for the Middle East and North Africa Steve Simon, and VADM Harry B. Harris, Jr., JCS. Please click here for more information.

9:15 a.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton meets with Egyptian Field Marshall Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, in Cairo, Egypt.
(CLOSED PRESS COVERAGE)

11:00 a.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton meets with employees of Flat6Lab, in Cairo, Egypt.
(POOLED PRESS COVERAGE)

12:00 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton holds a roundtable with Christian Leaders, in Cairo, Egypt.
(CAMERA SPRAY PRECEDING MEETING)

1:30 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton holds a meeting with Egyptian Women Leaders, in Cairo, Egypt.
(CAMERA SPRAY PRECEDING MEETING)

2:50 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton meets with the staff and families of Embassy Cairo, in Cairo, Egypt.
(POOLED PRESS COVERAGE)

5:40 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton participates in the Consulate General Alexandria Flag-Raising Ceremony, in Alexandria, Egypt.
(OPEN PRESS COVERAGE)

6:15 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton meets with the staff and families of Consulate General Alexandria, in Alexandria, Egypt.
(POOLED PRESS COVERAGE)

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US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the US Embassy staff at the embassy in Cairo on July 15, 2012. Clinton is visiting Egypt to meet with the nation’s newly elected president and other government and civil leaders to speak about the relationship between the United States and the new democracy. AFP PHOTO/POOL/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GettyImages)

Remarks at Meeting With Embassy Staff and Families

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
U.S. Embassy
Cairo, Egypt
July 15, 2012

SECRETARY CLINTON: Thank you very much, and thank you also for your patience. I’ve had an excellent series of meetings today and have had the opportunity to listen to and interact with a number of Egyptians that has given me new insight and a very clear sense of the great dedication that Egyptians have toward the success of this transition to a true democracy.

I want to thank Ambassador Patterson and to DCM Marc Sievers for the leadership they’ve brought to the mission at this time which is so historic. I also want to thank all of you for everything you’re doing every single day. You’re on the front lines of the democratic transition here. And I know it’s not been easy, especially for our local Egyptian staff. Even getting to and from work has been a challenge at times. But I want to thank our Egyptian and our American team here. You’ve responded just extraordinarily with real commitment and fortitude. And I’m delighted that I can thank you in person. The last time I was here, there was still a sense of excitement and energy coming from all that had happened so close by in Tahrir Square. Now, obviously, we are into the hard work, the hard, hard work of trying to be a good partner as the people of Egypt make their transition.

I especially want to thank you because last November and December into January, even though there were large demonstrations and sometimes even riots, you kept on going. Even when the air was thick with tear gas and Molotov cocktails (inaudible), you pulled together to help salvage historic books that had been burned and damaged. You donated blood to help people who’d been injured. When a mob attacked the Israeli Embassy, you stayed up all night coordinating responses and helping to resolve that very unfortunate situation. When the Egyptian judiciary took up a case against American NGOs, you made certain that our citizens were safe. You never stopped supporting and advocating for our Egyptian colleagues who were on trial and for all Egyptians working to build democracy. Whenever an American citizen got into trouble for taking part in demonstrations, you were there to protect their rights, to secure their release. I understand some of you even served Thanksgiving dinner to three young Americans who were jailed over that holiday.

So I know that it’s been a challenging year for all of you, but I particularly want to thank all the drivers, the local security guards, the diplomatic security staff, the Marine security guards, who protected this Embassy and all of you during the turmoil of the year. I want to thank the telephone operators who kept us all connected and tracked us down at any hour of day or night.

And I want to thank you for helping to monitor and report on seven rounds of voting. For the first time in Egypt’s long, legendary history, they have chosen their own leadership. But elections are just the beginning. It’s not the end of anything. Now a government must be formed, and a government that will respect the rights of all Egyptians – men and women, Muslim and Christian, wherever they live in the country.

I met with President Morsi yesterday and told him the United States stands ready to support the Egyptian people, that we are working toward an inclusive government, that we respect the right of Egyptians to build their country, but we believe strongly that universal rights must be protected. All people deserve dignity. All people deserve their freedom.

So I’m hoping that you will continue your efforts that are incredibly important, and to show the support and friendship of the American people to the Egyptian people. And I know that for many of you, you will be telling your grandchildren about this past 15 months, about what is likely to be a better future for Egypt.

So thank you for everything you are doing and that you will do, and I cannot wait to see how this incredibly important story unfolds. Thank you all very much. (Applause.)

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the US Embassy staff at the embassy in Cairo on July 15, 2012. Clinton is visiting Egypt to meet with the nation’s newly elected president and other government and civil leaders to speak about the relationship between the United States and the new democracy. AFP PHOTO/POOL/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GettyImages)

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the US Embassy staff at the embassy in Cairo on July 15, 2012. Clinton is visiting Egypt to meet with the nation’s newly elected president and other government and civil leaders to speak about the relationship between the United States and the new democracy. AFP PHOTO/POOL/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GettyImages)

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Today, at the Egyptian Ministry of Defense Hillary Clinton met with Egypt’s head of the military council,  Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi.  According to a senior state department official, Mme. Secretary spent the remainder of the day meeting with factions from Egyptian civil society.  The American Embassy hosted entrepreneurs, members of diverse religious groups, and women leaders.  As always, she met with embassy staff prior to departing Cairo, and while we have no public schedule yet, we can expect Mme. Secretary to make a stop in Alexandria for the dedication for the new consulate there before leaving Egypt for the last stop on this marathon trip – Israel.

Remarks to Flat6 Labs

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Chief of Mission Residence
Cairo, Egypt
July 15, 2012

SECRETARY CLINTON: Can I just say how excited I am at what all of you are doing, and how thrilled – thrilling it is to see young people like yourselves working on these new ideas, new concepts, new services, new products, new way of organizing. It’s so enterprising, entrepreneurial, as you would say. So thank you for Flat6, and thanks to USAID for being a partner. But mostly, thanks to all of you for having the ideas and being willing to take a risk to do this. And I will be sure to get updates about how you all are doing. And if I ever need a doctor in Egypt – (laughter) – or a game for my children or some beautiful product from somewhere in the country, there’s just so much that you’re doing that can not only be satisfying to you but change people’s lives for the better. So let’s give them a round of applause. (Applause.)

Thank you all very much. Take care.

___________________________________________________________

Remarks to Egyptian Women Leaders

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Ambassador’s Residence
Cairo, Egypt
July 15, 2012

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, first let me say how pleased I am to have this opportunity to visit with some longtime acquaintances and people I’ve known and people that I’ve met recently, and some new faces, to talk about the way forward here in Egypt. I just had a lengthy meeting with a group of Christian leaders who had many issues that they wanted to raise directly with me. And I came to Cairo in part to send a very clear message that the United States supports the rights – the universal rights – of all people.

And we support democracy, but democracy has to mean more than just elections. It has to mean that the majority will be protecting the rights of the minority. And here in Egypt, we are committed to protecting and advancing the rights of all Egyptians – men and women, Muslim and Christian. Everyone who is a citizen of Egypt deserves the same rights under the law. And I conveyed this to President Morsi in our meeting yesterday, that we’re going to look to any elected government to support inclusivity, to make sure that the talents of every Egyptian can be put to work in building a new future for this ancient and incredibly important country, and that we are also going to be looking to the government to respect the rights, and as the new constitution is written, to enshrine those rights in it.

Egyptians have sacrificed so much to get to this moment. And we think a strong, durable democracy that respects the rule of law, that protects the rights of all, is the best way forward for Egyptians to realize your aspirations and to meet your own goals for development. So today, now I have the opportunity to meet with a group of women who are active in Egypt in many different venues, on many different issues. And I’m looking forward to this conversation because I don’t think there’s any substitute to hearing firsthand what is on people’s minds and also what the United States can do to be a better partner as Egypt makes its transition to real democracy.

Thank you all very much.

 

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OK – let’s take a step to the lighter side of things on this marathon trip – her longest so far as SOS.  This picture was taken as she exited her meeting with President Morsi today, and it seems to be begging for a caption.

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Remarks With Egyptian Foreign Minister Amr

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Presidential Palace
Cairo, Egypt
July 14, 2012

FOREIGN MINISTER AMR: (Via interpreter.) I’m delighted to have Mrs. Clinton, the U.S. Secretary of State here for the first time to Egypt since the revolution. It’s a very important visit, and especially in light of the U.S.-Egyptian historic relation, which serve the interest of both countries and which go back to 40 years ago.

Today, Mrs. Clinton had a very prolonged meeting with the President, and she addressed – they addressed several issues concerning bilateral relations and also the situation in the region and both parties’ visions on these issues. With respect to these issues, the talks were amicable and friendly and frank.

Without much ado, I’ll give you the way to – the chance to speak now, and afterwards we’ll take two questions from both sides.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Thank you very much, Foreign Minister. And I want to thank you and President Morsi for a warm welcome and a very thorough conversation about a number of important issues confronting Egypt and the region.

This is, of course, a time marked by many historic firsts, and it is very clear that Egyptians are in the midst of complex negotiations about the transition, from the composition of your parliament to the writing of a new constitution to the powers of the president. Only Egyptians can answer these questions, but I have come to Cairo to reaffirm the strong support of the United States for the Egyptian people and for your democratic transition.

This afternoon, President Morsi and I began a constructive dialogue about the broad, enduring relationship between the United States and Egypt for the 21st century. We discussed the challenges ahead and how the United States and Egypt can work together in a spirit of mutual respect and mutual interests.

First, we discussed how the United States can support the Egyptian people and their aspirations and in particular the economic package outlined by President Obama to relieve up to one billion dollars in Egypt’s debt as its democratic transition moves forward. In close consultation with the United States Congress, the Obama Administration is preparing to provide budget support to help Egypt stabilize its economy and to use debt relief to foster innovation, growth, and job creation. As Egypt takes these steps to shore up your economy, we will support you with international financial institutions and other donors.

We are also focused on increasing trade, investment, and entrepreneurship to create jobs and are ready to make available $250 million in loan guarantees to Egyptian small-and-medium-sized businesses. We are sending a high-level delegation of American businesses in early September to explore new investment and trade opportunities, and we will be creating the U.S.-Egypt Enterprise Fund. We’ll launch that fund with $60 million. We have prominent Egyptian and American business leaders who will run it. It is modeled on what we have done that has worked in other countries before.

Second, the President and I discussed the importance of keeping Egypt’s democratic transition moving forward, and I commended him on his pledge to serve all Egyptians, including women and minorities and to protect the rights of all Egyptians. President Morsi made clear that he understands the success of his presidency and, indeed, of Egypt’s democratic transition depends on building consensus across the Egyptian political spectrum, to work on a new constitution at parliament, to protect civil society, to draft a new constitution that will be respected by all, and to assert the full authority of the presidency.

And thirdly, we discussed Egypt’s role as a leader in the region. I commended the President for going to the African Union Summit to reassert Egyptian leadership in Africa and emphasized the importance of upholding Egypt’s international agreements. More than three decades ago, Egypt and Israel signed a treaty that has allowed a generation to grow up without knowing war. And on this foundation, we will work together to build a just, comprehensive, regional peace in the Middle East based on two states for two people with peace, security, and dignity for all.

We believe America’s shared strategic interest with Egypt far outnumber our differences. And we know that Egypt’s future is up to the Egyptian people, but we want to be a good partner. We want to support the democracy that has been achieved by the courage and sacrifice of the Egyptian people and to see a future of great potential be realized for the nearly 90 million people of Egypt who are expecting that to occur.
Thank you very much.

QUESTION: (Via interpreter.) Mohamad Soliman from Nile News. You say that the U.S. supports the democratic transition in Egypt, but some believe that some statements made by U.S. officials have a negative impact on efforts to reach consensus among the various Egyptian parties. What’s your comment to that?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, we do support the democratic transition, but we know that it is for Egyptians to decide your way forward. And what we have tried to do, President Obama and I, is to stress democracy is hard. We have been at this for more than 236 years, and it requires dialogue and compromise and real politics. So we are encouraged, and we want to be helpful, but we know that it is not for the United States to decide. It is for the Egyptian people to decide, and we will continue to support the Egyptian people making these decisions in the best way that we can.

MS. NULAND: On the U.S. side, Reuters, Arshad Mohammed, please.

QUESTION: Secretary Clinton, do you regret in retrospect that successive American administrations supported the Mubarak government, which for so many years repressed and sought to marginalize the Muslim Brotherhood, including at times imprisoning President Morsi, whom you just met? And secondly, did President Morsi raise with you the case of Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman, the cleric who is in prison in the United States? And if so, what was your response?

SECRETARY CLINTON: The answer to the second question is no.

Answer to the first question is we worked with the government of the country at the time. We work with governments around the world. We agree with some of them; we disagree with others of them. We were consistent in promoting human rights and speaking out for an end to the emergency law, an end to political prisoners being detained. So I think you have to put this in context.

The United States has relations with every nation in the world, and we stand for democracy and human rights, but it’s not always easy for countries to transition from authoritarian regimes to democratic ones. Sometimes it’s very bloody, with great loss. Egypt took a different path, and we now are doing all we can to support the democratically elected government and to help make it a success in delivering results for the people of Egypt.

QUESTION: (Via interpreter.) It’s two questions. And first one concerns have – has the U.S. or yourself taken any steps to bring President Morsi and Netanyahu together, especially that some people raise the possibility of amending some of the provisions of the peace treaty? And the second question concerns the U.S. position vis-a-vis the Palestinian reconciliation efforts. And there’s an understanding that the U.S. is opposed to that and also opposed to the Palestinians turning to the United Nations. So the question is if you were in President – in the Palestinian President’s shoes, what exactly would you do with regard to this issue?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, we – as to the first question, it is up to the two nations and the President and the Prime Minister to make their own scheduling plans. We have done nothing. That’s not our role; that would not be appropriate. Obviously, we think it’s important for all the nations in the region to try to maintain peace and stability, especially with so many economic challenges facing the region. And we certainly support the continuation of the peace agreement, because we think, as I said, it has brought great benefits to Egypt and will continue to do so, enabling the President to focus on the economic conditions and the internal political situation here in the country.

And as to your second question, I’m in very close communication with President Abbas. I met with him last Friday in Paris. Our goal is to help bring about the two-state solution. And we know that it can only happen if there is a negotiation between the Israelis and the Palestinians, and that can only happen if all Palestinians are committed to seeking a political resolution and renouncing violence.

So reconciliation is up to the Palestinians, and I commend the Egyptian Government for all the work that Egypt has done. But at the end of the day, the factions of the Palestinians themselves have to determine whether they are committed to a negotiation that will result in a state which they deserve and which the Palestinian people have every reason to expect, or whether there will be diversions and other actions that do not promote that. And I personally believe, having watched this closely now for more than 20 years, that it’s imperative there be a negotiated resolution. And I will continue to do everything I can to bring that about.

FOREIGN MINISTER AMR: (Via interpreter.) I would like to add something about the peace treaty. Mr. President has repeatedly reaffirmed, and on all occasions, that Egypt continues to respect all treaties signed as long as the other party to the treaty respects the treaty itself. And today, he once again reiterated this issue and also reiterated that Egypt’s understanding of peace is that it should be comprehensive, exactly as stipulated in the treaty itself. And this also includes the Palestinians, of course, and its right to – their right have their own state on the land that was – the pre June 4th, 1967 borders with Jerusalem as its capital.

MS. NULAND: (Inaudible) CNN, Elise Labott, please.

QUESTION: Thank you, Madam Secretary. You spoke last week about the parties needing to – in Egypt – needing to get together and settle their political differences. And today you spoke about President Morsi needing to assert the full authority of his office. But I’m wondering if you’re equating the SCAF, which seems to have undemocratically overstayed its welcome in the political sphere, with an elected president and parliament that you yourself said was brought to office in a free and fair election. I mean, is there a moral equivalence there, or should the SCAF be kind of pulling back now? Thank you.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, again, Elise, this is first and foremost a question for the Egyptian people. But the United States supports the full transition to civilian rule with all that entails. And we have commended the SCAF for representing the Egyptian people in the revolution, as compared to what we’re seeing in Syria, which is the military murdering their own people. The SCAF here protected the Egyptian nation, and we commend them for overseeing a free, fair election process. But there is more work ahead, and I think the issues around the parliament, the constitution have to be resolved between and among Egyptians. I will look forward to discussing these issues tomorrow with Field Marshal Tantawi and in working to support the military’s return to a purely national security role.

And I would only add that this is not an uncommon issue in these transitions. If you look at Latin America, you look at Asia, you look at the former Soviet Union, other countries have gone through these transitions, especially from authoritarian, military-dominated rule. So I am confident that the Egyptian people, acting in the interest of all the people, can resolve these questions themselves.

QUESTION: (Off-mike.)

MS. NULAND: Translation please.

INTERPRETER: Yes.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Can she translate my answer, please?

INTERPRETER: (In Arabic.)

QUESTION: (Off mike.)

QUESTION: (Off mike.)

QUESTION: (Off mike.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: You know, this is great evidence of a free press, which is part of democracy. Thank you.

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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton peaks with Egypt’s Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr at the Foreign Ministry in Cairo

Public Schedule for July 14, 2012

Public Schedule

Washington, DC
July 14, 2012

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
PUBLIC SCHEDULE
SATURDAY JULY 14, 2012

SECRETARY HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON

Secretary Clinton is on foreign travel in Cairo, Egypt. The Secretary is accompanied by Acting Assistant Secretary Jones, Assistant Secretary Posner, National Security Council Senior Director for the Middle East and North Africa Steve Simon, Spokesperson Nuland, Director Sullivan, and VADM Harry B. Harris, Jr., JCS. Please click here for more information.

5:00 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton meets with Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, in Cairo, Egypt.
(CAMERA SPRAY PRECEDING MEETING)

6:10 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton holds a joint press availability with Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr, in Cairo, Egypt.
(OPEN PRESS COVERAGE)

7:25 p.m. LOCAL Secretary Clinton participates in a working dinner with Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr, in Cairo, Egypt.
(CAMERA SPRAY AT THE TOP)

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