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Posts Tagged ‘Henry Kissinger’

The best fireworks occurred in the last half hour. Emphasis here is mine.

Transcript courtesy of the New York Times.

This came early, but I just had to say ….

SANDERS: You once had a pension. Those jobs, in many cases, are now gone. They’re off.

True, but a lot of us have 401Ks and 403Bs in place of the pensions, making all of us a little bit Wall St.  as it were.  The argument should be against the GOP privatizing Social Security similarly.  Don’t demonize where I now everything I worked for. I need Wall St. to be healthy, but fair, clean, and legit.

WOODRUFF: Welcome back to the Democratic presidential debate. Before we

return to our questions, we have a follow-up question from our Facebook group.

And it is to Senator Sanders

Senator, it comes from Bill Corfield. He is a 55-year-old musician from Troy,

Ohio. And he asks: “Are there any areas of government you would like to

reduce?”

SANDERS: Hey, I’m in the United States Senate, and anyone who doesn’t think

that there is an enormous amount of waste and inefficiency and bureaucracy

throughout government would be very, very mistaken.

I believe in government, but I believe in efficient government, not wasteful

government.

IFILL: How about you, Senator Clinton — Secretary Clinton?

CLINTON: Absolutely. And, you know, there are a number of programs that I

think are duplicative and redundant and not producing the results that people

deserve. There are a lot of training programs and education programs that I think

can be streamlined and put into a much better format so that if we do continue

them they can be more useful, in public schools, community colleges, and

colleges and universities.

I would like to take a hard look at every part of the federal government and really

do the kind of analysis that would rebuild some confidence in people that we’re

taking a hard look about what we have, you know, and what we don’t need

anymore. And that’s what I intend to do.

SANDERS: If I could just answer that, we have also got to take a look at the

waste and inefficiencies in the Department of Defense, which is the one major

agency of government that has not been able to be audited. And I have the

feeling you’re going to find a lot of cost overruns there and a lot of waste and

duplicative activities.

Format did not permit Hillary to respond further.  That was the cut-off. Hillary was not allowed another word here. But I would point out that Hillary initiated the first-ever such analytical process to streamline the State Department, the QDDR, as Secretary of State, and certainly will apply that model to all government agencies as POTUS. She has already done this and knows how!  I wish she could have talked about that.

CLINTON: But I want to — I want to follow up on something having

to do with leadership, because, you know, today Senator Sanders said that

President Obama failed the presidential leadership test. And this is not the first

time that he has criticized President Obama. In the past he has called him weak.

He has called him a disappointment.

He wrote a forward for a book that basically argued voters should have buyers’

remorse when it comes to President Obama’s leadership and legacy.

And I just couldn’t agree — disagree more with those kinds of comments. You

know, from my perspective, maybe because I understand what President Obama

inherited, not only the worst financial crisis but the antipathy of the Republicans

in Congress, I don’t think he gets the credit he deserves for being a president…

(APPLAUSE)

CLINTON: … who got us out of that…

(APPLAUSE)

CLINTON: … put us on firm ground, and has sent us into the future. And it is a —

the kind of criticism that we’ve heard from Senator Sanders about our president I

expect from Republicans. I do not expect from someone running for the

Democratic nomination to succeed President Obama.
SANDERS: That is…
(APPLAUSE)

SANDERS: Madam Secretary, that is a low blow.

(As if never in this campaign cycle has he ever delivered a low blow.)

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(Hillary gives him Carrie-at-the-Prom face via Sissy Spacek.)

I have worked with President Obama for the last seven years.

Note to Senator Sanders: That is very unstable territory.

When President Obama came into office we were losing 800,000 jobs a month, 800,000

jobs a month.

We had a $1.4 trillion

deficit. And the world’s financial system is on the verge of collapse.

As a result of his efforts and the efforts of Joe Biden against unprecedented, I

was there in the Senate, unprecedented Republican obstructionism, we have

made enormous progress.

(APPLAUSE)

SANDERS: But you know what? Last I heard we lived in a democratic society.

Last I heard, a United States senator had the right to disagree with the president,

including a president who has done such an extraordinary job.

So I have voiced criticisms. You’re right. Maybe you haven’t. I have. But I think to

suggest that I have voiced criticism, this blurb that you talk about, you know what

the blurb said? The blurb said that the next president of the United States has got

to be aggressive in bringing people into the political process.

That’s what I said. That is what I believe.

(APPLAUSE)

SANDERS: President Obama and I are friends.

As you know, he came to

Vermont to campaign for me when he was a senator. I have worked for his re-

election. His first election and his re-election.

But I think it is really unfair to suggest that I have not been supportive of the

president. I have been a strong ally with him on virtually every issue. Do senators

have the right to disagree with the president? Have you ever disagreed with a

president? I suspect you may have.

(APPLAUSE)

CLINTON: You know, Senator, what I am concerned about, is not disagreement

on issues, saying that this is what I would rather do, I don’t agree with the

president on that, calling the president weak, calling him a disappointment,

calling several times that he should have a primary opponent when he ran for re-

election in 2012, you know, I think that goes further than saying we have our

disagreements.

As a senator, yes, I was a senator. I understand we can disagree on the path

forward. But those kinds of personal assessments and charges are ones that I

find particularly troubling.

IFILL: Senator, if you would like respond to — you may respond to that but it is

time for closing statements and you can use your time for closing statements to

dpolicies he carried o that.

SANDERS: Well, one of us ran against Barack Obama. I was not that candidate.

No he was not – in 2008, when Obama was a senator. That was when HIllary ran against Obama as a fellow senator.  The election when Bernie planned to primary President Obama was in 2012, when he was, you know,  president.

SANDERS: Where the secretary and I have a very profound difference, in the

last debate — and I believe in her book — very good book, by the way — in her

book and in this last debate, she talked about getting the approval or the support

or the mentoring of Henry Kissinger. Now, I find it rather amazing, because I

happen to believe that Henry Kissinger was one of the most destructive

secretaries of state in the modern history of this country.

(APPLAUSE)

I am proud to say that Henry Kissinger is not my friend. I will not take advice from

Henry Kissinger. And in fact, Kissinger’s actions in Cambodia, when the United

States bombed that country, overthrew Prince Sihanouk, created the instability

for Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge to come in, who then butchered some 3 million

innocent people, one of the worst genocides in the history of the world. So count

me in as somebody who will not be listening to Henry Kissinger.

(APPLAUSE)

IFILL: Secretary Clinton? CLINTON: Well, I know journalists have asked who

you do listen to on foreign policy, and we have yet to know who that is.

SANDERS: Well, it ain’t Henry Kissinger. That’s for sure.

CLINTON: That’s fine. That’s fine.

(LAUGHTER)

You know, I listen to a wide variety of voices that have expertise in various areas.

I think it is fair to say, whatever the complaints that you want to make about him

are, that with respect to China, one of the most challenging relationships we

have, his opening up China and his ongoing relationships with the leaders of

China is an incredibly useful relationship for the United States of America.

(APPLAUSE)

So if we want to pick and choose — and I certainly do — people I listen to, people

I don’t listen to, people I listen to for certain areas, then I think we have to be fair

and look at the entire world, because it’s a big, complicated world out there.

By the way, Bernie, do not insult us. We do know who Mossadegh was.  I wonder how many of your millennials know who Henry Kissinger is.  I know Hillary’s millennials do.  Many of us remember his service and have issues with some policies he carried out under Nixon, but here’s a reminder:  He was secretary of state, not secretary of defense. Blaming Kissinger for bombings in Cambodia is like blaming Hillary for bombings  – anywhere – while she was secretary of state – a diplomatic post.

Secretary Clinton Accepts Freedom Award in Berlin for the American People

Henry Kissinger, left, former U.S. Secretary of State, hands over the Freedom Award " in recognition of their fight for democracy and liberty" for the American People to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, right, during the Freedom Awards Ceremony of the Atlantic Council in Berlin, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer)

Henry Kissinger, left, former U.S. Secretary of State, hands over the Freedom Award ” in recognition of their fight for democracy and liberty” for the American People to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, right, during the Freedom Awards Ceremony of the Atlantic Council in Berlin, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer)

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Hillary Clinton reviews Henry Kissinger’s ‘World Order’

Hillary Rodham Clinton was the 67th secretary of state.

When Americans look around the world today, we see one crisis after another. Russian aggression in Ukraine, extremism and chaos in Iraq and Syria, a deadly epidemic in West Africa, escalating territorial tensions in the East and South China seas, a global economy that still isn’t producing enough growth or shared prosperity — the liberal international order that the United States has worked for generations to build and defend seems to be under pressure from every quarter. It’s no wonder so many Americans express uncertainty and even fear about our role and our future in the world.

In his new book, “World Order,” Henry Kissinger explains the historic scope of this challenge. His analysis, despite some differences over specific policies, largely fits with the broad strategy behind the Obama administration’s effort over the past six years to build a global architecture of security and cooperation for the 21st century.

During the Cold War, America’s bipartisan commitment to protecting and expanding a community of nations devoted to freedom, market economies and cooperation eventually proved successful for us and the world. Kissinger’s summary of that vision sounds pertinent today: “an inexorably expanding cooperative order of states observing common rules and norms, embracing liberal economic systems, forswearing territorial conquest, respecting national sovereignty, and adopting participatory and democratic systems of governance.”

Read more >>>>

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Hillary Clinton was back at the State Department today to join predecessors Henry Kissinger, James Baker, Madeleine Albright, and Colin Powell as well as her successor, John Kerry, for a ceremonial ground-breaking.  The U.S. Diplomacy Center, located near the Harry S. Truman Building, will be a museum and education center that will ‘demonstrate the ways in which diplomacy matters now and has mattered throughout American history

What an amazing lineup of exceptional leaders and public servants!

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Right now, this is all I have.  If a transcript comes through, I will add it here.

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We have known for weeks that Hillary Clinton would be in Los Angeles next Wednesday to receive the Warren Christopher Public Service Award from the Pacific Council on International Relations.   We did not know, however,  that she would be honored last night at the Atlantic Council Awards dinner.

Henry Kissinger presented her with the council’s Distinguished Leadership Award with a quip about “at least four” secretaries of state who went on to become president.*  Apparently unfazed, Hillary responded, “When I became secretary of state, I spent a lot of time thinking about my illustrious predecessors – not primarily the ones who went on to become president.”

As secretary of state,  Hillary often expressed her deep admiration for several of those predecessors  While it has always seemed that George Marshall  topped her list, we have seen a strong, cordial relationship develop between Hillary and Henry over the years as the photos attest.  If  the text of her remarks are released, I will add them here.

Bill Clinton presented an award to Tony Bennett.  Also honored at the event was NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen.

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Here is a partial account from the Atlantic Council website.  There are additional photos there as well.

Distinguished Leadership Awards Offers Perfect Mix of Substance and Style

Former US President Bill Clinton presented the next award via video address for Distinguished Artistic Leaership to legendary performer and humanitarian Tony Bennett. President Clinton praised Bennett for his illustrious musical career, but also his significant work as an advocate and humanitarian. “As long as I’ve known him,” said President Clinton, “he has truly been a citizen of the world: an extraordinary individual who served his country in World War II, marched with Dr. Martin Luther King in Selma in 1965, and has devoted his generous spirit to charitable causes all across the globe.”

The final award for Distinguished International Leadership was presented to former First Lady, US Senator, and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Secretary Clinton was presented with video tributes by President of Malawi Joyce Banda and internationally-renowned political activist Aung San Suu Kyi. She was introduced in person by former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor Dr. Henry Kissinger. Secretary Clinton accepted her award and delivered brief remarks on the state of the transatlantic alliance and the three primary challenges facing NATO in the coming decades: energy security, trade cooperation, and conflict readiness. Secretary Clinton seized the opportunity to endorse a comprehensive transatlantic trade agreement, and to stress that all members of NATO must redouble their efforts to promote transatlantic values around the world. “We cannot afford to let the greatest alliance in history slide into military irrelevance,” she urged.

Read more >>>>

Click on the playlist to find Hillary’s speech.  (Wow!  Did I ever hit the nail on the head with George Marshal!  I did not even know what was in this speech!)

*In case you wondered, it was six secretaries of state who went on to become president.  The last was James Buchanan.

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If you voted in this poll last week, you might be interested to know that Hillary won impressively and now is being pitted against Thomas Jefferson. Scroll down to see the latest poll.

Presidential Madness (Round 2): Favorite modern secretary of state

By NCC Staff | National Constitution Center

Here are the six nominees for best modern secretary of state, along with a quick bio of their time in office:

1. George C. Marshall. Served 1947 – 1949. As Harry Truman’s secretary of state, Marshall’s Plan rebuilt Europe after World War II, and he was later awarded a Nobel Prize for his efforts.

2. Henry Kissinger. Served 1973 – 1977. The high-profile secretary for Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, Kissinger was a career diplomat who pioneered the policy of detente with the Soviet Union.

3. George P. Shultz. Served 1982 – 1989. Only one of two people to serve in four different cabinet positions, Shultz led the State Department for most of the Reagan era.

4. Madeleine Albright. Served 1997 – 2001. The first woman to serve as secretary, Albright played an important role in the Clinton administration.

5. Condoleezza Rice. Served 2005 – 2009. A Shultz protégé, Rice first served as President George W. Bush’s national security adviser before becoming secretary of state.

6. Hillary Clinton. Served 2009 – 2013. The former first lady served in the Senate and then became the most-traveled secretary ever as part of the Obama administration.

Read more >>>>

Here is the less than fair and balanced poll pitting Hillary (the “modern” winner) against Thomas Jefferson (the “historical winner). It is never fair to pit an historical figure against one whose history is not complete. For what it is worth, here is that poll.

Presidential Madness (Round 9): Pick the best secretary of state ever!

At Constitution Daily, madness doesn’t just apply to the NCAA—it’s also an awesome excuse to give the bracket treatment to the executive branch of government. This year, it’s all about the presidential Cabinet.

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Round 9: Best secretary of state ever!

In earlier voting, our readers chose the best historical and modern secretaries of state from a star-studded field of diplomats.

In the historical division, Thomas Jefferson edged out James Madison in the fight between the Founding Fathers. William Seward and John Quincy Adams were also contenders in a four-way battle of big historical names.

In the modern division, Hillary Clinton had an easier time, taking an impressive 46 percent of the vote in defeating Henry Kissinger, George Marshall and Condoleeza Rice.

Click here to read more and vote >>>>

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Presidential Madness (Round 2): Favorite modern secretary of state

By NCC Staff | National Constitution Center

Here are the six nominees for best modern secretary of state, along with a quick bio of their time in office:

1. George C. Marshall. Served 1947 – 1949. As Harry Truman’s secretary of state, Marshall’s Plan rebuilt Europe after World War II, and he was later awarded a Nobel Prize for his efforts.

2. Henry Kissinger. Served 1973 – 1977. The high-profile secretary for Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, Kissinger was a career diplomat who pioneered the policy of detente with the Soviet Union.

3. George P. Shultz. Served 1982 – 1989. Only one of two people to serve in four different cabinet positions, Shultz led the State Department for most of the Reagan era.

4. Madeleine Albright. Served 1997 – 2001. The first woman to serve as secretary, Albright played an important role in the Clinton administration.

5. Condoleezza Rice. Served 2005 – 2009. A Shultz protégé, Rice first served as President George W. Bush’s national security adviser before becoming secretary of state.

6. Hillary Clinton. Served 2009 – 2013. The former first lady served in the Senate and then became the most-traveled secretary ever as part of the Obama administration.

Pick your favorite in our poll below, and check back each day to see a new March Cabinet Madness vote!

Note: If you can’t see the poll below, use this link: http://poll.fm/45otg

Read more >>>>

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New York Magazine has an article about our Hillary.

Hillary Clinton on Kissinger, Albright and Women

By

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 1:  (AFP OUT) U.S. President Barack Obama stands after addressing the nation on TV from the East Room of the White House to make a televised statement May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC.  Bin Laden has been killed near Islamabad, Pakistan almost a decade after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and his body is in possession of the United States. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski-Pool/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Barack Obama;

Departing Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently shared some of the wisdom gleaned from twenty years in the White House with Mitt Romney’s favorite magazine, The Economist. Clinton has visited 95 countries and traveled 730,000 miles since joining Obama’s cabinet, and Kirsten Gillibrand recently told BuzzFeed that she’ll be “one of the first to ask Hillary to run in 2016.” In the lengthy interview, Clinton got kind of whimsical about the past and talked about signing a treaty she’d never heard about.

Some of the choice bits:

Click here to read them!!!!

 

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