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Hillary was back in the state where she was born and raised while the indictment dominated the news along with the surprise guilty plea of former Trump staffer, George Papadopoulos. Hillary promised a great chapter on Russia. Indeed, it is an important segment in her book.


On the heels of the federal indictment of President Donald Trump‘s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, Hillary Clinton made the rounds of the Chicago area Monday in support of her new book that examines the historic election.

“I have a great chapter about Russia in here,” Clinton told members of the media as she signed copies of her book “What Happened” at the Book Stall in Winnetka. It was the only public comment Clinton made during her suburban visit regarding the latest events surrounding Manafort.

Read more and see more pics and video with John West in it >>>>

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After her Cincinnati rally with Tim Kaine today, Hillary boarded Hill Force One and took questions from her traveling press corps while in flight to Hampton, Illinois for the 49th Annual Salute to Labor there.  Look for Hillary around the 20 minute mark.

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Here is the message Hillary would like to share on Labor Day.

On Labor Day, we celebrate American workers and all that the organized labor movement has done for us — from bringing us a 40-hour work week, the weekend, and overtime pay to securing limits on child labor. Hillary’s got plans to strengthen organized labor and help workers around America enjoy the benefits of good-paying jobs — including a living wage, the ability to raise a family, the flexibility to balance work and life, and a sense of dignity and pride in one’s work. You can dive into the details below, but here’s the gist:

  • Hillary will increase access to work training, apprenticeships, and entrepreneurial opportunity, invest in new, good-paying jobs, and create incentives for those jobs to remain in America.
  • Hillary will fight for higher and fairer pay overall, ranging from raising the minimum wage to encouraging profit-sharing by employers.
  • Hillary will fight for policies that support workers’ financial and logistical needs at every stage of life, giving Employer Law Advice so those who are raising a family or preparing to retire can do so without any worries.

It’s important to remember that while Hillary fights to make life better for workers, Donald Trump and Mike Pence are doing the opposite: Trump wants to eliminate the federal minimum wage, made Trump-branded products overseas, stiffs the small business owners and contractors who work with him, and has hired union-busting firms to stop his own workers from organizing. Mike Pence pushed to undermine Social Security, and both Trump and Pence support so-called “right to work” laws which make it much harder for workers to bargain for better salaries.

As the granddaughter of a factory worker and the daughter of a small business owner, Hillary knows that our workers have the right to fair wages, safe working conditions, and reasonable hours. Here’s the rundown of what Hillary’s got planned once she’s president:

Protecting American workers

Hillary has specific plans for job creation and economic policies that will increase the number of good-paying jobs and trained workers here in the United States while protecting workers from exploitation and outsourcing. In fact, she plans to make the largest investment in good-paying jobs since World War II.

  • In her first 100 days, Hillary will invest over $275 billion to spur the creation of good-paying jobs in infrastructure, and invest further in clean energy, research and technology, manufacturing, and the small business sector.
  • She’ll help small businesses create good-paying jobs by cutting red tape, providing tax relief and increasing access to capital.
  • She’ll invest in high-quality training, apprenticeships, and skill-building for all workers, including free community college and improved access to vocational education.
  • She’ll pull back tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas, and reject global trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership that do not meet a high bar of creating good-paying jobs and raising pay.

Higher and fairer pay

Workers should be paid fairly for the time they put in on the job, and Hillary will fight for employees to take home every dollar they worked for.

  • Hillary supports a federal $12 minimum wage, and supports prevailing wage laws and the “Fight for $15” where economically feasible.
  • She’ll support collective bargaining rights for unions and make it easier for workers to choose to join a union and bargain for better wages and benefits.
  • She’ll reward companies that share profits with their workers by awarding a two-year tax credit equal to 15% of the profits they share (with a higher credit for small businesses).
  • She’ll fight for equal pay for women, especially women of color (the most frequent victims of the gender pay gap), including through passage of the Paycheck Fairness Act (which she introduced three times as a senator).

Work-life balance: a fairer, more flexible workplace

Jobs should provide not only wages, but humane working conditions, reasonable hours, and a sense of dignity and pride. 21st-century families face unique challenges — more dual-income families, more female heads of household as breadwinners, and a health care system that still places undue burdens on family caregivers (a quarter of American women return to work just 10 days after having a child). In response:

  • Hillary will continue the fight for paid family and medical leave, with a goal of guaranteeing 12 weeks of paid leave to care for any family member (not just a newborn).
  • She will work towards universally affordable childcare that caps fees at 10% of a family’s income.
  • She will defend and expand Social Security, especially for widows and those who took time out of the workforce to care for family members, and fight pension cuts and other attempts to undermine retirement benefits.

Whether they report to a factory or a classroom, work at computers or behind cash registers, or make careers of caregiving and social service, our economy — and our families — depend on American workers. Their dedication deserves all the appreciation and gratitude in the world — and they deserve to be properly compensated for it. Hillary has detailed plans to help labor and working families, and you wonks are the best at helping people understand those fine details! Share her plans and start as many conversations as you can.

In the Quad Cities, Clinton Champions America’s Labor Unions and An Economy That Works for Everyone

At the 49th Annual Salute to Labor Picnic in Hampton, Illinois on Monday, Hillary Clinton reiterated her belief that we are stronger together, and explained why America’s labor unions reflect that. Labor unions are also crucial to Clinton’s plan to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, she said, given their fights for fair wages and safe working conditions that built the world’s largest middle class. Unlike Donald Trump, who led a union-busting campaign against his employees and said he thinks wages are too high, Clinton will make sure unions always have a seat at the table and a champion in the White House. Clinton said, “I am going to say no to attacks on unions, I am going to say no to rolling back collective bargaining, I am going to say no to unfair trade deals like the TPP […] But I will say yes to the American dream. And here’s what I believe. The American dream is big enough for all of us. If we build it, we will expand it and create more opportunities. And as we run this campaign on issues, our most important goal is getting the economy to work for everybody.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello! Wow, thank you all. Thank you. Thank you so much. And it’s wonderful to be back. I had such a good time last year, I said, ‘Put that back on my calendar for Labor Day. I want to be on the banks of the Mississippi with friends from Illinois and Iowa, talking about how we’re going to make this economy work for everybody, not just those at the top.’ And it gives me such a great sense of real privilege and honor to be up on this stage with the people you see before you, starting with my friend and former colleague, the great senator from Illinois, Dick Durbin, who has been – in so many ways the conscience of the United States Senate. You heard him say he comes from a union family, he knows what hard work is. He stands up every day in that Senate – I hope you get a chance to watch him on CSPAN some time, because he carries such passion and conviction in his voice about everything that he’s fighting for. So thanks to our friends from Illinois for sending Dick Durbin to the Senate for all the years – and for however long he wants to be there.

And please be sure he is joined by Tammy Duckworth as your next senator. Dick reminded me that I endorsed Tammy here last year. I was looking for the right occasion to do that, and I figured right here in her state would be the perfect opportunity. I just can’t tell you how much I admire this brave woman. And she’s going to bring so much to the Senate, to our national debate about issues that are critical to America’s future. So please do everything you can to make sure that Tammy is in the Senate.

And let me also recognize and thank your congresswoman, Cheri Bustos. Thank you. Cheri has already made a great impression in the Congress, and she is working hard every day. She’s another keeper. She’s somebody who will only do more and more as she is there longer and has the chance to really make things happen for her constituents.

I also want to recognize my friend, Congressman Dave Loebsack from across the river who was here earlier. I don’t think I need to remind everybody from Iowa, but please turn out and vote not only for Dave, but vote for Democrats. Vote for Patty Judge for Senate. Vote for other Democrats for Congress.

And it’s a thrill to be here with three great union leaders, people who I admire and really appreciate the chance to work with and look forward to working with as president. The UAW president, international, Dennis Williams; IBEW international president, Lonnie Stevenson; and of course, president of the NEA, for the educators, Lily Eskelsen. Now, each of these leaders are pretty special people, and I think you know, Doug was pretty happy that they’re here. He told me, ‘We’ve got three international presidents here.’ And I said, ‘Knowing these three, they’re happy to be here.’ This is not some kind of Labor Day obligation; they are with their members, they’re working on behalf not only of those in the union, but we know – it was just proven again last week – that unions not only raise incomes and provide benefits for union members, but because of unions, everybody is better off. And that’s a message I’m going to talk about every single day in this campaign.

Now, this is such a beautiful day, and you all came out here to celebrate Labor Day with all of us. And I am thrilled that I have a chance to just say a few words.

I really believe we are stronger together. That was the theme of our convention. And coming out tomorrow, Tim Kaine and I have a book called ‘Stronger Together,’ and – I’ll tell you why we did this book. I think if you run for president, you ought to tell people what you want to do. Right? And what I’ve tried to do in this book – and it’s so great having Senator Kaine by my side now – is to lay out a blueprint for America’s future. How are we going to get more good jobs, infrastructure jobs, advanced manufacturing jobs, clean renewable energy jobs? How are we going to make sure that the economy not only is growing and producing more jobs with rising incomes, but is being fair so that people are treated fairly? That’s why we support raising the national minimum wage so that you’re not living in poverty when you work full-time.

My opponent thinks wages are too high. I don’t know who he talks to – but he actually says that and he doesn’t believe in raising the national minimum wage. I also believe in doing more to support small businesses. My dad was a small businessman; I believe that we need to do everything we can to help small businesses succeed.

Tim Kaine and I were together in Cleveland earlier; we talked about that. Tim’s dad ran a union shop, ironworkers, and he’s proud of that, that he had a small business father who ran a union shop and employed union workers, providing good products. I also believe that we have got to finally guarantee equal pay for women’s work. And that’s because I believe in fairness. I don’t want to see anybody treated unfairly and discriminated against. I don’t care who you are. If you’re willing to work and do your part, you should be able to get ahead and stay ahead. That is the basic bargain of America.

So if you look at this book, which I hope you will, it stands in stark contrast to Donald Trump. He says, ‘I alone can fix it.’ Now, the folks I have met during this campaign, and for many years before, know that we have challenges, know we’ve got to come together, and believe we have to work together to fix what our problems are. That’s my view. I want us to bring people together just the way unions do. Just the way people and communities do. And here in the Quad cities, and across the country, we can see proof every day that we have to come together to meet our challenges.

So I’m going to continue to emphasize that we want to be the uniters in this campaign. We believe that America is already great and that we can become greater if we do our part. When somebody says, ‘I alone can fix it,’ think of the people he’s leaving out. Everybody else. Leaving out our troops on the front lines, leaving out firefighters and police officers who run toward danger, leaving out teachers and educators who do their best to change children’s lives, leaving out everybody else. That is his campaign in a nutshell. And what we’ve got to do in the next 63 days is to present the vision of America we believe in.

So we’re going to continue to say, we’re stronger together, we’re going to work together, we’re going to run a campaign of issues, not insults. And we are going to be absolutely strong in our support for unions. Because we know nobody gets through life alone. Unions helped build the largest middle-class in the history of the world, in our country. They fought for fair wages, safe working conditions, they’ve helped so many people get on that rung to the middle class, and their kids, like Dick Durbin, go even higher. So I am going to say no to attacks on unions, I am going to say no to rolling back collective bargaining, I am going to say no to unfair trade deals like the TPP, I’m going to say no to pension cuts that deny you the secure retirement that you have worked for, and I’m going to say no to Right to Work. It’s not right for workers, and it’s not right for America.

But I will say yes to the American dream. And here’s what I believe. The American dream is big enough for all of us. If we build it, we will expand it and create more opportunities. And as we run this campaign on issues, our most important goal is getting the economy to work for everybody. There’s nothing more important. And how do you do that? By creating more jobs. And what are some of the areas that I think we can really emphasize? Infrastructure: our roads, our bridges, our tunnels, our ports, our airports. Also, what we can’t see – our water systems – our sewer systems. We also need a new electric grid, a modern electric grid, to be able to take and distribute clean renewable energy. I have a goal for us to install a half a billion more solar panels by the end of my first term. It takes a lot of – a lot of jobs, a lot of people working to do that. And then enough clean energy to power every home by the end of my second term.

I also want to finish the work of broadband interconnectivity. We have places in our country that still have dialup. We have places where kids can’t do the homework assignments their teachers give them because they don’t have access to the internet. That is so unfair. Think of all the jobs we’ll create when we finish that off.

And then let’s look at advanced manufacturing. I believe we can compete with anybody if we put our minds to it, and I’m going to have a manufacturing renaissance policy – that will put people to work. I am so proud that Dennis and Lonnie are here because they have been doing so much to really create the new industries in autos and what the IBW does in so many important areas of our economy. I want to be your partner.

And I think it’s especially important to recognize that when the chips were down and the auto industry was on its back, President Obama did the right thing. He saved the American auto industry. I supported him then, and I support him just as strongly now. The American auto industry just had the best year it has had in a long time, and that was because of the teamwork and the partnership that we had between the companies, between the union, and because the President of the United States knew we had to save the auto industry. Donald Trump basically said he didn’t care, didn’t matter to him; just shows you how he doesn’t understand or care about the real jobs that put bread on the table and give people a sense of purpose and dignity.

Well, you won’t have to look far to find me in the Oval Office if I’m fortunate enough to be your president to do everything I can every single day to create more jobs, to save jobs, to bring jobs back from overseas. And if you contrast that with Trump, his track record – his track record is just the opposite. He actually hired a union-busting firm for one of his hotels in Las Vegas. He built a career out of not paying workers for the work they did. We’re talking painters, plumbers, electricians, people who thought it was a big deal working for Donald Trump, one of his resorts, his casinos. He stiffed them. He stiffed small businesses.

Like I said, my Dad was a small businessman. He printed drapery fabrics. He’d get an order, he’d buy the material, he’d get the silkscreens made. I would go sometimes to help him in his print plant. He’d have these long tables. The fabric would be laid out. You would take the silkscreen, you’d put it down, you’d pour the paint in, you’d take the squeegee, you’d push it across, you’d lift the screen up, you’d go all the way down, get on the next table, all the way back. Took a lot of time. Took a lot of hard work.

When he finished, he’d load up the fabrics in his car and he’d go deliver them. I am so happy he never got a contract from Donald Trump. I don’t know what my family would have done if my Dad did business with people like Trump who has told hundreds and hundreds of small businesses – he has been sued 4,000 times for not paying the bills that he owes – if my Dad had been told, ‘Sorry. Just kidding. We’re not paying you.’ This is a man who wants to be president of the United States? This is someone who doesn’t even honor contracts?

That’s what is so dangerous about this election. When Donald Trump says what he says about the economy, you know, that he knows how to create jobs, he had six bankruptcies. In one bankruptcy alone, 1,000 people lost their jobs. The numbers add up.

He talks about wanting to protect jobs in America, but everything he makes he has made overseas. He could have made suits and ties and furniture in the United States, but, no, he made it overseas. He even hires workers from overseas, and he tells people, well, he couldn’t find Americans who wanted to work in the heat. You can’t make this stuff up, can you? It is truly unbelievable.

But what’s even worse is what he says about foreign policy. As bad as he is about our economy, he has insulted our allies, he has made common cause with dictators, he has basically endorsed Vladimir Putin and his policies. When he says, ‘I know more about ISIS than the generals,’ when he claims our armed forces are a disaster, or he insults a Gold Star family, that’s not just offensive; that’s dangerous.

And just today our intelligence professionals said there is credible evidence for them to pursue an investigation into Russia’s efforts to interfere with our election, hacking the Democratic National Committee. And when Putin was asked about it, didn’t deny it; in fact, he said it was probably a good thing it happened. And this is the person that Donald Trump praises.

We saw even more evidence last week that he is temperamentally unfit and totally unqualified to be president. In just a few hours, he managed to turn his trip to Mexico into an embarrassing international incident. I mean, just look at what happened. He got into a Twitter war with the president of Mexico. And why? Because the president of Mexico said, ‘I told him in the meeting we weren’t paying for that wall.’

So not only did Trump mess up his first international engagement, he choked. He couldn’t even bring himself to tell the president of Mexico one of his very few policy demands. I mean, he went back to Arizona and gave another hate-filled speech about rounding up and deporting 16 million people. Even some of his own advisors are having a hard time explaining that away. So he’s going to try to distract and divide. He’s going to hope that we don’t pay attention to what he has been saying for 14, 15 months, that we just tune in now these last two months, that he is somehow softening his positions, that there is really another Donald Trump out there?

Well, you’ve got to ask yourself, if you can’t even go to a friendly foreign country without getting into a fight – can this person even claim to have the temperament to be in the Oval Office and deal with real urgent crises? As I’ve said before, and I’ll say it again, a man who can be provoked by a Tweet should not be anywhere near nuclear weapons.

But we have a lot of work to do. I think every election is close and tight and tough. That’s why we have to work as hard as we can between now and when the last votes are counted, and that’s why I need your help. I want to get the economy working for everybody, not just those at the top. I want to be sure that we lead the world with strength and steadiness and that we protect America here at home and around the world. And I want to unify our country. I believe with all my heart – that every American must vote. Must vote.

I see a woman holding a sign, ‘You must vote. Please, it will make a difference.’ And then she says, ‘I am a Gold Star daughter.’ God bless you. God bless you.

I’ve spent my life fighting for kids and families. I don’t give up. I don’t quit. When we didn’t get healthcare reform, I went to work with Republicans and Democrats. We passed the Children’s Health Insurance Program that insures 8 million kids every year. As Dick said, after we were attacked on 9/11, I worked with Democrats and Republicans to make sure we could rebuild New York and the Pentagon, and make sure we were as safe as we possibly could be.

This election will determine so much about our future. And one thing I know for sure is we have to start listening to and respecting each other again. We may have differences; that’s the American way. But we are stronger together. We can do anything if we put our minds to it. I saw the picture of Mother Teresa that was being held up here, and I was fortunate enough to know Mother Teresa. I was fortunate enough to actually work with her. We didn’t agree on everything, but we found common ground.

She asked me, when I was First Lady, to get a home for babies started in Washington so mothers who couldn’t care for their babies could take their babies to a safe place and those babies could be adopted. And when Mother Teresa asked you to do something, the only answer was, ‘Yes, ma’am.’ And I started working. And she would call me. She’d call me from India. She’d call me from Vietnam. She called me from everywhere. She’d say, ‘Where’s my home?’ And I’d say, ‘Well, Mother, working with the Washington, D.C. zoning department requires divine intervention.’ And so she did, and we got it done.

Here’s what I hope you will do. I hope you will get involved in this campaign for these last two months. I hope you will go to hillaryclinton.com and see how you can work, in Illinois, in Iowa. I hope you will text ‘join,’ j-o-i-n, and go to 47246, to see what you can do. We need everybody involved. There has never been a more important, consequential election in our lifetimes. And we need to elect progressive leaders like Tammy and Sherry and Dave Loebsack and others who are on the ballot as well.

I am confident and optimistic about America’s future. When I listen to Donald Trump, when I watched his convention, I honestly did not know what country he was talking about. It was so dark, so dire, so depressing. That’s not the America I know. It’s not the America that I see. I don’t deny that we have problems. Of course we do. We’re human beings. But my goodness, would you live anywhere else? Would you give up our freedom, our values, our opportunity, for anywhere else? I traveled to 112 countries as your Secretary of State, and every I went, I was so proud to land that plane which said the United States of America on it and to come down those stairs and begin to meet on behalf of our values, our interests, and our security. And there is not a place, despite what they say, that doesn’t envy who we are and what we have. We cannot put any of that at risk, my friends.

So for these last two months, join this campaign. Help us make history. Make sure that we are continuing to be not just great but even greater, and that we’re creating opportunities for the next generation, like my grandchildren. That’s what we can do together if we remember we are stronger together. God bless you!”

Win

 

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Hillary Clinton returned to the Old Statehouse in Springfield, Illinois today to address divisions in America and how to bridge them. It is her second campaign event in the historic hall where Lincoln delivered his “house divided” speech.  In March, Chris Matthews moderated her town hall in that historic location.

 

In Springfield, Hillary Clinton Aims to Bridge Divides in America

Clinton Argued that Trump Is Transforming the Party of Lincoln into the Party of Trump

During a speech at the Old State House in Springfield, Illinois on Wednesday—the site of Abraham Lincoln’s “House Divided” speech—Hillary Clinton addressed the challenges we face as a nation—including on race, economic inequality, and divisiveness.  She also spoke of the need for a president who will bring us together, not tear us apart. From Trump’s ban on Muslims to his promotion of anti-Semitic images pushed by neo-Nazis, Clinton argued that a Trump presidency would be a threat to our democracy and have dangerous repercussions in America and around the globe. Clinton also acknowledged the one-year anniversary of Illinois native Sandra Bland’s passing, reiterating her call for rebuilding trust between law enforcement and communities.

Pointing to the need to unite against Trump’s fear-mongering, Clinton said, “If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire [….] But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all. And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello! Hi. Thank you all very, very much, please be seated, it’s wonderful being back here. It’s always a special privilege having grown up in Chicago in the suburbs to be here in the state capitol and especially here in this great historic place filled with so much meaning, not just for Illinois but for our country. And I’m delighted to have this opportunity to talk with you about the state of our country today.

Nearly 160 years ago, Abraham Lincoln gave a speech in this statehouse that marked a turning point in the political life of our nation.

The question of slavery was being fiercely debated across America. Roughly half the states allowed it. Half abolished it. And some people – including Lincoln – believed that until it was gone entirely, our country would never be truly united and at peace.

So on June 16, 1858, when Mr. Lincoln kicked off his campaign for the United States Senate, he delivered an address on how slavery was tearing our country apart. And that it must go. Some thought that he ended up losing that Senate race because of that speech. But then he won the Presidency. And some thought it was because of that speech.

President Lincoln led America during the most challenging period in our nation’s history. He defended our Union, our Constitution, and the ideal of a nation ‘conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.’ His legacy included laws and amendments that enshrined those values for future generations. They protect and guide us still.

I’m here today, in this place, because the words Lincoln spoke all those years ago still hold resonance for us now.

Remember, he said, ‘A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect,’ he went on, ‘The Union to be dissolved; I do not expect the house to fall. But I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.’

The challenges we face today do not approach those of Lincoln’s time. Not even close. And we should be very clear about that.

But recent events have left people across America asking hard questions about whether we are still a house divided.

Despite our best efforts and highest hopes, America’s long struggle with race is far from finished.  In just the past week, we saw black men killed by police and five police officers killed by a sniper targeting white police. There is too much violence and hate in our country. Too little trust and common ground. It can feel impossible to have the conversations we need to have, to fix what’s broken.

And despite being the richest country on earth, we have too much economic inequality – and that also undermines the foundation of our democracy.

Lincoln understood that threat, too. He deeply believed everyone deserved – in his words – ‘a fair chance in the race of life.’ He saw it as a defining feature of the United States, and believed it was vital that hard-working people be free to enjoy the fruits of their own labor. It’s one of the reasons he was so strongly against slavery – because it violated that entire notion. And as President, he took pains to use the tools of government to create more economic opportunity for Americans at every level of society. So, too, must we fight inequality and create opportunity in our time – not just for some Americans, but for all.

So I come today as a mother and a grandmother to two beautiful little children. Who, I want them and all our children to grow up in a country where violence like the kind we saw last week doesn’t happen again – and where the American Dream is big enough for everyone.

I’m also here as a candidate for President who is deeply concerned about the divisions that still hold our people apart and our nation back. I believe that our future peace and prosperity depends on whether we meet this moment with honesty and courage.

That means taking a hard look at our laws and our attitudes. It means embracing policies that promote justice for all people, and standing firm against any attempt to roll back the clock on the rights and opportunities that so many sacrificed so much to secure.

And all of that starts with doing a better job of listening to each other.

We need to listen to the families whose loved ones have been killed in police incidents. Alton Sterling and Philando Castile are just the latest in a long and painful litany of African Americans dying after encounters with police officers. We remember Laquan McDonald, killed in Chicago a year and a half ago and Sandra Bland, who grew up in Illinois who died one year ago today. Time after time, no one is held accountable. And surely we can all agree that’s deeply wrong and needs to change.

And yes we do need to listen to those who say ‘Black Lives Matter.’ Too many black Americans, especially young men, feel like their lives are disposable. And they worry every single day about what might happen. They have reason to feel that way. And it’s absolutely unacceptable. Everyone in America, everyone deserves to be treated with respect and dignity. Surely that is something we can all unite behind.

We need to acknowledge the five Latinos who also lost their lives in police incidents last week. Their stories didn’t get national media coverage, but their families and communities are mourning too.

And at the same time, we need to listen to the dedicated, principled police officers working hard every day to rebuild trust with the communities they serve and protect. Our men and women in blue put their lives on the line everyday to keep us safe and keep our democracy strong. Remember what Michael Krol, Michael Smith, Lorne Ahrens, Brent Thompson and Patrick Zamarripa were doing when they died. They were protecting a peaceful march. They were people cloaked in authority making sure their fellow citizens could exercise their right to protest authority. And there’s nothing more vital to our democracy than that. And they gave their lives for it.

David Brown, the Dallas police chief, said that when it comes to overcoming systemic racism and so many other problems in society, we ask too much of the police and too little of everyone else. I think he’s absolutely right. This is our problem, and we all need to work together to solve it.

We also need to listen to the families crying out for relief from gun violence. President Obama’s trip to Dallas yesterday was the 11th time he has spoken to a city in mourning after a mass shooting. The wrong people keep getting their hands on guns. And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind that the Dallas killer had, which allowed him to outgun the police. And the vast majority of gun owners agree: we have to come together around common sense steps to prevent gun violence. If we’re looking for common ground – this is common ground. And I hope that we will, from Washington, to Springfield to everywhere across America, come to agreement about that.

Now I understand that just saying these things together may upset some people. I’m talking about police reform just a few days after a horrific attack on police officers. I’m talking about courageous, honorable police officers just a few days after officer-involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota. I’m bringing up guns in a country where just talking about comprehensive background checks and getting assault weapons off our streets gets you demonized.

But all these things can be true at the same time.

We do need criminal justice reform to save lives and to make sure all Americans are treated as equals in rights and dignity. We do need to support our police departments that are trying to get it right, and honor the men and women who protect us every day. We do need to do more to stop gun violence. We may disagree about how to do these things, but surely we can all agree with those basic premises. And I hope and pray the past week has showed us how true they are.

Now, these are the issues on many of our minds right now. And if we stop there, that would leave us with plenty of work to do.

So I wish I could say that was everything that we must address.

But these events are taking place against a much broader backdrop of fear and anxiety. So I think we have to face all of it.

We do need to make sure our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top. The changes that have roiled our economy over the past few decades are not just numbers on a page that economists study. They are real forces that families are dealing with up close and personal every day.

Not long ago, I met with factory workers here in Illinois whose jobs are being sent abroad, and heard how painful the consequences have been for them and their families. I’ve talked to workers across our country who’ve seen good jobs lost to technologies, who keep being told to get more training – even though that often doesn’t lead to a good new job on the other end.

These economic disruptions have stripped too many people of their sense of security and dignity. And that can have devastating consequences. We have to ask ourselves, why are drug addiction and suicide on the rise in parts of our country? That’s not just about economics. It’s about something deeper, that is connected to economics: a sense of dislocation, even a pessimism about whether America still holds anything for them or cares about them at all.

That’s why I’ve pledged that in my first 100 days as President, we will make the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II. We need more jobs you can support a family on, especially in places that have been left out and left behind from Coal Country to Indian Country to inner cities, to every place that’s been hollowed out when a factory closed or a mine shut down because everyone in America deserves that ‘fair chance in the race of life’ that President Lincoln described.

Now, I realize that our politics have contributed to the sense of division many Americans feel right now. And as someone in the middle of a hotly fought political campaign, I cannot stand here and claim that my words and actions haven’t sometimes fueled the partisanship that often stands in the way of progress. So I recognize I have to do better too.

I’m running for President with the belief that we need to face up to these challenges and fix them in order to become a stronger, fairer country. And in times like these, we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.

And that is why I believe Donald Trump is so dangerous.

His campaign is as divisive as any we have seen in our lifetimes. It is built on stoking mistrust and pitting American against American. It’s there in everything he says and everything he promises to do as President.

It’s there in how he wants to ban Muslims from coming to the United States, and toyed with creating a database to track Muslims in America. It’s there in the way he demeans women, in his promotion of an anti-Semitic image pushed by neo-Nazis, and in the months that he spent trying to discredit the citizenship and legitimacy of our first black President. Last night in an interview, he said that he understands systemic bias against black people because – and I quote – ‘even against me, the system is rigged’ – unquote. He went on to say, ‘I can relate to it very much myself.’  Even this – the killing of people – is somehow all about him.

It’s there in his proposals on immigration. He says he’ll round up 11 million people and kick them out. He’s actually described a special deportation force that would go around America, pulling people out of their homes and workplaces, pulling children out of school. I got a letter from a mother the other day who said her adopted son asked her with a shaky voice if President Trump would send him back to Ethiopia. When kids are scared by political candidates and policy debates, it’s a sign something has gone badly wrong.

And we see it in the violence that Donald Trump encouraged toward protesters at his rallies, and the strange things he has said about the violence that will occur if we don’t elect him. He says that if he doesn’t win this November, we – and again I quote – ‘won’t even have a country anymore,’ America’s ‘not going to continue to survive.’  I do not know what he’s talking about. But I do know we don’t need that kind of fear-mongering – not now, not ever.

And he’s gone even further even than that. He has taken aim at some of our most cherished democratic values and institutions. He wants to revoke the citizenship of 4 million Americans born in this country to immigrant parents, and eliminate the bedrock principle enshrined in the 14th Amendment – that if you’re born in America, you’re a citizen of America. He said that a distinguished American, born in Indiana, a judge can’t be trusted to do his job because his parents were Mexican; he called him a ‘Mexican judge’ over and over again. He knew that the judge had been born in Indiana. But it was a cynical, calculated attempt to fan the flames of racial division. And designed to undermine people’s faith in our judicial system. Why would someone running for President want to do that?

And even that’s not all. He says, as Commander-in-Chief, he would order our troops to commit war crimes, and insisted they would follow his orders, even though that goes against decades of military training and the military code. He’s banished members of the press who have criticized him – is there any doubt he would do the same as President? Imagine if he had not just Twitter and cable news to go after his critics and opponents, but also the IRS – or for that matter, our entire military. Given what we have seen and heard, do any of us think he’d be restrained?

And he has shown contempt for and ignorance of our Constitution. Last week, he met with House Republicans in Washington to try to assuage their serious concerns about him. One member asked whether he’d protect Article I, which defines the separation of powers between Congress and the executive branch. Here’s the answer he reportedly gave: ‘I want to protect Article One, Article Two, Article Twelve.’ Well here’s the thing – there is no Article Twelve – not even close. That was a serious question, from an elected representative, and he either didn’t care enough to answer it seriously – or he didn’t know where to begin.

Even the most stalwart Republicans were alarmed by that. And well they, and we, should be.

The first thing a new President does is take an oath to ‘protect and defend’ the Constitution. To do that with any meaning, you’ve got to know what’s in it. And you’ve got to respect what’s in it.

I do wish Donald Trump would listen to other people once in awhile. He might actually learn something. But he’s made it clear – that’s not his thing. As he has said, he only listens to himself.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln. We are watching it become the Party of Trump. And that’s not just a huge loss for our democracy – it is a threat to it.

Because Donald Trump’s campaign adds up to an ugly, dangerous message to America. A message that you should be afraid – afraid of people whose ethnicity is different, or religious faith is different, or who were born in a different country or hold different political beliefs.

Make no mistake – there are things to fear in this world, and we need to be clear-eyed about them. But we are each other’s countrymen and women. We share this miraculous country. This land and its heritage is yours, mine and everyone’s – willing to pledge allegiance and understand the solemn responsibilities of American citizenship. That’s what ‘indivisible’ means – that big word that every grade school student knows – that we’re in this together, even if that’s not always easy.

So let’s think better of each other. Let’s hold together in the face of our challenges – not turn on each other or tear each other down.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to a dangerous job we need them to do.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of African Americans and Latinos, and try as best we can to imagine what it would be like if we had to have ‘the talk’ with our kids about how carefully they need to act because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or killed.

And yes, let’s put ourselves in the shoes of Donald Trump’s supporters. We may disagree on the causes and the solutions to the challenges we face – but I believe like anyone else, they’re trying to figure out their place in a fast-changing America. They want to know how to make a good living and how to give their kids better futures and opportunities. That’s why we’ve got to reclaim the promise of America for all our people – no matter who they vote for.

And let’s be more than allies to each other. Let’s take on each other’s struggles as our own.

My life’s work is built on the conviction that we are stronger together. Not separated into factions or sides. Not shouting over each other, but together. Our economy is stronger when everyone contributes to it, and everyone can benefit from the work they do. Our communities are stronger when we all pull together to solve our problems and restore our faith in each other, and by doing so in the promise of America. Our country is stronger when we work with our friends and allies to promote peace, prosperity, and security around the world.

This is an idea that goes back to the founding of America, when 13 separate colonies found a way – despite their differences – to join together as one nation. They knew they were not stronger on their own, and neither are we.

I’ve had the great delight of seeing the musical “Hamilton.” And I hope more people at least get a chance to listen to the score and to hear the words. There’s a great song by the character playing George Washington who sings, ‘History’s eyes are on us.’ That was true then, and that’s true today.

If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire. Now don’t get me wrong, fierce debates are part of who we are – they started at my dinner table with my father, and have continued ever since. It is who we are. You’re reminded of that when you read history, when you think about the Lincoln-Douglas Debates. Debate over the right way forward.

And sometimes we have to balance competing values like freedom and order, justice and security, these are complementary values of American life. That isn’t easy. Previous generations have had to overcome terrible challenges. And no one more so than Abraham Lincoln. But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.

Thank you all very much.”

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The night before yet another powerful series of primary contests, Hillary sat down with Chris Matthews for a town hall in her home state.  At the Old State House in Springfield, in the room where Lincoln gave his “house divided” speech, Hillary spoke out against divisiveness and called for common ground.

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Trump: Hillary calls him responsible for the fury and said he incites and encourages the violence.

“Leaders should be calming people down.” She said protests should be peaceful and that voting is the best protest.

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Matthews showed video of RFK speaking out against violence after MLK Jr.’s assassination and of  Trump encouraging people to act on protesters.

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She said Trump is inciting mob violence.  “Donald Trump is fanning the flames of violence. That isn’t leadership. It’s dangerous.”

She spoke about Bill Clinton’s love of schmoozing and his curiosity about people.  Hillary pointed out that she doesn’t campaign in poetry but she does the job once she has it.

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Matthews misspoke and said Sanders won Iowa.  Hillary rapidly corrected him and said she doesn’t trust the polls.  (I don’t either!)  She also pointed out the number of delegates she has collected thus far.

Re: Trade – Hillary spoke about her vote against CAFTA (Central America Free Trade Agreement), and said she had waited to see what was in TPP before speaking out against it. She proposes a clawback for companies moving out of the country and leaving an unemployed work force – an exit tax.  “Companies that get tax breaks or government investments shouldn’t be walking out on American communities.”

In Europe and Asia there is a set of trade conditions which governments support whereas American companies are afloat without government intervention.  Hillary is firm that we cannot shut the door on global trade but wants to see the playing field leveled and fair for American companies that play by the trade rules.

Taking the title of his show very literally, Matthews got down in the sand on the Iraq War vote. Hillary set up the context of those days and the claim by George W. Bush that the vote would permit the needed inspections to be completed. This was a contentious exchange.  She revisited Bush’s promise to her that she would get the money to rebuild New York after 9/11 and said that was why she trusted his word.

In a Syrian context, Matthews brought up our history of “knocking off leaders.” (e.g. Mossadegh, Allende, Lumumba, Trujllo, others).  Question:  Should we do that?  Hillary said we cannot paint with a broad brush.

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Question about college debt: Hillary pointed to her New College Compact. “It’s not enough to make college more affordable. We need to help people with the student debt they already have.”

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Question from the Mayor of Springfield on sponsorship for immigrants.  Hillary said the screening process must be thorough and that there is an organization arranging sponsorships that is dependable.

Matthews asked Hillary to explain her journey from Goldwater girl to Eugene McCarthy supporter.  Hillary said she went to college as a Republican but found herself in the civil rights / voting rights camp.  Hillary said her mother and her youth minister helped expose her to lives that were different from her suburban upbringing.

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Question from a retired police officer on how to recreate a dialogue between the Black community and police:  Retraining of police as necessary led by experienced people in law enforcement.

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Reduction of gun violence: Hillary spoke about her visit today to a wall of bricks dedicated to kids killed in gun violence.  She said this needs to be a ballot issue.

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Tomorrow is another big day.  The voters will decide.  From Women’s Outreach:

Dear Women Leaders and Friends,

Tomorrow is a big primary day – 5 states will go to the polls to award a total of 792 delegates by the end of the night. Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, and Ohio are all important states and we’re fighting for every vote.

Help us make calls to voters in these states tonight and tomorrow as your schedule allows. You can find all of the information you need here:  https://www.hillaryclinton.com/grassroots/make-calls/

Thank you for all your hard work! Let’s bring home some big wins tomorrow!

 

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On the day before Super Tuesday 3.0, Hillary visited a neighborhood immigration center, a memorial to children killed in gun violence, and an industrial bakery. It’s Pi Day!

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives for an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives for an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. With Clinton at left is labor leader Dolores Huerta and far right is Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. With Clinton at left is labor leader Dolores Huerta and far right is Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, joined by Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., visits an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, joined by Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., visits an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton shakes hands with a local resident as she attends a workshop meeting at La Casa The Resurrection Project, a immigrant community center, during a campaign stop in Chicago Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton shakes hands with a local resident as she attends a workshop meeting at La Casa The Resurrection Project, a immigrant community center, during a campaign stop in Chicago Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is applauded during an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. With Clinton at left is labor leader Dolores Huerta. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is applauded during an immigration round table at The Resurrection Project at La Casa in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. With Clinton at left is labor leader Dolores Huerta. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Chicago Journeymen Local Plumbers Union in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Chicago Journeymen Local Plumbers Union in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives to speak during a campaign event at Chicago Journeymen Local Plumbers Union in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives to speak during a campaign event at Chicago Journeymen Local Plumbers Union in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with the mothers of victims of gun violence at a memorial called 'Kids of the Block' at Roseland neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with the mothers of victims of gun violence at a memorial called ‘Kids of the Block’ at Roseland neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton visits a memorial dedicated to victims of gun violence called 'Kids of the Block', at Roseland neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton visits a memorial dedicated to victims of gun violence called ‘Kids of the Block’, at Roseland neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton looks to Diane Latiker of Kids off the Block memorial, right, as she visits the memorial to children killed by gun violence in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton looks to Diane Latiker of Kids off the Block memorial, right, as she visits the memorial to children killed by gun violence in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, joined by Rev. Jesse Jackson, right, and Diane Latiker of Kids off the Block memorial, second from right, visits the memorial to children killed by gun violence in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, joined by Rev. Jesse Jackson, right, and Diane Latiker of Kids off the Block memorial, second from right, visits the memorial to children killed by gun violence in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with union members from Nabisco, an American manufacturer of cookies and snacks, to discuss labor related issues in Chicago, Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with union members from Nabisco, an American manufacturer of cookies and snacks, to discuss labor related issues in Chicago, Illinois March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets Monday, March 14, 2016, with Jethro Head, right, International Vice President of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, who represents workers at the Chicago Nabisco factory which is threatened with closure. (Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets Monday, March 14, 2016, with Jethro Head, right, International Vice President of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, who represents workers at the Chicago Nabisco factory which is threatened with closure. (Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets Monday, March 14, 2016, with U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush, left, and Jethro Head, right, International Vice President of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, who represents workers at the Chicago Nabisco factory which is threatened with closure. (Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets Monday, March 14, 2016, with U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush, left, and Jethro Head, right, International Vice President of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, who represents workers at the Chicago Nabisco factory which is threatened with closure. (Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Supporters hold up a sign that reads "Hillinois" as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Chicago Journeymen Local Plumbers Union in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Supporters hold up a sign that reads “Hillinois” as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Chicago Journeymen Local Plumbers Union in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, is greeted by Rev. Jesse Jackson, right, Diane Latiker of Kids off the Block memorial, second from right, and Rep Bobby Rush, D-Ill., as she arrives to visit Kids off the Block memorial l to children killed by gun violence in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, is greeted by Rev. Jesse Jackson, right, Diane Latiker of Kids off the Block memorial, second from right, and Rep Bobby Rush, D-Ill., as she arrives to visit Kids off the Block memorial l to children killed by gun violence in Chicago, Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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Check your local listings!

Hillary Clinton in Springfield Monday for an MSNBC town hall

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

By Staff report

Posted Mar. 11, 2016
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will be in Springfield on Monday to participate in a town-hall meeting hosted by cable channel MSNBC
The town hall, moderated by Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC’s “Hardball” program, will air at 6 p.m. on the cable channel. No other details, including the venue and whether the public can see the event in person, were immediately released in an announcement from MSNBC.

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After speaking in Tampa in Thursday, Hillary Clinton stopped off in Durham NC and held a rally in Vernon Hills IL.  She is in California today for Nancy Reagan’s funeral.

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a photo with a young girl during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a photo with a young girl during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a selfie picture during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a selfie picture during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets people in the audience during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets people in the audience during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reaches for books she is asked to sign as she greets people in the crowd during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reaches for books she is asked to sign as she greets people in the crowd during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets people in the crowd and posed for photographs during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets people in the crowd and posed for photographs during a campaign event at Sullivan Community Center and Family Aquatic Center in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts to her supporters' applaud during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts to her supporters’ applaud during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gets her photo taken with her supporters during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gets her photo taken with her supporters during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves at audience members during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves at audience members during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a campaign rally in Vernon Hills, Illinois March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, back next to the U.S. flag, speaks during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, back next to the U.S. flag, speaks during a campaign event in Vernon Hills, Ill., Thursday, March 10, 2016. (John Starks/Daily Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

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