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Hillary appeared with Senators Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken yesterday in Minneapolis.

At AFT Convention, Clinton Pledges to Work with Educators to Strengthen America’s Public Schools

At the AFT Convention in Minneapolis on Monday, Hillary Clinton reiterated her commitment to ensure every child receives a world-class education, regardless of their ZIP code. Clinton pledged to partner with teachers in the White House to repair our crumbling schools, invest in training and support for our educators, and provide every student in America the opportunity to learn computer science.

Clinton argued that Donald Trump is unfit to serve as president. Trump wants to “largely” eliminate the Department of Education, believes we invest too much in public education, and selected a running mate who slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students. As Clinton said, “Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello!  Hello, AFT!  My goodness, I was listening in the back and I heard Randi at the end of her remarks say, ‘And I’ve known her for 25 years.’ Wow, it’s been fun, hasn’t it?  Gone by fast.

Well, I’m thrilled to be here, and it is only fitting that AFT is celebrating your centennial right here in Minnesota, a state with a proud tradition of public service and great public education.I am thrilled that former Vice President Walter Mondale is here with us. He was one of my earliest inspirations, and I am always grateful for his life of service.  And I also want to say a word about Governor Wendell Anderson.  My thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends, and the countless people whose lives he touched.  Minnesota has a great tradition of electing terrific public servants. And I am so proud to be here with this state’s dynamic duo.  You got a preview, a taste of the combination that Amy and Al represent, but I can tell you that the two senators from Minnesota are among the greatest that Minnesota has ever sent to Washington, and among the greatest to have ever served in the United States Senate. And I just said exactly what they told me to say.  I’ve known Al a long time.  He handed me this slip of paper on the way in.  But no, I consider them both great friends and I am so excited about being able to work with them again starting next January 2017.And Randi, thank you for that introduction, but much more than that, thanks for standing up to injustice in all of its forms.  As Randi said earlier, these have been difficult days for our country and the world.  Just over a week ago, Philando Castile died in a police incident outside St. Paul.”\

AUDIENCE MEMBERS:  “Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.  Hands up, don’t shoot.”

HILLARY CLINTON:  “And I just had the great honor – the great honor and the great privilege of meeting with his mother and meeting with two of his uncles and his sister.  And I had heard a lot about Phil, because that is what they call him.  And I share – I share the urgency and the commitment to actually address these issues.

But let me tell you, my friends, let me tell you, we cannot let this madness continue. A lot of people are still in pain right here, including his courageous family, his coworkers and students at the St. Paul public schools.  And to our AFT brothers and sisters in the Twin Cities who knew him as a fellow educator who cared deeply about this community and its children, his mother was telling me how he never wanted to miss a day of work.  He drove 30 miles from their home in Minneapolis to the school where he worked.  Nothing could stop him from being there.  And his death, his loss is ours as well.  Our country has been confronted – our country has been confronted with tragedy too many times recently, hasn’t it?  From St. Paul to Orlando, from Dallas to Baton Rouge, where we saw three police officers murdered yesterday in an apparent ambush.  This hate, this violence cannot stand.  Killing police officers is a crime against us all.  There can be no justification, no looking the other way, and this must end.  And it can. It can be true both that we need law enforcement and that we need to improve law enforcement to get back – to get back to the fundamental principle that everyone in every community benefits when there is respect for the law and everyone is respected by the law.

The service and sacrifice of your fellow public employees is crucial to keeping our communities safe, and these murders threaten the painful, essential work we have to do as a nation.  And for many of the people in this room, that work includes explaining these incidents to our children.  Something you’ve had to do more and more this past year.  So to every single AFT member, I say thank you.

Thank you for caring for all of our children no matter what they look like, where they come from, or who they are.

And thank you for being one of the essential partners in everything we’ve got to do to move our country in the right direction.  Thank you for fighting to reform our broken campaign finance system.  I will stand with you and propose a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. Thank you.  Thank you for fighting to defend and improve the Affordable Care Act – and I will work with you to keep pushing for universal health care coverage. Most of all, thank you for a century of fighting for fairness and opportunity – the teachers, paraprofessionals, school-related personnel, the nurses, and public service employees of AFT.

I know that you have some of the hardest, most important jobs in the world.  And I want to say right from the outset that I’m with you. When I am president, you will have a partner in the White House and you will always have a seat at the table. Because just like you, I get up every day and I ask, how can we do better for America’s kids?  I am committed to making sure every child in this country receives a world-class education with good schools and good teachers, no matter what ZIP code they live in. And I know that starts with supporting parents to be their child’s first teachers. And expanding access to high-quality childcare and universal preschool for every single child.

I know that means repairing our crumbling schools and investing in training and support for our educators, because when we invest in education, we invest in our country’s future.  And you know what?  We also then invest in a stronger economy.  Some of you may know that these issues aren’t new to me.  My first job out of law school was working for the Children’s Defense Fund.  I went door to door in New Bedford, Massachusetts, talking with families whose kids had disabilities that made it hard or impossible for them to go to school.  Our work helped convince Congress to guarantee access to education for all students.  And years later, when my husband was governor of Arkansas, he put me in charge of working to improve our schools, and we held hearings in every county and we came up with a plan, then we fought hard to raise standards and get schools more resources and to get teachers the raises they deserved, which was the highest increase of any state in the country at that time.

So, you see, along with my personal experience, I carry these lessons.  If we work together, we can give schools and educators the resources you need to succeed.  My plan to strengthen public education comes down to TLC: teaching, learning, and community.  America is asking more of our educators than ever before.  Some of you heard the impassioned plea from the police chief in Dallas when he said our society is asking so much more of our police to deal with so many problems.  Well, it’s true of our teachers and our educators as well.

We look to you to fill in gaps that we, as a country, have neglected, like helping low-income kids, English-language learners, kids with disabilities thrive.  And we ask you to help right wrongs, from poverty and homelessness to the legacy of racial inequities stretching back centuries.  We ask so much of you and we don’t give you enough in return. As president, I will launch a national campaign to modernize and elevate the profession of teaching.  I want all educators, at every stage of your careers, to know you’ll be able to keep learning, improving and innovating.  And we also need to be serious about raising wages for teachers and support staff.  Anyone who works full-time in America should be able to earn a living wage without taking second and third jobs just to get by.

And the last thing a teacher needs when you’re just starting out is a mountain of student debt.  When I’m president, future students won’t have to borrow a dime to attend public colleges or universities.  For families making less than $125,000 a year, we will eliminate tuition at public colleges and universities altogether. And for the millions who already have student debt, you will be able to refinance your student loans so you never have to pay more than you can afford.  And if you go into public service, which includes teaching, any remaining debt will be forgiven after 10 years.

Now, we need to make college more affordable, but we can’t cut costs at the expense of talented, committed educators at colleges across the country, including adjunct faculty members.  (Cheers and applause.)  They also deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, and to have a strong voice with a union. If we are serious about supporting educators, we need to support unions.  And I will fight back against attacks on working families in America, and I will defend your right to organize and bargain collectively, and we will not stand for attempts to privatize public services.

Now, here’s what I know.  I know these things can only be done with you in partnership.  So I’m asking you, asking educators across the country, to work with me; asking you to advise me and to hold me accountable; to keep advocating for your students, your profession, and your communities.  Because together, we are stronger, and we can produce results if we get up every single day, make up our minds we’re going to keep working to achieve the goals that I have set out.

The second piece of TLC is learning.  We need to educate our children for the future, not the past.  We want our children to be creators, innovators, entrepreneurs, critical thinkers who can collaborate and communicate within their communities and around the world.  That means we need to be reaching together for new heights, not rehashing old arguments.  It’s time to stop focusing only on, quote, ‘failing schools.’  Let’s focus on all of our great schools too.  When schools get it right, let’s replicate their practices across America. There’s a lot we can learn from each other, and I intend to make sure that we have the best research, the best evidence, no matter where it comes from – that you then can put to work on behalf of your students.

So yes, we are going to do everything possible to work with schools across America.  I’ve been in a lot of those schools.  I used to have what I called the Chelsea test. Now I’ve got the Charlotte test. And that test is pretty simple.  Would I want my daughter, and now my granddaughter, and soon my grandson, to go to school here? I’ll tell you what.  I have walked into a lot of schools where I said, boy, would I be happy – would I be happy to have the most important child in the world to me attend here.  But I’ve also walked into schools where literally the building is falling down, where you can see the holes in the ceiling, where you can see the mold, where you walk into a library and there’s not a single book and there certainly is not a computer.  We can’t tolerate that.  We can’t let any one of America’s precious children – I don’t care who they are – attend a school that shows we don’t care about them.

And that’s why we are not going to go in the direction of letting people on the outside foist for-profit schools on our kids.  We are going to continue to oppose vouchers that drain resources from public schools and undermine their ability to provide the education our children deserve. Where there are public charter schools, we will learn from them.  But what we’re interested in is making sure that every child in our country has the chance to attend a great public school. And I believe part of that rests on working together to find the right balance on testing.

Now, look, you know; you’re the experts.  Tests can provide critical information to teachers and parents to find out how kids are doing, how schools are doing to help them improve.  But when you are forced to teach to a test, our children miss out on some of the most valuable experiences they can gain in a classroom during their school years. I personally have no time for these so-called education wars.  It’s time for those of us who believe in public education to sit at one table, around it together, and listen to you – the teachers and support paraprofessionals who actually are with our kids all day long.

And let’s start making decisions about what’s best for our kids not in accordance with some entrenched ideology.  Consider this:  Right now, there are more than half a million open jobs that require computing skills across the country, in every major industry.  But you know the majority of our schools don’t offer computer science.  That’s partly because there’s a shortage of computer science teachers, it’s partly because our educators don’t have the time or resources to learn how to integrate digital tools into their curriculum.  And we can do something about that.  And on top of it, more than 70 percent of teachers assign homework that requires broadband access, but more than 5 million children don’t have it.  We’re just taking this digital divide and making it a huge problem in the lives of 5 million kids.  And we can do something about that.

As president, I will be your partner to take on these challenges.  We’re going to make sure every child in America has the opportunity to learn computer science.  We’re going to work to close the homework gap by making every student has broadband access that they can use to do their homework. So let’s use all the tools at our disposal, including technology, to give kids an education that will meet the skills needed for the jobs we’re producing.

And finally, there’s C in TLC, community.  So much of what happens inside your classroom is determined by what happens outside.  Too many of our public school students are living in poverty.  For the first time ever, it’s a majority.  51 percent.  That’s on all of us.  But you see students coming to school hungry or exhausted from a long night in a shelter.  So many kids have the weight of the world on their little shoulders.  And we need to tackle all the problems holding our kids back.  And we need to do it together.

I’ve had so many meetings and conversations with teachers, it just breaks my heart, as they tell me about kids who come to school in the dead of winter, no coat on their back.  Come to school unable to even look in their teacher’s face because of what just happened at home or on the way to school.  Go home from school dodging gangs trying to recruit them.  That’s a stain on all of us.  Let’s create more community schools.  More partnerships between schools, social services, and nonprofit organizations.  Let’s pledge that we’re going to give children who need it the mental health services that they deserve.

And you should not have to be from a wealthy family to join a soccer team or have access to extracurricular activities that can develop your confidence and your feeling that you are an important person in the world in the eyes of those who are looking at you.  So we’re going to have to work together.  There is no choice.  From the community level all the way to the White House.  That’s just one of the many reasons why this election is it so important.  I’ll tell you what.  If I weren’t running against him, I would ask Randy to invite me here so I could rail against him.

Because it’s no surprise, my friends, that Donald Trump has a very different take on all of this.  He has said that America spends too much on education.  This is coming from someone who wants to give millionaires a free trillion dollar tax cut over the next decade. At least.  I’d like to hear him explain that to parents in Detroit, where students are trying to learn in crumbling, rodent infested classrooms.  He wants to, and I quote, ‘largely eliminate the Department of Education.’  But he says maybe he’ll leave some tentacles out there, whatever that means.

Now look, that agency may not always get it right, but it provides support for vital programs, from pre-K to Pell grants, and crucial resources to help low income students, students with disabilities, and English-language learners.  So Donald Trump would leave our most vulnerable students to fend for themselves.  If you want to know what kind of president Donald Trump will be, just look at who he’s chosen as his running mate. A Tea Party politician who has worked to undermine the rights of women, workers, LGBT Americans, and immigrants.

Mike Pence is one of the most extreme vice presidential picks in a generation.  And he’s one of the most hostile politicians in America when it comes to public education.  As governor of Indiana, he cut millions from higher education while he was giving huge tax cuts to corporations.  He turned away millions of federal dollars that could have expanded access to preschool for low income children, and slashed funding for schools that served Indiana’s most vulnerable students.  Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education.

And one more thing.  Parents and educators across America are already worried about what they’re calling the Trump effect, with bullying and harassment on the rise in our schools.  Last week, a mother in Wisconsin wrote me a letter saying that her adopted son had turned to her and said, if Trump becomes president, he’s going to make me go back to Ethiopia.  That’s the kind of fear Donald Trump is creating in the heart of a 10 year old boy.  What do our children think when he calls women pigs, or mocks a reporter with a disability?  Or when he talks about banning one and a half billion Muslims from entering our country?  What do our kids take away from his racist attack against a federal judge, or when he encourages his supporters to punch protesters in the face?  You wouldn’t tolerate that kind of behavior in your home or in your classroom.  How can we stand for it from someone running to be president of the United States?

Well, we know America’s a bighearted, fair-minded country, and that with your help, we’re going to continue to stress to our kids this is one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.  Not just for people who look a certain way, or worship a certain way.  We’re stronger when every child has the chance to live up to his or her full potential.  And public education gives our kids that chance.  So that’s why I’m counting on you. I’m counting on the AFT.  I’m counting on the American public to make sure as many people as possible get registered to vote, get educated, and get mobilized.

Today I announced a nationwide effort by my campaign to get more than 3 million Americans to register and commit to vote in November.  We would love your help. Please go to Hillaryclinton.com/vote to get involved.  And then let’s keep going.  Let’s keep making our case, working for better schools, more resources, more support, to give all of our kids the chance that they deserve.  With your help, we’re going to make sure we get to work on that agenda together, because we’re going to make sure we don’t turn our country over to Donald Trump.  Let’s go win in November.  Thank you all very, very much.”

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At the 107th Annual NAACP Convention at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati., Hillary Clinton spoke of recent shootings of civilians, assaults on police, and systemic racism.

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At NAACP Convention, Hillary Clinton Condemns Recent Shootings of Police; Reiterates Call to Work Together for Needed Reforms

At the NAACP National Convention in Cincinnati on Monday, Hillary Clinton forcefully condemned the recent police shootings, including the killing of officers Brad Garafola, Matthew Gerald, and Montrell Jackson in Baton Rouge. Clinton reiterated the pressing need to support our law enforcement officers, reform our criminal justice system, and pass common sense gun laws to keep our communities and police officers safe.  As Clinton said, “So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. [….] We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.”

In addition, Clinton announced a nationwide voter mobilization goal to register and commit to vote more than 3 million voters to be a part of this campaign. In the kickoff week alone, Hillary for America and the state Democratic coordinated campaigns will host more than 500 registration or commit to vote events across the country.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello, NAACP! It is so good to be here with all of you.

I want to start by thanking my longtime friend and colleague, my collaborator, and partner, and so many important causes; Hazel Dukes is a treasure. A treasure not only for New York, but for the NAACP and for our country. Thank you so much dear Hazel.

I want to thank your Chair, Rosyln Brock. Thank you so much Madame Chair. Your President and CEO Cornell Brooks, and everyone here today, including all the elected officials who have already appeared before you and those who will be addressing you during this convention.

And I have to start by saying we all know about that other Convention happening up in Cleveland today. Well, my opponent in this race may have a different view, but there’s nowhere I’d rather be than right here with all of you.

For more than a century, you’ve been on the frontlines, pushing America to become a better, fairer country. You and your noble predecessors have marched, sat in, stood up and spoke out – all to bring us closer to our founding ideals of equality for all.

And yes we have made progress, we see the results: in classrooms where children of all races learn side by side; in boardrooms and break rooms, where workers of all backgrounds are able to earn a living and support their families; at every level of government, where more and more the people we elect to represent America actually look like America.

And, of course, in the White House, with our wonderful President and First Lady and their daughters, Barack and Michelle Obama.

So as the President has said, and indeed, as he exemplified, we’ve come a long way.  But you know – and I know – that we have so much further to go.

We were cruelly reminded of that with the tragic deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, two more black men killed by police incidents, this time in Louisiana and Minnesota. And then in Dallas, five police officers killed while serving and protecting peaceful protestors, targeted because they were police.

And we saw it again just yesterday, when three police officers were shot in an apparent ambush in Baton Rouge. This madness has to stop.

Watching the news from Baton Rouge yesterday, my heart broke not just for those officers and their grieving families, but for all of us.  Because we have difficult, painful, important work ahead of us to repair the bonds between police and communities, and between and among each other.  We need one another to do this work.  And we need leaders like the NAACP. We need police officers to help us do this work.  These murders threaten all of that.

Killing police officers is a terrible crime.  That’s why our laws treat the murders of police so seriously because they represent the rule of law itself. If you take aim at that, you take aim at all of us. Anyone who does it and anyone who helps must be held accountable.  And as president, I will bring the full weight of the law to bear in making sure that those who kill a police officer are brought to justice.  There can be no justification.  No looking the other way.  We all have to make sure and pray it ends.

The officers killed yesterday in Baton Rouge were named Montrell Jackson, Matthew Gerald, Brad Garafola.  When they died, they were responding to a call about a man with a gun.  How many families, how many more families, would pay the price if we didn’t have brave men and women answering those calls?  That’s why I’m haunted by the images of what the officers were doing in Dallas when they died.  Protecting a peaceful march, talking with the protestors. Where would our democracy be without courageous people willing to do that?

So we all need to be partners in making law enforcement as secure and effective as it needs to be. That means investing in our police – in training on the proper use of force, especially lethal force. How to avoid using force to resolve incidents.

Officer safety and wellness – everything they need to do their jobs right and rebuild trust with their communities.  I’ve said from the beginning of my campaign, that will be my priority as President.

Perhaps the best way to honor our police is to follow the lead of police departments across the country striving to do better.  The deaths of Alton and Philando drove home how urgently we need to make reforms to policing and criminal justice — how we cannot rest until we root out implicit bias and stop the killings of African Americans.

Because there is, as you know so well, another hard truth at the heart of this complex matter. Many African Americans fear the police. I can hear you, some of you in this room. And today there are people all across America sick over what happened in Baton Rouge and in Dallas. But also fearful that the murders of police officers mean that vital questions about police-community relations will go unanswered.

Now that is a reasonable fear isn’t it? All of this tells us very powerfully that something needs to change. Many police officers across the country agree with that. There’s a real opportunity here for cooperation.

But that can only happen if we can build trust and accountability. And let’s admit it. That gets harder every time someone else is killed.

So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. I know that the NAACP, and so many of you individually, will do all you can to help our nation heal and start the work together to meet these challenges.

We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.

And let’s admit it, there is clear evidence that African-Americans are disproportionately killed in police incidents than any other group.  And African-American men are far more likely to be stopped and searched by police, charged with crimes, and sentenced to longer prison terms than white men convicted of the same offenses.  These facts tell us something is profoundly wrong. We can’t ignore that. We can’t wish it away. We have to make it right.

That means end-to-end reform in our criminal justice system – not half-measures, but a full commitment with real follow through. That’s why the very first speech I gave in this campaign, back in April of 2015 was about criminal justice reform. And the next President should make a commitment to fight for the reforms we so desperately need. Holding police departments like Ferguson accountable. Requiring accurate data on in-custody deaths, like Sandra Bland. Creating clear, national guidelines on the use of force, especially legal force. Supporting independent investigations of fateful encounters with the police. So I pledge to you, I will start taking action on day one and every day after that until we get this done.

And you know what? When the 24-hour news cycle moves on, I won’t. This is too important. This goes to the heart of who we are. This is about our character as Americans. That’s why we also need to fix the crisis of mass incarceration. Eliminate the disparity in sentencing between crack and powder cocaine. Dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline that starts in school and diverts too many African American kids out of school and into the criminal justice system, instead of giving them the education they deserve to have. And we need to do, all of us need to do – and I look forward to working with the NAACP – we need to do a much better job of helping people who’ve paid their debt to society find jobs and support when they get out.

America is well known, and we want to be a land of second chances – but so many Americans never had a first chance to begin with.  So let’s give everyone a fair chance at rebuilding their lives.  As Abraham Lincoln said, ‘Give everyone a fair chance in the race of life.’ My plan would make significant investments in reentry programs for the formerly incarcerated.  And I will ‘Ban the box’ in the federal government. People deserve a real shot at an interview instead of being told ‘No,’ right out of the gate.

Then beyond criminal justice, we must, we must fight for commonsense reforms to stop gun violence. This is by far, gun violence, by far the leading cause of death for young African-American men, outstripping the next nine causes of death combined.  The wrong people, the wrong people keep getting their hands on guns.  And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind the Dallas shooter had, which allowed him to outgun the police.

That’s why the Cleveland police, yesterday, demanded that the state suspend open carry of guns on the streets during the Republican National Convention.  And last week, the extraordinary and inspiring Dallas police chief, Chief Brown, told lawmakers, ‘Do your job. We’re doing ours,’ he said.  He’s right.  When he went on to say we’re putting our lives on the line. We’ve got to do better.

People who should care about protecting of police officers should be committed to getting assault weapons off the streets to start with.  And they should join us in instituting comprehensive background checks because law enforcement officers are nearly 50 percent, nearly 50 percent, less likely to be killed in states where there are checks on the purchase of handguns.

But even if we succeed in passing these laws and implementing them, we’ve got to go even further than that.

We need to do something about the racial inequities in our healthcare system.  Right now, black kids are 500 percent more likely to die from asthma than white kids – 500 percent! Right now a black baby in South Carolina is twice as likely to die before her first birthday as a white baby.  Imagine if those numbers were reversed, and it were white kids dying.  Imagine the outcry and the resources that would flood in.

And let’s do everything we can to create more jobs in places where unemployment remains stubbornly high after generations of underinvestment and neglect.  I’m a big fan of Congressman Jim Clyburn’s ‘10-20-30’ plan – steering 10 percent of federal investment to neighborhoods where 20 percent of the population has been living below the poverty line for 30 years.

That should go nationwide because the unemployment rate among young African Americans is twice as high as for young white people. And because of that, my plan also includes $20 billion aimed specifically at creating jobs for young people. If you don’t get that first job, it’s hard to get the second job, and it’s hard to build that solid financial base.

And because of the Great Recession, the median wealth for black families is now just a tiny fraction of the median wealth for white families.  That’s why my plan includes steps to help more African-American families buy a home, which has always been one of the surest ways to build wealth and security for a family.

We will do more to support black entrepreneurs get access to capital. And I want to give a shout out to black women, who represent the fastest-growing segment of women-owned businesses in America.

I want to unleash all of that energy and all of that talent. We need to view all of these issues also as part of the struggle for civil rights. Rosa Parks opened up every seat on the bus: our challenge now is to expand jobs so that everyone can afford the fare.  And let’s ensure that the bus route reaches every neighborhood, and connects every family with safe, affordable housing, good jobs, and quality schools.

Now, I know none of this will surprise those of you who know me. I’ve got a lot of plans. You can go to my website, Hillary-Clinton-dot-com and read our full agenda.

Because you see, I have this old-fashioned idea: if you’re running for President, you should say exactly what you want to do and how you will get it done.  I do sweat the specifics because I think they matter.  Whether one more kid gets health care, one more person finds a job, or one more woman entrepreneur gets access to capital to follow her dream – those just may be details in Washington, but it really matters to those people and their families.

And the truth is, we need to plan because we face a complex set of economic, social and political challenges: they’re intersectional; they’re reinforcing.  We’ve got to take them all on. We can’t wait and just do one at a time.

But the answers won’t just come from Washington.  Ending systemic racism requires contributions from all of us – especially, especially those of us who haven’t experienced it ourselves.

I’ve been saying this for a while now – and I’m going to keep saying it, because I think it’s important.  We white Americans need to do a better job of listening when African Americans talk about the seen and unseen barriers you face every day.

We need to recognize our privilege and practice humility, rather than assume that our experiences are everyone’s experiences.

We all need to try, as best we can, to walk in one another’s shoes – to imagine what it would be like to sit our son or daughter down and have ‘the talk’ about how carefully they need to act around police because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or even killed.

Let’s also put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to do a dangerous job that their families pray will bring them home safe at night. Empathy works both ways.  We’ve got to try to see the world through their eyes, too.

When you get right down to it, that’s what makes it possible for people from every background, every race, every religion, to come together as one nation.  It’s what makes our country endure.

And in times like these we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.  I will work every single day to do just that. And what I’m about to say, I say with no satisfaction, the Republican nominee for President will do the exact opposite.

He might say otherwise if he were here.  But of course, he declined your invitation.

So all we can go on is what he has said and done in the past.

Donald Trump led the movement to de-legitimize our first black president, trumpeting the so-called ‘birther’ movement.

Donald Trump plays coy with white supremacists.  Donald insults Mexican immigrants, even an American judge born of Mexican heritage.  Donald Trump demeans women.  Donald Trump wants to ban an entire religion from entering our country.

And Donald Trump loves to talk to the press.  But let’s not forget, let us not forget: the first time Donald Trump was quoted in The New York Times was in 1973, when the Justice Department went after his company for refusing to rent apartments to African Americans.

It was one of the largest federal cases of its kind at the time. And when federal investigators spoke with Trump’s employees, they said they were instructed to mark rental applications from black people with a ‘C.’ A ‘C’ for colored.

By now, we’ve heard a lot of troubling things about Donald Trump but that one’s shocking.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln.  And we are watching it become the Party of Trump.  And that’s not just a huge loss to our democracy – it is a threat to our democracy.

And it all adds up, it all adds up to an undeniable conclusion:  I don’t care if you’re a Democrat, a Republican, an Independent — Donald Trump cannot become President of the United States.

And that’s why we’ve got to work together to get out the vote this fall.

You know that better than anyone.  That’s why the theme of this conference is ‘Our Lives Matter, Our Votes Count.’

I agree with both of that. And now I think your votes count more than ever.

That’s why we’ve got to stand up against any attempt to roll back the clock on voting rights.  Encourage everyone, everyone we know to stand up and be counted in this November election.

As Dr. King said, ‘Our lives begin to end when we become silent about things that matter.’  None of us, none of us, can afford to be silent with so much at stake.

That’s why, here today, I am pleased to announce a nationwide drive to get 3 million people to register to vote and to commit to vote in this election.

We are hosting more than 500 registration events this week, across the country. We’re going to minor league baseball games, college campuses, barbershops, hair salons, street corners. And with those we cannot connect with in person, we’ve created an online, one stop shop registration tool, in English and in Spanish.

And my team in Ohio wanted me to make sure you all know that we’re hiring.  We actually have a recruiter here today – he’s got a table set up in the hall.  We’re hiring paid organizers to help us get out the vote and get our message out all across Ohio. So please spread the word – we want great people on our team.  That’s the way we’re going to be successful. We’re not the red team or the blue team, we’re the American team, and it’s time we start acting like it.

I have no doubt we can rise to meet these challenges if we stand together– no doubt at all. And if we are looking for inspiration, let’s go to one of the officers killed yesterday. 10 days ago, Montrell Jackson, a young African American police officer in Baton Rouge, posted a message on Facebook, he wrote so honestly and powerfully about the struggle of being black and wearing blue in today’s America.

‘I’m tired,’ he wrote, ‘in uniform I get nasty, hateful looks, and out of uniform, they consider me a threat.’ He went on, ‘These are trying times, please don’t let hate infect your heart. I’m working in these streets, so any protesters, officers, friends, families, or whoever, if you see me,’ Montrell said, ‘and need a hug, or want to say a prayer, I’ve got you.’

That, my friends, is the strength of America. Men like Montrell Jackson. Despite all our challenges, that spirit of love and community must guide us still. We have to heal the divides that remain, make the United States what it should be, stronger and fairer. More opportunity for every one of our people. I would not be standing here on the brink of accepting the Democratic nomination if I did not believe, if I did not in my heart believe, that America’s best years are still ahead of us. So let us go forward with faith, with confidence, with optimism. Our children and our grandchildren deserve no less.

Thank you, God bless you and God bless the United States of America.”

 

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Hillary Clinton returned to the Old Statehouse in Springfield, Illinois today to address divisions in America and how to bridge them. It is her second campaign event in the historic hall where Lincoln delivered his “house divided” speech.  In March, Chris Matthews moderated her town hall in that historic location.

 

In Springfield, Hillary Clinton Aims to Bridge Divides in America

Clinton Argued that Trump Is Transforming the Party of Lincoln into the Party of Trump

During a speech at the Old State House in Springfield, Illinois on Wednesday—the site of Abraham Lincoln’s “House Divided” speech—Hillary Clinton addressed the challenges we face as a nation—including on race, economic inequality, and divisiveness.  She also spoke of the need for a president who will bring us together, not tear us apart. From Trump’s ban on Muslims to his promotion of anti-Semitic images pushed by neo-Nazis, Clinton argued that a Trump presidency would be a threat to our democracy and have dangerous repercussions in America and around the globe. Clinton also acknowledged the one-year anniversary of Illinois native Sandra Bland’s passing, reiterating her call for rebuilding trust between law enforcement and communities.

Pointing to the need to unite against Trump’s fear-mongering, Clinton said, “If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire [….] But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all. And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello! Hi. Thank you all very, very much, please be seated, it’s wonderful being back here. It’s always a special privilege having grown up in Chicago in the suburbs to be here in the state capitol and especially here in this great historic place filled with so much meaning, not just for Illinois but for our country. And I’m delighted to have this opportunity to talk with you about the state of our country today.

Nearly 160 years ago, Abraham Lincoln gave a speech in this statehouse that marked a turning point in the political life of our nation.

The question of slavery was being fiercely debated across America. Roughly half the states allowed it. Half abolished it. And some people – including Lincoln – believed that until it was gone entirely, our country would never be truly united and at peace.

So on June 16, 1858, when Mr. Lincoln kicked off his campaign for the United States Senate, he delivered an address on how slavery was tearing our country apart. And that it must go. Some thought that he ended up losing that Senate race because of that speech. But then he won the Presidency. And some thought it was because of that speech.

President Lincoln led America during the most challenging period in our nation’s history. He defended our Union, our Constitution, and the ideal of a nation ‘conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.’ His legacy included laws and amendments that enshrined those values for future generations. They protect and guide us still.

I’m here today, in this place, because the words Lincoln spoke all those years ago still hold resonance for us now.

Remember, he said, ‘A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect,’ he went on, ‘The Union to be dissolved; I do not expect the house to fall. But I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.’

The challenges we face today do not approach those of Lincoln’s time. Not even close. And we should be very clear about that.

But recent events have left people across America asking hard questions about whether we are still a house divided.

Despite our best efforts and highest hopes, America’s long struggle with race is far from finished.  In just the past week, we saw black men killed by police and five police officers killed by a sniper targeting white police. There is too much violence and hate in our country. Too little trust and common ground. It can feel impossible to have the conversations we need to have, to fix what’s broken.

And despite being the richest country on earth, we have too much economic inequality – and that also undermines the foundation of our democracy.

Lincoln understood that threat, too. He deeply believed everyone deserved – in his words – ‘a fair chance in the race of life.’ He saw it as a defining feature of the United States, and believed it was vital that hard-working people be free to enjoy the fruits of their own labor. It’s one of the reasons he was so strongly against slavery – because it violated that entire notion. And as President, he took pains to use the tools of government to create more economic opportunity for Americans at every level of society. So, too, must we fight inequality and create opportunity in our time – not just for some Americans, but for all.

So I come today as a mother and a grandmother to two beautiful little children. Who, I want them and all our children to grow up in a country where violence like the kind we saw last week doesn’t happen again – and where the American Dream is big enough for everyone.

I’m also here as a candidate for President who is deeply concerned about the divisions that still hold our people apart and our nation back. I believe that our future peace and prosperity depends on whether we meet this moment with honesty and courage.

That means taking a hard look at our laws and our attitudes. It means embracing policies that promote justice for all people, and standing firm against any attempt to roll back the clock on the rights and opportunities that so many sacrificed so much to secure.

And all of that starts with doing a better job of listening to each other.

We need to listen to the families whose loved ones have been killed in police incidents. Alton Sterling and Philando Castile are just the latest in a long and painful litany of African Americans dying after encounters with police officers. We remember Laquan McDonald, killed in Chicago a year and a half ago and Sandra Bland, who grew up in Illinois who died one year ago today. Time after time, no one is held accountable. And surely we can all agree that’s deeply wrong and needs to change.

And yes we do need to listen to those who say ‘Black Lives Matter.’ Too many black Americans, especially young men, feel like their lives are disposable. And they worry every single day about what might happen. They have reason to feel that way. And it’s absolutely unacceptable. Everyone in America, everyone deserves to be treated with respect and dignity. Surely that is something we can all unite behind.

We need to acknowledge the five Latinos who also lost their lives in police incidents last week. Their stories didn’t get national media coverage, but their families and communities are mourning too.

And at the same time, we need to listen to the dedicated, principled police officers working hard every day to rebuild trust with the communities they serve and protect. Our men and women in blue put their lives on the line everyday to keep us safe and keep our democracy strong. Remember what Michael Krol, Michael Smith, Lorne Ahrens, Brent Thompson and Patrick Zamarripa were doing when they died. They were protecting a peaceful march. They were people cloaked in authority making sure their fellow citizens could exercise their right to protest authority. And there’s nothing more vital to our democracy than that. And they gave their lives for it.

David Brown, the Dallas police chief, said that when it comes to overcoming systemic racism and so many other problems in society, we ask too much of the police and too little of everyone else. I think he’s absolutely right. This is our problem, and we all need to work together to solve it.

We also need to listen to the families crying out for relief from gun violence. President Obama’s trip to Dallas yesterday was the 11th time he has spoken to a city in mourning after a mass shooting. The wrong people keep getting their hands on guns. And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind that the Dallas killer had, which allowed him to outgun the police. And the vast majority of gun owners agree: we have to come together around common sense steps to prevent gun violence. If we’re looking for common ground – this is common ground. And I hope that we will, from Washington, to Springfield to everywhere across America, come to agreement about that.

Now I understand that just saying these things together may upset some people. I’m talking about police reform just a few days after a horrific attack on police officers. I’m talking about courageous, honorable police officers just a few days after officer-involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota. I’m bringing up guns in a country where just talking about comprehensive background checks and getting assault weapons off our streets gets you demonized.

But all these things can be true at the same time.

We do need criminal justice reform to save lives and to make sure all Americans are treated as equals in rights and dignity. We do need to support our police departments that are trying to get it right, and honor the men and women who protect us every day. We do need to do more to stop gun violence. We may disagree about how to do these things, but surely we can all agree with those basic premises. And I hope and pray the past week has showed us how true they are.

Now, these are the issues on many of our minds right now. And if we stop there, that would leave us with plenty of work to do.

So I wish I could say that was everything that we must address.

But these events are taking place against a much broader backdrop of fear and anxiety. So I think we have to face all of it.

We do need to make sure our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top. The changes that have roiled our economy over the past few decades are not just numbers on a page that economists study. They are real forces that families are dealing with up close and personal every day.

Not long ago, I met with factory workers here in Illinois whose jobs are being sent abroad, and heard how painful the consequences have been for them and their families. I’ve talked to workers across our country who’ve seen good jobs lost to technologies, who keep being told to get more training – even though that often doesn’t lead to a good new job on the other end.

These economic disruptions have stripped too many people of their sense of security and dignity. And that can have devastating consequences. We have to ask ourselves, why are drug addiction and suicide on the rise in parts of our country? That’s not just about economics. It’s about something deeper, that is connected to economics: a sense of dislocation, even a pessimism about whether America still holds anything for them or cares about them at all.

That’s why I’ve pledged that in my first 100 days as President, we will make the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II. We need more jobs you can support a family on, especially in places that have been left out and left behind from Coal Country to Indian Country to inner cities, to every place that’s been hollowed out when a factory closed or a mine shut down because everyone in America deserves that ‘fair chance in the race of life’ that President Lincoln described.

Now, I realize that our politics have contributed to the sense of division many Americans feel right now. And as someone in the middle of a hotly fought political campaign, I cannot stand here and claim that my words and actions haven’t sometimes fueled the partisanship that often stands in the way of progress. So I recognize I have to do better too.

I’m running for President with the belief that we need to face up to these challenges and fix them in order to become a stronger, fairer country. And in times like these, we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.

And that is why I believe Donald Trump is so dangerous.

His campaign is as divisive as any we have seen in our lifetimes. It is built on stoking mistrust and pitting American against American. It’s there in everything he says and everything he promises to do as President.

It’s there in how he wants to ban Muslims from coming to the United States, and toyed with creating a database to track Muslims in America. It’s there in the way he demeans women, in his promotion of an anti-Semitic image pushed by neo-Nazis, and in the months that he spent trying to discredit the citizenship and legitimacy of our first black President. Last night in an interview, he said that he understands systemic bias against black people because – and I quote – ‘even against me, the system is rigged’ – unquote. He went on to say, ‘I can relate to it very much myself.’  Even this – the killing of people – is somehow all about him.

It’s there in his proposals on immigration. He says he’ll round up 11 million people and kick them out. He’s actually described a special deportation force that would go around America, pulling people out of their homes and workplaces, pulling children out of school. I got a letter from a mother the other day who said her adopted son asked her with a shaky voice if President Trump would send him back to Ethiopia. When kids are scared by political candidates and policy debates, it’s a sign something has gone badly wrong.

And we see it in the violence that Donald Trump encouraged toward protesters at his rallies, and the strange things he has said about the violence that will occur if we don’t elect him. He says that if he doesn’t win this November, we – and again I quote – ‘won’t even have a country anymore,’ America’s ‘not going to continue to survive.’  I do not know what he’s talking about. But I do know we don’t need that kind of fear-mongering – not now, not ever.

And he’s gone even further even than that. He has taken aim at some of our most cherished democratic values and institutions. He wants to revoke the citizenship of 4 million Americans born in this country to immigrant parents, and eliminate the bedrock principle enshrined in the 14th Amendment – that if you’re born in America, you’re a citizen of America. He said that a distinguished American, born in Indiana, a judge can’t be trusted to do his job because his parents were Mexican; he called him a ‘Mexican judge’ over and over again. He knew that the judge had been born in Indiana. But it was a cynical, calculated attempt to fan the flames of racial division. And designed to undermine people’s faith in our judicial system. Why would someone running for President want to do that?

And even that’s not all. He says, as Commander-in-Chief, he would order our troops to commit war crimes, and insisted they would follow his orders, even though that goes against decades of military training and the military code. He’s banished members of the press who have criticized him – is there any doubt he would do the same as President? Imagine if he had not just Twitter and cable news to go after his critics and opponents, but also the IRS – or for that matter, our entire military. Given what we have seen and heard, do any of us think he’d be restrained?

And he has shown contempt for and ignorance of our Constitution. Last week, he met with House Republicans in Washington to try to assuage their serious concerns about him. One member asked whether he’d protect Article I, which defines the separation of powers between Congress and the executive branch. Here’s the answer he reportedly gave: ‘I want to protect Article One, Article Two, Article Twelve.’ Well here’s the thing – there is no Article Twelve – not even close. That was a serious question, from an elected representative, and he either didn’t care enough to answer it seriously – or he didn’t know where to begin.

Even the most stalwart Republicans were alarmed by that. And well they, and we, should be.

The first thing a new President does is take an oath to ‘protect and defend’ the Constitution. To do that with any meaning, you’ve got to know what’s in it. And you’ve got to respect what’s in it.

I do wish Donald Trump would listen to other people once in awhile. He might actually learn something. But he’s made it clear – that’s not his thing. As he has said, he only listens to himself.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln. We are watching it become the Party of Trump. And that’s not just a huge loss for our democracy – it is a threat to it.

Because Donald Trump’s campaign adds up to an ugly, dangerous message to America. A message that you should be afraid – afraid of people whose ethnicity is different, or religious faith is different, or who were born in a different country or hold different political beliefs.

Make no mistake – there are things to fear in this world, and we need to be clear-eyed about them. But we are each other’s countrymen and women. We share this miraculous country. This land and its heritage is yours, mine and everyone’s – willing to pledge allegiance and understand the solemn responsibilities of American citizenship. That’s what ‘indivisible’ means – that big word that every grade school student knows – that we’re in this together, even if that’s not always easy.

So let’s think better of each other. Let’s hold together in the face of our challenges – not turn on each other or tear each other down.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to a dangerous job we need them to do.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of African Americans and Latinos, and try as best we can to imagine what it would be like if we had to have ‘the talk’ with our kids about how carefully they need to act because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or killed.

And yes, let’s put ourselves in the shoes of Donald Trump’s supporters. We may disagree on the causes and the solutions to the challenges we face – but I believe like anyone else, they’re trying to figure out their place in a fast-changing America. They want to know how to make a good living and how to give their kids better futures and opportunities. That’s why we’ve got to reclaim the promise of America for all our people – no matter who they vote for.

And let’s be more than allies to each other. Let’s take on each other’s struggles as our own.

My life’s work is built on the conviction that we are stronger together. Not separated into factions or sides. Not shouting over each other, but together. Our economy is stronger when everyone contributes to it, and everyone can benefit from the work they do. Our communities are stronger when we all pull together to solve our problems and restore our faith in each other, and by doing so in the promise of America. Our country is stronger when we work with our friends and allies to promote peace, prosperity, and security around the world.

This is an idea that goes back to the founding of America, when 13 separate colonies found a way – despite their differences – to join together as one nation. They knew they were not stronger on their own, and neither are we.

I’ve had the great delight of seeing the musical “Hamilton.” And I hope more people at least get a chance to listen to the score and to hear the words. There’s a great song by the character playing George Washington who sings, ‘History’s eyes are on us.’ That was true then, and that’s true today.

If we do this right, and if we have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become stronger still – like steel tempered by fire. Now don’t get me wrong, fierce debates are part of who we are – they started at my dinner table with my father, and have continued ever since. It is who we are. You’re reminded of that when you read history, when you think about the Lincoln-Douglas Debates. Debate over the right way forward.

And sometimes we have to balance competing values like freedom and order, justice and security, these are complementary values of American life. That isn’t easy. Previous generations have had to overcome terrible challenges. And no one more so than Abraham Lincoln. But in the end, if we do the work, we will cease to be divided. We, in fact, will be indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

And we will remain – in Lincoln’s words – the last, best hope of earth.

Thank you all very much.”

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Hillary Clinton’s Commitment: A Debt-Free Future for America’s Graduates

Education is the key to so much we want to achieve as a country:  a stronger, more equitable economy; a healthier, more vibrant democracy; a future in which we meet challenges with ingenuity and skill.  Education is also the key to our young people achieving their dreams.  It’s how we develop our talents and imagine different futures for ourselves.  So any serious plan for America’s future must include a bold plan to put quality education – including college – within everyone’s reach, no matter how much money they have.

College used to be pretty affordable.  For millions of Americans, that’s not the case anymore. Too many families in the United States are struggling with student debt, and the problem has reached crisis levels. Within the last ten years, total student debt in our economy has more than doubled and now exceeds $1.2 trillion. Nearly 7 out of every 10 new graduates of four-year colleges are in debt, and these indebted graduates carry an average balance of nearly $30,000. Student debt has surpassed credit card debt, car loan debt, and home equity lines of credit to be the second largest source of consumer debt.

And this is not just an issue for borrowers: It is holding our economy back. This debt prevents people from forming families, buying homes, and starting small businesses. If you plan on starting a new business then review Sky Blue vs Lexington law breakdown. It sends the wrong signal to future students whom we need to complete college to drive economic growth.

Meanwhile, for families sending their kids to colleges and universities, tuition has ballooned out of control and has become increasingly unaffordable even at public colleges and universities.  Tuition has risen 40% in the last ten years at four-year public colleges and universities, after inflation, while family incomes have remained basically flat.  And states have been cutting their spending on higher education – by roughly 20% per student since the recession – rather than expanding their investments.

Simply put, this situation has careened out of control.  Hillary Clinton has a plan to help millions of Americans with their debt right now, and a plan to make college debt-free for future generations.

Provide Immediate Help to Graduates Who Need Relief from Crushing Debt Hillary has made clear she will fight to ensure that all borrowers can:

  • Refinance their student loans at current rates, just as borrowers can refinance a car or home loan. Refinancing would help 25 million borrowers across the country, with the typical borrower saving $2,000 over the life of the loan.
  • Enroll in income-based repayment. Nobody should have to pay more than 10 percent of monthly income, and college debt should be forgiven after 20 years – and 10 years if a borrower works in the public interest. Hillary will simplify, expand and develop options for automatic enrollment in these programs.
  • Push employers to contribute to student debt relief. Employers must be part of the solution to the student debt crisis. Clinton will create a payroll deduction portal for employers and employees that will simplify the repayment process. She will explore further options to encourage employers to help pay down student debt.
  • Get relief from debt for starting a business or social enterprise.  Aspiring entrepreneurs will be able to defer their loans with no payments or interest for up to three years so that student debt and the lack of family wealth is not a barrier to innovation in our country. For social entrepreneurs and those starting new enterprises in distressed communities, her plan will provide up to $17,500 in loan forgiveness.
  • Reward public service.  AmeriCorps members who complete two years of national service and a year of public service can have their loans forgiven.  Teachers who teach in high-need areas or in subjects with teacher shortages – such as computer science or special education – will get enhanced loan forgiveness.
A Moratorium on Student Debt to Get Millions of Borrowers Relief from Crushing Debt: Today, Hillary Clinton is announcing that she will take immediate executive action to offer a three-month moratorium on student loan payments to all federal loan borrowers. During this time-out from paying student loans, every borrower will be given the resources and targeted help they need to save money on their loans. With dedicated assistance from the Department of Education during this moratorium, borrowers will be able to consolidate their loans, sign up quickly and easily for income-based repayment plans, and take direct advantage of opportunities to reduce monthly interest payments and fees. Borrowers who are delinquent or in default will receive additional rehabilitation options to help them get back on their feet. Clinton will also use the moratorium to crack down on for-profit colleges and loan servicers who have too often taken advantage of borrowers – and to ensure that borrowers can resolve outstanding issues in a timely and fair manner.

Debt-Free College for our Future Students

Hillary Clinton has pledged to achieve the goal of debt-free college for future graduates, so that cost is never a barrier for young people seeking to pursue their dreams of higher education (click here for more details).  It’s a simple, but bold idea:  Every student should be able to graduate from a public college or university in their state without taking on any student debt.  To reach this goal, Hillary is enhancing the New College Compact she announced last year.  Her plan will:

  • Eliminate college tuition for working families. Families with income up to $125,000 will pay no tuition at in-state public colleges and universities – covering more than 80 percent of all families. From the start of this plan, every student from a family making $85,000 a year or less will be able to go to a 4-year public college or university tuition free. This income threshold will increase by $10,000 a year every year over the next four years so that by 2021, all students with a family income of $125,000 will have the opportunity to pay no tuition. She will also continue her commitment to ensure that community colleges are tuition-free for all working families.
  • Help students deal with all of the costs of attending college.  Hillary Clinton will protect Pell Grant funding to help low- and middle-income students pay non-tuition expenses, and she will restore year-round Pell Grant funding so that students have the necessary support they need to take summer classes and meet their goal of completing college.  She will make a major investment in HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions and other low-cost, modest-endowment private schools so that these deserving students also benefit from the lower cost of college. She will work to expand opportunities for students to earn money for expenses through term-time work and to receive college credit for national service. She will expand support for student-parents, including a fifteen-fold increase in federal funding for on-campus child care.

The New College Compact: Hillary Clinton’s plan requires everyone to do their part.  The federal government will make a major new investment to make this possible, but states will have to step up and meet their obligations as well.

States will have to commit to a combination of reinvestment and reform over the next four years and beyond to ensure that federal support is funding students and not excessive cost growth.

  • Colleges and universities will be accountable for reining in costs to provide value to their students; improving completion rates and learning outcomes; and doing more to provide students from disadvantaged backgrounds with the tools they need to reach college and succeed once they get there.
  • Students will be expected to work 10 hours a week to help defray the full cost of attendance. Clinton will push to expand work opportunities that build career skills and introduce students of all backgrounds to public service careers.
  • As part of this New College Compact, Hillary will encourage and reward innovators who design imaginative new ways of providing valuable higher education to students while driving down costs.  And she will crack down on the abusive practices of for-profit colleges that defraud taxpayers while burdening students with debt for educational programs of no value.

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This video is slightly longer and ends with Hillary’s brief statement on the release of the Republican Benghazi Committee Report.

Hillary Clinton Tours Galvanize in Denverublican

Following a tour on Tuesday at Galvanize—a tech workforce training facility and community for businesses in Denver—Hillary Clinton unveiled a comprehensive technology and innovation agenda to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. As part of an ongoing conversation to create more jobs and build a stronger economy that helps us grow together, Clinton highlighted three specific goals to realize these visions:

1) Help young people become entrepreneurs by letting them defer their federal student loans for up to three years; 2) Provide every student in America access to computer science education before graduation; and 3) Connect every household in the U.S. to high-speed internet service by 2020.

Pointing to Donald Trump’s lack of a real job creation strategy and steady vision for the economy, Clinton said, “I want America to get back in the future business.  Saying that you want to make America ‘great again’ is code for saying, we want to go back to the way it used to be, forget about technology, forget about inclusivity, forget about giving everybody an opportunity to have a real shot at the best possible future. Well, that is not who we are as Americans; we don’t go back, we go forward, but we’ve got to go forward with intelligence and a real sense of purpose.”

Clinton will also travel to Los Angeles on Tuesday to participate in a live town hall with 100 online content creators and digital influencers. The moderated Q&A session will allow Clinton to address issues important to these influencers’ online audiences—and emphasize her plan to promote young entrepreneurs.

Below is a transcript of Clinton’s remarks in Denver today:

“Thank you, thank you.  Well, first let me say, I am blown away and really happy to be here, and I wish each and every one of you the very best as you become not only galvanizers, but entrepreneurs, and innovators, and business leaders in every way.

I want to thank Jim for letting me come and visit one of these campuses of Galvanize.  I really am taken by the model, and want to do everything I can to lift it up and create more pathways for more people to have these opportunities.  I want to thank Stephanie, who came from Governor Hickenlooper’s staff to be part of this.  And I had a chance to visit with the governor earlier, and was talking about the workforce planning that is going on here in Colorado.  It’s a real model for the rest of the country creating all of these pathways to give people the skills that are needed in the 21st century economy.

Julie Anne Lerner, thank you very much for the exciting work that Pan Exchange is doing.  I know just a little bit about commodities – and their trading, their buying, their selling – both futures and the actual commodities themselves.  And what you are doing, Julie, is just transformational, because for most of the world, the agricultural workers are women.  More than 60 percent of the farmers in the world are women who farm small plots and who do not have access to information.

Very often, until cellphones came with SMS still, to get some kind of weather reports, they didn’t even know what the weather would be – couldn’t plan.  They don’t have access to good seed or pesticides by and large, and what we’re doing through this kind of effort is opening up markets, creating more transparency which will benefit so many of the people who are actually doing the hard work of producing food and trying to get it to market, and create a better life for themselves, their families, and their communities.  So, I’m thrilled by that.

And I want to thank Josh Anderson, CEO of Patriot Boot Camp, for working on another set of challenges, and that is how we do a much, much better job creating employment pathways for our vets – something that I have spent a lot of time thinking about and working on.  There are good ideas out there, but they’re not yet broad enough, deep enough, so that we are really doing what we should to give our vets the chance to have a good future.  It needs to start as – I was just talking to Josh and Ben about – it needs to start while they’re still in the military, before they leave.  We don’t do a good enough job with transition planning.  And then we’ve got to do more to get them connected with successful programs that produce results as opposed to being scammed, which happens too often at the programs that they are looking at, or enticed into being part of, without really any employment at the end of it.

So, using Patriot Boot Camp as an example, and giving the results that you’ve had, gives me a lot of hope that we can do a much better job for our vets.  And that’s something that I am 100 percent committed to.  I am so excited about being here.

Now, I do plead guilty to being a policy wonk, and I know that can be boring, and I know that putting out plans can sometimes seem less than inspirational, but it really matters what we do and how we do it, if we’re going to create the economy of the future.  And it matters to me to find examples – like here at Galvanize – that we can lift up and try to take to scale.  I was delighted to learn that there will soon be a Galvanize in New York, and that we will have the benefit of that.

So I am on a mission to find out what works – not what we hope will work, because we’ll get to that – but what works right now, and how we do more of it, and how we create a lot more of this kind of model, because what we’ve been doing is not sufficient.  It doesn’t really produce the results we want for the vast majority of young Americans, or even mid-career Americans coming out of the military, changing jobs in the civilian workplace.   So this is part of a pioneering community, and you all are part of that, and I am thrilled to see what you’re accomplishing.

I know across Colorado, you have made smart investments in technology and innovation that’s helping to create a lot of good-paying jobs.  It’s not an accident that Denver, and Colorado in general, have a lower than average unemployment rate, because there are opportunities here, there are magnets of jobs and futures that people are drawn by, and we’re going to continue to build on that.  I learned that nearly a quarter of the people in and around Denver and Colorado Springs now work in STEM fields.  So that is what we are trying to help create elsewhere.  The rest of the country could learn a lot about what’s working here.

I want America to get back in the future business.  Saying that you want to make America ‘great again’ is code for saying, ‘We want to go back to the way it used to be, forget about technology, forget about inclusivity, forget about giving everybody an opportunity to have a real shot at the best possible future.’ Well, that is not who we are as Americans; we don’t go back, we go forward, but we’ve got to go forward with intelligence and a real sense of purpose.

So my goal is, we build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, and that’s why today, I am releasing a comprehensive plan to keep America on the cutting edge of technology and innovation.  It is one of our biggest assets, and I want it to be democratized.  I want more people in more places to feel that their future lies in STEM, in technology, in helping to create the jobs that we’re going to attract.

So first, let’s make it easier for young people to become entrepreneurs – exactly what’s going on here at Galvanize.  I’ve talked to a lot of people in the field, and starting out can be daunting.  There’s a lot of risk, even if you’ve got a good idea – how you translate that into a business, how you grow that business, how you make a living from it.  It can be a lot harder if you’re juggling student loan payments, and that can cut into what you’re able to do, what kind of risk you think you can take.

So we’re going to help people with student loans refinance their loans to lower rates, and then we’re going to let young people who want to start something new defer your federal student loan payments for up to three years, so you won’t pay a dime on whatever loans you have for three years. And we want to go even further, so if you get that enterprise up and going, we want to forgive a portion of your debt because you’ve become a job creator, and we need more job creators, and we need more young people starting business, startups, and other kinds of opportunities.  So the burden of student debt is not only an individual burden that affects your life choices, it’s an economic burden.  $1.2 trillion in student debt – think of how more productive that money could be spent.  So this is going to be one of our priorities.

Second, we have to make sure every student in America – no matter what ZIP code that student lives in – gets the chance to learn computer science before they graduate from high school. Those are skills you know so well – you’re here at Galvanize – that will help you compete and succeed in the global economy.

When I used to visit schools as First Lady of Arkansas, First Lady of the United States – a long time ago – I would have what I called ‘the Chelsea test.’  In other words, would I send Chelsea to this school?  And some were a resounding ‘yes’ – the creativity, the energy, the collaboration – and some were absolutely not, and no child should go to these schools.

So now, I’m a grandmother, so I have the Charlotte and Aidan test.  Would I send these precious grandchildren to any of these schools that I visit? There is such a divide, it’s heartbreaking.  Some of you may have had schools where you really got exposed to technology, where you had a chance to both learn on your own and be guided in your learning, but I bet a lot of you didn’t.  We can no longer tolerate that.  Part of what we have to do, though, is make sure that the benefits of technology and the internet are widely shared.  It’s hard to believe, but we still have lots of parts of our country – rural and urban – where you do not have access to high-speed internet. In fact, it’s spotty and it is a economic impediment.

I’ve traveled a lot around our country and you can see what it means not to be connected with the global economy. And I’m thrilled whenever I see places that are historically left out finding ways to get in. So in eastern Kentucky earlier this year, I learned about a successful program that trains former coalminers to be computer programmers, but the lack of affordable, high-speed broadband is a real barrier.  So I intend to make sure we do what we did with electricity in my grandparents’ generation – we connect every home and business in America to high-speed internet, and we do it on as fast a timescale as possible, no later than the early 2020s because every year we waste means we leave people behind and left out in a way that is heartbreaking and wrong.

Now, I really believe part of what this election will turn on is how we’re going to create more good jobs with rising incomes, and there’s a lot of legitimate anxiety, fear and even anger in many parts of our country, because people feel like the economy has failed them – they haven’t recovered from the Great Recession; government has failed them – because they haven’t been a good partner in helping people find their footing in going forward.  So I think this is going to be one of the defining issues in this election, and I’m going to keep talking about what we can do together – a positive vision that, if we do it, will give so many more people life yourselves a chance to be galvanizers.  And I’m going to talk about why we need to get back into the future business, because that’s who we are as Americans.  I don’t think we’re people who look backwards.  We should be looking forward.  And we’re going to focus on what will make the American economy work for everyone, not just those at the top.

So coming here today is a real treat for me because it’s exactly what I want to see everywhere, and it is something that I also want to be sure is available to every American, and somehow we’re going to have to work to make that so, and that has to start in schools, and it has to start with people believing that every kid can be a part of the future – not just some of us, but every single one of us.

So thank you for really being part of this future that we have to create.  It is something that I care deeply about, and I wish you all well.  I think it’s great you are here being not only interested in your own future, but helping to build a learning community for technology, as the sign says.  And I look forward, Jim, to keep hearing more about what you’re doing, why it works, and what more we can do to help you.  I’ve already gotten some good ideas from the folks I’ve talked to today about what more we can do to make this work for more people, but let me have a chance to just shake some hands and greet you all, as many as I can before I have to leave.  But again, it’s a thrill to be here and I wish you all the very best.  Thank you very much.”

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After joining Elizabeth Warren to bust open the general election campaign in Cincinnati in the morning, Hillary went to Chicago to keynote the Rainbow PUSH Coalition’s International Women’s Luncheon where she talked gun violence.

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Today’s heartbreaking immigration ruling could tear apart 5 million families facing deportation. We must do better. -H

Hillary Clinton Statement on Texas v. United States

Today, following the Supreme Court’s deadlocked decision in Texas v. United States, Hillary Clinton issued the following statement:

 

“Today’s deadlocked decision from the Supreme Court is unacceptable, and shows us all just how high the stakes are in this election. As I have consistently said, I believe that President Obama acted well within his constitutional and legal authority in issuing the DAPA and DACA executive actions. These are our friends and family members; neighbors and classmates; DREAMers and parents of Americans and lawful permanent residents. They enrich our communities and contribute to our economy every day. We should be doing everything possible under the law to provide them relief from the specter of deportation.

“Today’s decision by the Supreme Court is purely procedural and casts no doubt on the fact that DAPA and DACA are entirely within the President’s legal authority. But in addition to throwing millions of families across our country into a state of uncertainty, this decision reminds us how much damage Senate Republicans are doing by refusing to consider President Obama’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court. Our families and our country need and deserve a full bench, and Senate Republicans need to stop playing political games with our democracy and give Judge Merrick Garland a fair hearing and vote.

“This decision is also a stark reminder of the harm Donald Trump would do to our families, our communities, and our country. Trump has pledged to repeal President Obama’s executive actions on his first day in office. He has called Mexican immigrants ‘rapists’ and ‘murderers.’ He has called for creating a deportation force” to tear 11 million people away from their families and their homes.

“I believe we are stronger together. When we embrace immigrants, not denigrate them. When we build bridges, not walls. That is why, as president, I will continue to defend DAPA and DACA, and do everything possible under the law to go further to protect families. It is also why I will introduce comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship within my first 100 days. Because when families are strong—America is strong.”

 

 

This has been published and shared across social media and concerned sites like https://www.application-filing-service.com/socialsecuritycard/replacement-social-security-card-child/. In these uncertain times, we need everyone to stay together and strong.

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Hillary outlined her plan for the economy in Raleigh following an earlier speech by Donald Trump about her. Hillary’s team was quick to fact check his words and point out the hypocrisy.

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Too many corporations seem to have forgotten: It’s wrong to take taxpayer dollars with one hand and give out pink slips with the other.

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Every American willing to work hard should be able to find a job that pays enough to support a family.

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“The heart of my plan will be the biggest investment in American infrastructure in decades.” —Hillary

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We’re going to invest $20 billion specifically to create jobs for young people, especially in communities of color.

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We should support our teachers, not scapegoat them.

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“I will make it a national priority for more companies to share profits with employees. On top of, not instead of, good wages.” —Hillary

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We’ll make companies that ship jobs overseas give back tax breaks they received here at home.

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“Progress is possible … I know Republicans and Democrats can work together, because I’ve done it.” —Hillary

Instead of pitting people against each other, we need to enlist everyone in building our country together.

Hillary Clinton Delivers Remarks on the Economy in Raleigh

In a forward-looking policy address in Raleigh, North Carolina on Wednesday, Hillary Clinton explained how, as president, she will build an economy that works for everyone—not just those at the top. Clinton outlined five specific goals to realize this vision:

1) Pass the biggest investment in good-paying jobs since World War II in her first 100 days; 2) Make debt-free college education available to all Americans; 3) Let workers share in the profits they help create; 4) Ensure Wall Street and the wealthiest Americans pay their fair share; and 5) Put families first and match our policies to how they actually live and work in the 21st century.

Below is a transcript of Clinton’s remarks today:

“Thank you, It’s great to be back in Raleigh! Thank you so much. I have to confess I was having such a good time backstage listening to the 120 Minutes Band, listening to Mary Wingate do the national anthem and just being absolutely transported by Shay Taylor and Friends, the gospel group that got us all going today. And I cannot thank a better twosome than the people you just saw up here.

Because I honestly believe Jim Hunt is not only one of the best governors North Carolina has ever had, but one of the best governors ever in America in the last years. And what he did to really put North Carolina on a path to the future has stood the test of time. We’ve had a few glitches with others who don’t seem to understand what the ingredients are for building an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. But Jim Hunt knows that.

I look forward to continuing to work with him. And I was so delighted to have a chance, as I did, to have Alicia Wilkerson talk about her journey, how hard she has worked, raising her children, getting an education, making it possible for her to have a better future.

I so greatly appreciate her mentioning the SCHIP program which has helped 8 million kids every year get health insurance. Now because we are in North Carolina and we have a lot of friends here I want to acknowledge some of them. Your Secretary of State Elaine Marshall.

Senator Dan Blue, the Minority Leader of the North Carolina Senate. Representative Larry Hall, the Democratic leader of the North Carolina House of Representatives. Linda Coleman running for Lieutenant Governor. Judge Mike Morgan running against a Republican Supreme Court incumbent. And don’t forget than Dan Blue III is running for State Treasurer. Josh Stein, running for Attorney General. And let’s give a big round of applause to your next governor, Attorney General Roy Cooper! Your next AG commissioner Walter Smith and your next United States Senator, Debra Ross. We’re going to work hard in the this election to elect as many Democrats up and down the ticket so that North Carolina can get back on the path to the path to the future, get off this detour that you’ve been on.

I have to start by saying if you notice anything different about me today, it could be that now I have double the ‘grandmother glow.’ This past weekend, Chelsea and Marc had a little boy and we’re all totally over the moon about it.

Obviously, our family will do everything we can to make sure little Charlotte and now little Aidan grow up with every possible opportunity. I know that’s what every parent and grandparent, aunt or uncle, godmother and godfather, people who care about the children in our lives, that’s exactly how we all feel.

I believe with all my heart that you should not have to be the grandchild of a former President or Secretary of State to have every opportunity available to you in this country.

Every single child deserves the chance to live up to his or her God-given potential and that has been the cause of my life.

It’s rooted in the values I learned from my family and my faith. We’re all in this together. And we have a responsibility to lift each other up.

As we Methodists say: do all the good you can to all the people you can in all the ways you can. And that is absolutely true for our children.

That’s why I got into public service in the first place. And it’s why I’m determined that we will win this election.

I think it’s an understatement to say that Americans face a choice in November.

As I said yesterday in Ohio, Donald Trump offers no real solutions for the economic challenges we face – he just continues to spout reckless ideas that will run up our debt and cause another economic crash.

I’m here today to offer an alternative. I have a clear vision for the economy, and it’s this: We need to make sure our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top.

Not just for the rich or the well-connected, not just for people living in some parts of the country, or people from certain backgrounds and not others – I mean everyone.

I have a plan to get us there: Five steps we can take together to drive growth that’s strong, fair, and lasting. Growth that reduces inequality, increases upward mobility; that reaches into every corner of our country.

The measure of our success will be how much incomes rise for hardworking families. How many children are lifted out of poverty. How many Americans can find good jobs that support a middle class life and not only that, jobs that provide a sense of dignity and pride. That’s what it means to have an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. That’s the mission, and I’m asking all of you to join me in it.

We have to overcome some big challenges. I will admit that,

First, too many of our representatives in Washington are in the grips of a failed economic theory called trickle-down economics. I do not question their sincerity, but it has been proven wrong again and again.

But there are still people in Congress who insist on cutting taxes for the wealthy instead of investing in our future.

They careen from one self-inflicted crisis to another – shutting down the government, threatening to default on our national debt, refusing to make the common-sense investments that used to have broad bipartisan support, like rebuilding our roads and our bridges, our tunnels, our highways and airports, or investing in better education from zero through high school and college.

I like to look at evidence: I plead to that. I think evidence is important when making decisions that affect other people’s lives. If the evidence were there to support this ideology, I would have to acknowledge that, but we have seen the results. Twice now in the past 30 years a Republican president has caused an economic mess and a Democratic president has had to come in and clean it up.

And yes, too many special interests and too many lobbyists have stood in the way of progress while protecting the perks of the privileged few.

It’s not just Washington.

Too many corporations have embraced policies that favor hedge funds and other big shareholders and top management at the expense of their workers, communities, and even their long-term value.

They’re driven by Wall Street’s obsession with short-term share prices and quarterly earnings.

A recent survey of corporate executives found that more than half when asked would hold off on making a successful long-term investment — maybe in their workers, or plant equipment, or research — if it meant missing a target in the next earnings report.

So corporations stash cash overseas or they send it to top shareholders in the form of stock buybacks or dividends, instead of raising wages or investing in research and development.

This pressure, this short term pressure, leads to perverse incentives and outrageous behavior.

It is wrong to take taxpayer dollars with one hand and give out pink slips with the other hand. And no company should be moving their headquarters overseas, just to avoid paying their taxes here at home.

In addition, there have been big changes in how American families live, learn, and work, but our policies haven’t kept up.

There are so many examples of this.

Over the past several decades, women have entered the workforce and boosted our economy, yet we are the only, the only developed country that doesn’t provide paid family leave of any kind.

We’re asking families to rely on an old system of supports in a new economic reality. No wonder so many are struggling.

The bottom line is that too many leaders in business and government have lost sight of our shared responsibility to each other and to our nation.

They let Wall Street take big risks with unregulated financial activities, they skew our tax code toward the wealthy, they failed to enforce our trade rules, they undermined workers’ rights.

They have forgotten that we are all in this together and we are at our best when we recognize that. Excessive inequality such as we have today reduces economic growth. Markets work best when all the stakeholders share in the benefits.

The challenges we face are significant.

It is not easy to change Washington, or how corporations behave. It takes more than stern words or a flashy slogan – it takes a plan.

It takes experience and the ability to work with both parties to get results.

That means we need a President who knows what we’re up against, has no illusions about what we need to do to move ahead, but can actually get it done. And that is what I am offering.

Because there is good news. The good news is that everywhere I go, smart, determined men and women are working hard to reverse these trends.

Mayors are pioneering innovative ways to work with the private sector to invest in their cities.

Entrepreneurs and small businesses are building and hiring in places that bigger companies have abandoned.

Unions are providing training programs that add value to the companies that employ their members.

Union pension funds are already investing in infrastructure projects that have supported more than 100,000 jobs here in our country.

So do not grow weary, there are great ideas out there. And we are going to be partners in a big, bold effort to increase economic growth and distribute it more fairly.

To build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. I believe the federal government should adopt five ambitious goals:

First, let’s break through the dysfunction in Washington to make the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II.

Second, let’s make college debt-free for all. And transform the way we prepare Americans for the jobs of the future.

Third, let’s rewrite the rules so more companies share profits with their

employees, and fewer ship profits and jobs overseas.

Finally, let’s make sure that Wall Street, corporations, and the super-rich pay their fair share of taxes. And all of this depends upon putting our families first and matching our policies to how you actually live and work in the 21st century.

Briefly about these four points: Let’s start with jobs.

Every American willing to work hard should be able to find a job that pays enough to support a family. And I know we can do this because I’ve seen it in the past.

You know, I remember when I was growing up and America had come out from the upheaval of depression and world war. Our leaders worked together to invest in a new foundation for American power and prosperity.

Highways to connect up our entire nation. College and housing for returning veterans and their families. Unprecedented scientific research. And it worked – we built the greatest middle class the world has ever known.

Now, we have to get as ambitious again. There is nothing we can’t do. Let’s be just as ambitious to build our 21st century American economy to produce the same results for hard working Americans.

In my first 100 days as President, I will work with both parties to pass a comprehensive plan to create the next generation of good jobs. Now the heart of my plan will be the biggest investment in American infrastructure in decades, including establishing an infrastructure bank that will bring private sector dollars off the sidelines and put them to work here.

And I’ve talked with local leaders around America and I’ve seen the dire need for investment. In Tampa, for example, I saw how a smart, targeted highway investment near a major port can create thousands of good-paying jobs, support the local economy and unlock national commerce.

We can create millions of good-paying jobs while preparing America to compete and win in the global economy.

So let’s set these big national goals. And I know how important it is to rebuild our roads, our bridges and our airports, but we have more work to do. Let’s build better. And let’s connect every household to broadband by the year 2020.

Let’s build a cleaner, more resilient power grid with enough renewable energy to power every home in the country. Let’s fix failing water systems like the one that poisoned children in Flint, Michigan. Let’s renovate our public schools so every child in every community has access to safe, high-tech classrooms, laboratories, and libraries.

Our 100 Days jobs package will also include transformational investments in key drivers of growth:

Advance manufacturing, so we can ‘make it in America’ and compete and win in the global economy.

Making America the clean energy superpower of the 21st century, which will create millions of jobs and help protect our planet.

Recommitting to scientific research, which can create new whole industries, just like we did in the 90’s when we started mapping the human genome.

And small businesses, which should be the engine for creating new jobs across America, they need to be free of red tape and they need to have access to credit. We need to slash unnecessary regulations making it easier to get startup capital from community banks and credit unions. If you have an idea for a small business, we want you to get started.

Let’s free entrepreneurs to do what they do best – innovate and grow and hire and make sure that the new service and caregiving jobs being created today are jobs that pay well, too. And that does mean raising the national minimum wage.

So many of these are so personal to us that they need to be respected and lifted up. And I know too that we’ve got work to do to stand with those who are fighting for raising the minimum wage. It’s not always how we think about this, but I can tell you another engine for growth and job creation would be comprehensive immigration reform.

It will bring millions of workers into the formal economy so you don’t have an unlevel playing field, so that workers who are competing for those jobs don’t get undercut because employers go out and find undocumented workers to do those jobs for a lower wage. I really believe it’s not just the right thing to do, but it will be great.

It will be smart for our economy. I want people to be able to compete. I don’t want to have that disadvantage that exists in too many places, where people are being are being priced out of the jobs they’ve always done.

So we can work toward a full employment and full potential economy. That does mean we can’t ignore people that are still stuck on the sidelines, or working part-time when what they really want is a full-time job. Or those trapped in long-term joblessness, whether they’re veterans, workers with disabilities, people coming home from prison, or young people who tried to start their careers in the midst of the Great Recession. I particularly want young people to feel that they are going to get good jobs that will give them that ladder of opportunity that they deserve to have in America.

That’s why I want to expand incentives like the New Markets Tax Credit, Empowerment Zones, and other ideas that bring business, government, and communities together to create good jobs in poor or remote areas. Places that have lost a factory or a mine where generations of families used to work. Anyone willing to work should get the help they need to qualify for and find that good job.

That means breaking down the barriers of systemic racism and discrimination that hold back – those barriers, they hold back African Americans, Latinos, Asian and Native Americans, and women from fully participating in our economy.

We need to reverse the long-term neglect that has dried up jobs and opportunity in communities of color, in poor communities. It’s not by accident that the unemployment rate now among black Americans is twice as high as among whites. Back in the 90’s, we were closing that gap, incomes were going up for everybody.

I think we’re going to have to invest money to create jobs for young people because right now I’m worried that if young people don’t get that first job when they are young, learn about work, understand the obligations as well as the promise of work, it will be even more difficult to get them into the workforce later on.

It is way past time for us to guarantee equal pay for women, which is still not the reality.

So, you see it is not enough to have an affirmative agenda, we have to knock down those barriers.

And by the way, as you’ve seen here in North Carolina discriminating against LGBT Americans is bad for business.

And make no mistake, we will defend American jobs and American workers by saying ‘no’ to bad trade deals and unfair trade practices, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which does not meet my high bar for creating good-paying jobs. ‘No’ to assaults on the right to organize and bargain collectively.

‘No’ to every attack on the dignity of working families.

We’re going to make this economy work for everyone, and it’s time we start building this from the ground up. For every home and every community all the way to Washington. Now, I know very well that if you don’t have the skills for the jobs oftomorrow, it’s going to be difficult. Education is still the pathway for greater opportunities for many Americans.

Let’s start at the beginning with making quality, affordable childcare and pre-school available in every community in the next 10 years, so we get our littlest Americans off to the best start.

Jim Hunt was a pioneer in this. Why did he care so much about children zero to five, besides the fact that he cared about them? Because he knew there was a direct line to how the youngest children were treated, educated, and prepared for school, and what kind of jobs and economic competitiveness North Carolina would have. So we’re going to start by having families be their child’s first teachers, and we’re going to give them the support they need to do that. And when it comes to primary and secondary education I pledged to you we’re going to make sure all our kids have good teachers and good schools, no matter what zip code you live in.

You know, for many years, thanks to people and leaders like Jim Hunt, North Carolina was a leading state when it came to education. Now, unfortunately, thanks to your Governor McCrory and the legislature, the average teacher salary can barely support a family. It should not be a surprise that thousands have quit in recent years.

We should support our teachers, not scapegoat them.

And then let’s make sure every student has options after high school. Whether it’s a four-year degree, free community college, an apprenticeship, or other forms of higher education We need to provide the skills and credentials that match the job openings of today and tomorrow.

That’s why I’m proposing new tax credits to encourage more companies to offer paid apprenticeships that lets you earn while you learn. And I will to support the union apprenticeships and training programs already out there. Not every good job requires a four-year college degree. We need to dignify skills training. So many young people have the talent and the will to succeed – they just need a helping hand.

That’s why I want us to come together to help our young people break free from the burden of student debt. I’m sure we all have stories. I’ve met so many who told me they can’t start a business. They can’t even move out of their parent’s basement because of all the student debt holding them back.

Let’s set the goal to make debt-free college available to everyone. So future students won’t have to borrow a dime to pay for tuition at public college or university.

And let’s liberate the millions of Americans who already have student debt by making it easier to refinance, just like a mortgage. Let’s make it easier to have debt forgiven by doing national service, let’s make it easier to repay what you owe as a portion of your income so you never have to pay more than you can afford.

I’ve set out a way to do this, and we’ll be talking more about it as we go forward in this campaign.

My third goal is to rewrite the rules so more companies share profits with employees, and fewer ship profits and jobs overseas.

I know there are a lot of businesses thriving here in North Carolina and across our country who see employees as assets to invest in, not costs to cut. They’re building companies, not stripping them. They’re creating good jobs, not eliminating them.

But too many, too many businesses take the opposite view. I’m not asking corporations to be more charitable, although I think that is important. I’m asking corporations to realize that when more Americans prosper, they prosper too, right? When your paycheck grows, America grows.

We are a 70 percent consumption economy. If we want higher growth, we have to raise incomes. So people have more disposable dollars to be able to spend, instead of holding back out of fear of what will happen.

So let’s bring a long-term view back to board rooms and executive suites. Let’s restore the link between productivity growth and wage growth.

As President, I will make it a national priority for more companies to share profits with employees. On top of, not instead of, good wages. Let’s recognize the people doing the work, putting in the hours, they’re the ones who should be sharing the rewards.

We should continue to crack down on wage theft and make overtime count, so companies that pay well can’t be undercut by competitors paying poverty wages.

I believe we should strengthen unions, which have formed the bedrock of a strong middle class. It should be easier to bargain collectively. That’s not only fair, it makes workers more productive, it strengthens our economy.

And let’s close the loopholes that help companies ship jobs and profits overseas. Let’s make companies that outsource jobs to other countries pay back the tax breaks they received while they were here in America. And if corporations try to move their headquarters to a foreign country to skip out on their tax bills – let’s slap a new exit tax on them and then put that money to work in the communities left behind.

And we should extend the rules that were passed in Dodd-Frank on Wall Street after the crisis and strengthen them — both for the big banks and the shadow banking system. And I will veto any reforms to repeal those rules and vigorously enforce the law, with accountability, so Wall Street can never wreck Main Street again.

Fourth, let’s make sure Wall Street, corporations, and the super-rich pay their fair share of taxes.

When people say the game is rigged, the best evidence is the tax code. It’s riddled with scams, loopholes, and special breaks, like the carried interest loophole that lets some hedge fund managers pay a lower tax rate than a teacher or a nurse. That’s not only unfair, it’s bad economics, and we’re going to stop it.

I have been saying that for years. As President, if Congress won’t act, I will ask the Treasury Department to use its authority to close that loophole.

And here’s another idea that I will be pushing: Let’s pass the so-called Buffett Rule so top executives can’t pay a lower rate than their secretaries.

And let’s ask the wealthiest Americans to pay more – including a new tax on multimillionaires. That’s not only the right thing to do, it’s smart for our economy.

Because these steps will help pay for the investments we need in jobs and education without increasing our national debt. In fact, every program I have proposed in this campaign, I tell you how I will pay for it. Donald Trump and I disagree on a lot of things, and one of them is simple math.

Finally, here’s our fifth goal: Let’s put families first and make sure our policies match how you actually work and live in the 21st century.

Families look a lot different today than they did 30 years ago, and so do our jobs.

The movement of women into the workforce has produced enormous economic growth over the past few decades. But with women now the sole or primary breadwinner in a growing number of families – there’s more urgency than ever to make it easier for Americans to be good workers, good parents, and good caregivers, all at the same time.

The old model of work where you could expect to hold a steady job with good benefits for an entire career, is long gone. People in their 20s and 30s have come of age in an economy that’s totally different. And a lot of young parents are discovering just how tough that is on families. Many people now have wildly unpredictable schedules, or they cobble together part time work, or they’ve tried to go independent.

Flexibility can be good, but you shouldn’t have to worry that your family could lose your health care or retirement savings just because you change jobs or start a small business.

Why do you think every other–I have to ask–why do you think every other advanced country has paid family leave? Do you think they are just unrealistic, or do you think that they have figured out they can have a stabler economy, they can support families? And that’s what I want us to do. Working families need predictable scheduling, earned sick days and vacation days, quality affordable childcare and healthcare. These are not luxuries. They’re economic necessities.

In today’s economy, benefits should be flexible, portable, and comprehensive for everyone.

That means it’s time to expand Social Security as well. Especially, especially for older women who are widowed, or have taken time out of the workforce to care for a loved one, and who are suffering financially because of that. We need to look to a secure retirement for everyone, and to provide families relief from crushing costs and health care, housing, and prescription drugs. I looked at the numbers and in some states, two parents earning the minimum wage have to spend up to 35 percent of their income on childcare.

For a single parent, it could be 70 percent. So I will set a goal: families shouldn’t have to pay more than 10 percent of their income for childcare. And I will repeat today what I have said throughout this campaign: I will not raise taxes on the middle class I will give you tax relief to raise these burdens.

Now, you know whenever I talk about these family issues, Donald Trump says I’m playing the ‘woman’ card. Right? Well you know what I say, if fighting for childcare and paid leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in.

Here’s what I want you to understand. It may be difficult to imagine all this getting done and Washington is so broken, I get that – but I really think that progress is possible or I would not be standing up here running to be President of the United States.

I know Republicans and Democrats can work together, because I’ve done it. As you heard Alicia say, I helped create the Children’s Health Insurance Program when I was First Lady. That happened with support with both parties. And it now it covers 8 million kids and when you go to get health care for your child, nobody says, ‘Are you a Republican or Democrat?’ They say, ‘What does your child need?’

I worked with Republicans many times when I was a Senator from New York and as Secretary of State, so I know we can get results that will make real differences in people’s lives.

I know however it’s rare. There’s no question that we need to make Washington work much better than it does today. And that means in particular: getting unaccountable money out of our politics.

One of the reasons this election is so important is because the Supreme Court stands in the balance. We need to overturn that terrible Supreme Court decision, Citizens United, and then go a lot further to reform our whole campaign finance system.

This is about our democracy – but it’s also about our economy. Campaign finance reform and reducing the power of special interests is directly relevant to getting Washington working for the people again – making the right investments, putting your jobs and your economic security first.

That’s why I’m so passionate about this issue, and I’m will fight hard to end the stranglehold that the wealthy and special interests have on so much of our government.

So, let’s do this together. A historic investment in jobs. Debt-free college. Profit sharing. Making those at the top pay their fair share. Putting families first in our modern economy. And a democracy where working people’s voices are actually heard. That is what we are fighting for in this election.

As I said during the primary I am a progressive who likes to get things done and we can do this.

Just for a minute, compare what I am proposing to what we hear from Donald Trump. The self-proclaimed ‘King of Debt’ has no real ideas for making college more affordable or addressing the student debt crisis.  He has no credible plan for rebuilding our infrastructure, apart from his wall. He has no real strategy for creating jobs, just a string of empty promises. Maybe we shouldn’t expect better from someone whose most famous words are, ‘You’re fired.’

Well, here’s what I want you to know: I do have a jobs program. And as President, I’m going to make sure you hear, ‘You’re hired.’

Here’s the bottom line: Economists left, right, and center all agree Donald Trump will drive America back into recession. Just this week, one of Senator John McCain’s former economic advisors said Trump’s policies would wipe out, wipe out three-and-a-half million jobs. His tax cuts tilted toward the wealthy would add more than $30 trillion to our national debt over the next 20 years.

That is just astonishing and it’s no wonder that the Economist Intelligence Unit, one of the leading firms that analyzes the top threats to the global economy, now ranks a Trump Presidency #3, right behind problems in China and volatility in the commodities markets.

Look, I know Donald Trump hates it when anyone points out how hollow his sales pitch really is. I guess my speech yesterday must have gotten under his skin because right away he lashed out on Twitter with outlandish lies and conspiracy theories, and he did the same in his speech today.

Now think about it. He’s going after me personally because he has no answers on the substance. In fact, he doubled down on being the King of Debt.

So all he can do is try to distract us. That’s even why he’s attacking my faith, sigh. And of course attacking a philanthropic foundation that saves and improves lives around the world.

It’s no surprise he doesn’t understand these things. The Clinton Foundation helps poor people around the world get access to life-saving AIDS medicine.

Donald Trump uses poor people around the world to produce his line of suits and ties.  Here in North Carolina, you know as well as anyone that our economy is already too unpredictable for working families. We can’t let Donald Trump bankrupt America the way he bankrupted his casinos. We need to write a new chapter in the American Dream – and it can’t be Chapter 11.

Please, join me in this campaign, I’m offering a very different vision. We’re stronger together. We’re stronger when we grow together. We’re stronger when our economy works for everyone, not just those at the top. I am convinced that if we work hard if we go into November with the confidence and optimism that should be the American birthright, we will not only win an election, we will chart the course to the future that we want and deserve.

Thank you and God bless you.”

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It’s time to start a big, new conversation on this campaign, and what you have to say is pretty much indispensable.

A lot has happened since we started this campaign last April — we worked hard, had some good days (and maybe a few bad ones), and came together to win a primary and made history! To make sure we’re all headed into the general with our best foot forward, we wanted to dig in and ask: What went well for you? What could we have done better?

Take this quick 10-question survey. Your feedback will directly impact how we make decisions in the general.

We also don’t want the dialogue to stop there. Over the course of the week, we will be hosting a bunch of events online with different members of our staff — with all the new folks joining our team, we want to make sure everyone has a chance to talk about where we’ve been and where we’re going. We will keep you posted on those details so you can participate.

This campaign wouldn’t be the same without you. We’re lucky you’re here and for your continued support as we head into this next phase of this campaign. Please share your thoughts (and in the coming days, we’ll share ours):


Thank you,

Robby

Robby Mook
Campaign Manager
Hillary for America

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Donald Trump claims he is very smart.  Hillary Clinton is a genius. If you doubt that, just look at the date she close to deliver the first of several speeches on the economy: the morning after the compulsory FEC filings.  Here was the HuffPo header this morning:  Donald Trump’s Latest Campaign Finance Report Makes Dumpster Fires Look Good.

When a company or an individual starts a campaign, Internet is one of the most important tool to begin with. Because of that, this article are playing an important role in Internet branding strategies. If you want to make your brand visible among your targeted customers and have more traffic,sales and transactions, you need to upgrade your ranking by applying search engine optimization, social media marketing and search marketing campaigns.

After a few days off to welcome a new grandchild, Hillary was back to the podium with a blistering attack on Donald Trump’s business practices and economic ‘theory.’

Hillary started her speech recalling listening to what families have told her about how the economy affects them.  She reviewed some of the conditions on the ground in Ohio and also what she has done.

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She stated her Mission: To create good-paying jobs and referred the audience to her detailed agenda to jump-start the cycle of good-paying jobs increasing demand and thereby increasing job  opportunities.

Hillary Clinton Retweeted Hillary Clinton

“I’ll admit—it’s a little wonky, but…I sweat the specifics because they matter.”

She said she believes if you are running for POTUS you  say what you are going to do and how you are going to do it.

“If you’re running for president, you should say what you want to do, how you’re going to pay for it, and how you’ll get it done.” —Hillary

How families live, learn and work in this society will be addressed tomorrow in NC.  Today’s speech was about her opponent, and she moved on to Trump.

. and agree: Trump would put us into a deep recession.

. declared Donald Trump one of the 10 biggest threats to the global economy.

Donald Trump is proud of his recklessness—that’s his business. But when he’s running for president, it’s ours.

“Donald Trump actually stood on a debate stage in November and said that wages are too high in this country.” —Hillary

“He says women will start making equal pay as soon as they do as good a job as men—as if we aren’t already.” —Hillary on

“The full faith and credit of the United States is not something we can just gamble away.” —Hillary on Trump’s reckless economic plan

“President Trump” would undo so much of the progress we’ve made over the past 8 years under President Obama. We can’t let that happen.

“He’s giving more away to the 120,000 richest…families than he would to 120 million hardworking people.” —Hillary on Trump’s tax plan

“The last time we opted for Trump-style isolationism, it made the Great Depression longer and more painful.” —Hillary

Trump has written a lot of books about business—but they all seem to end at Chapter 11.

“The same people [Trump’s] trying to get to vote for him now are people he’s been exploiting for years” —Hillary:

., only someone who’s never actually faced the consequences of his mistakes would brag, “I play with bankruptcy.”

“Imagine him being in charge when your jobs and savings are at stake. Is this who you want leading us in an emergency?” —Hillary on Trump

In America, we don’t begrudge people being successful – but we know they shouldn’t do it by destroying other people.

We need to build an economy that ensures everyone gets an equal shot and no one is left behind. Join us:

Hillary Clinton in Ohio: Trump ‘Shouldn’t Have His Hands On Our Economy’

In a major speech in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton explained how Donald Trump would endanger the American and global economies as president, saying, “Just as he shouldn’t have his finger on the button, he shouldn’t have his hands on our economy.” Clinton laid out the broad consensus that Trump’s economic proposals, if enacted, could lead to another recession and cost the U.S. millions of jobs, specifically citing a new report by one of John McCain’s former economic advisers, Mark Zandi, which finds that a Trump presidency could lead to 3.5 million lost jobs. Pointing to Trump’s disastrous business record as an example of how he would damage the economy, Clinton said, “We can’t let him bankrupt America like we’re one of his failed casinos. We can’t let him roll the dice with our children’s futures.”

Clinton will deliver a second major speech on the economy on Wednesday in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she will lay out her vision for growing together and building an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top.

Below is a transcript of Clinton’s remarks in Columbus today:

“Thank you! Wow, thank you! Thank you! Thank you, thank you so much. Thank you all. Well thank you, it is wonderful to be back here in Columbus.

I want, I want to thank Whitney for not just her wonderful introduction but for all the hard work that she has done to build her career and the very strong endorsement she has given to Fort Hayes Career Center. Everyone associated with Fort Hayes, I want to thank you. This is exactly how we will create more good jobs with more opportunities for more people and it’s exciting to be here in a place that does just that.

I want to thank Governor Ted Strickland, who I hope is soon to be Senator Ted Strickland! Chairman David Pepper of the Ohio Democratic Party, Zach Klein, President of the Columbus City Council, John O’Grady, President of Franklin County Court of Commissioners, and all of you for being here with me.

I have to say I am pretty thrilled to be here for the first time speaking to any group like this as a grandmother of two now. It was an exciting weekend. Chelsea and Marc had a little boy and we are just truly over the moon. I have to confess, I’ve talked so much about being a grandmother, now I’m sure going to be talking doubly about being a grandmother. New stories to tell.

It’s always great to be back in Ohio, and I want to talk about a challenge that Ohio families know well – growing our economy and making it work for everyone, not just those at the top.

For more then a year now, I have been listening to Americans across our country. You’ve told me how the recession hit your communities – how jobs dried up, home values sank, and savings vanished. And I have seen how hard you’ve worked to get back on your feet.

If we’ve learned anything about the economy over the past 20 years, it’s that a President’s economic decisions have real consequences for families.  President Obama was handed the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. Thanks to his leadership – and the hard work and resilience of the American people – we have seen more than 14 million private sector jobs created over the last six and a half years. And here in Ohio, the auto industry has made a strong comeback.

And how appropriate as we are here in the area where students learn about autos, learn about how they are made and how they work.

Still, we know that people are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water.  And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high.  College is getting more expensive every day.  And wages are still too low and inequality is too great.  Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by.

Now these problems are serious – but I know we can overcome them together. I really believe in this country because I believe in the American people. America’s economy isn’t yet where we want it to be – but we are stronger and better positioned than anyone in the world to build the future you and your children deserve.

And I have spent my adult life working to even the odds for people who’ve had the odds stacked against them.  I helped break down barriers to education for poor and disabled children as a young lawyer; fought for health insurance for all, and have been committed to that since my days as First Lady; I worked to bring opportunity back to upstate New York as Senator; and went to bat for American workers and American businesses as your Secretary of State.

And everything I’ve learned, and everything I’ve done, has convinced me that we are stronger when we grow together.  And I’ve said, I’ve said throughout this campaign that my mission as President will be to help create more good-paying jobs, so we can get incomes rising for hard-working families across America.  It’s a pretty simple formula: higher wages lead to more demand, which leads to more jobs with higher wages. And I’ve laid out a detailed agenda to jumpstart this virtuous cycle.  And you can go to my web site, HillaryClinton.com, and read all about it.

And I do admit, I – it’s a little wonky, but I have this old-fashioned idea that if you’re running for President, you should say what you want to do, how you’re going to pay for it, and how you’ll get it done.

I actually sweat the specifics because they matter.  Whether one more kid gets health care may just be a detail in Washington – but it’s all that matters to that family worrying about their child.

Tomorrow in North Carolina, I will set out ambitious new goals that will help us build a stronger, fairer economy.  We’ll work with both parties to make transformational investments in good-paying jobs – in infrastructure, advanced manufacturing, clean energy and small business.  And we’ll tackle the twin problems of college affordability and student debt.  We’ll pursue innovative ideas like corporate profit-sharing, because everyone who works hard should be able to share in the rewards of their hard work. And to pay for these investments, we will make sure that Wall Street corporations, and the super-rich contribute their fair share.  And through it all, we’re going to make sure our policies match how families actually live, learn, and work in the 21st century.

So that’s what I’ll be talking about tomorrow in North Carolina and throughout this campaign.

But today, I want to talk about what Donald Trump is promising to do to the economy.  After more than a year, it’s important that he be held accountable for what he says he’ll do as President.  And we need to clear the way for a real conversation about how to improve the lives of working people.

A few weeks ago, I said his foreign policy proposals and reckless statements represent a danger to our national security.  But you might think that because he has spent his life as a businessman, he’d be better prepared to handle the economy. Well it turns out, he’s dangerous there, too.

Just like he shouldn’t have his finger on the button, he shouldn’t have his hands on our economy.

Now, I don’t say that because of typical political disagreements. Liberals and conservatives say Trump’s ideas would be disastrous.  The Chamber of Commerce and labor unions. Mitt Romney and Elizabeth Warren. Economists on the right and the left and the center all agree: Trump would throw us back into recession.

One of John McCain’s former economic advisers actually calculated what would happen to our country if Trump gets his way.  He described the results of a Trump Recession: we would lose three and a half million jobs, incomes would stagnate, debt would explode, and stock prices would plummet.  And you know who would be hit the hardest: the people who had the hardest time getting back on their feet after the 2008 crisis.

One of the leading firms that analyzes the top threats to the global economy – called the Economist Intelligence Unit – comes out with a new list of threats every month.  It includes things like terrorism and the disintegration of Europe.  And this month, number three on the list is Donald Trump becoming President of the United States. Just think about that.

Every day, we see how reckless and careless Trump is. He’s proud of it. Well – that’s his choice.   Except when he’s asking to be our President. Then it’s our choice.

Donald Trump actually stood on a debate stage in November and said that wages are too high in this country.  He should tell that to the mothers and fathers working two jobs to raise their kids.

He said – and I quote – ‘Having a low minimum wage is not a bad thing for this country’ – at a time when millions working full-time are still living in poverty.

Back in 2006, before the financial crash, Trump said, and again, I quote, ‘I sort of hope’ that the housing market crashes, because he’d make money off all of the foreclosures.

Over the years, he said all kinds of things about women in the workforce.  He once called pregnant employees – and I quote – ‘an inconvenience.’  He says women will start making equal pay as soon as we do as good a job as men – as if weren’t already.  Now these are the words not of someone who thinks highly of women who work, or who cares about helping parents balance work and family. But instead he literally doesn’t know how much of how we have grown the economy over the last 40 years which is largely thanks to women getting into the workforce and adding to family income like asphalt paving lakeland fl who do professional construction work.

And he wants to end Obamacare, but has no credible plan to replace it or to help keep costs down.  It really wouldn’t be good for our economy, would it, if 20 million people lost their health insurance and we were back to absolutely skyrocketing costs for everything. It would be devastating to families and it would also be bad for the economy.

Here’s exactly what he’s promising to do as President, and why I believe it’s wrong for America.

First, there’s his plan for Wall Street.

After the 2008 crisis, President Obama fought to enact the toughest, most comprehensive set of Wall Street reforms since the Great Depression.  They’re designed to protect consumers and ensure that Wall Street can never again take the kinds of risks that crashed our economy the last time.

So what would Trump do?  He said he wants to wipe out the tough rules we put on big banks.  He said they created – quote – ‘a very bad situation.’ Well he’s got it backwards.  The ‘very bad situation’ was millions of families seeing their homes and savings disappear.

He also wants to repeal the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the new consumer watchdog that Senator Warren helped create to protect families from unfair and deceptive business practices.  That new agency has already secured billions of dollars in returns for people who’ve been ripped off.  Donald Trump wants to get rid of it.

Trump would take us back to where we were before the crisis.  He’d rig the economy for Wall Street again.

Well that will not happen on my watch, I can guarantee you.  I would veto any effort to weaken those reforms.  I would defend them and strengthen them – both for the big banks and the shadow banking system. And I will vigorously enforce the law.  Because we can’t ever let Wall Street wreck Main Street again.

Now second, there’s Donald Trump’s approach to our national debt.

Now, I have a plan to pay for all my proposals, because I take America’s long-term financial health seriously.

Donald Trump has a different approach.  He calls himself the King of Debt.  And his tax plan sure lives up to that name.  According to the independent Tax Policy Center, it would increase the national debt by more than $30 trillion over 20 years.  That’s ‘trillion’ with a ‘t.’  It’s much, much more than any nominee of either party has ever proposed.  An economist described it with words ‘not even in the universe of the realistic.’

And how would he pay for all this debt?  He said, and I quote, ‘I would borrow, knowing if the economy crashed, you could make a deal.  It’s like, you know, you make a deal before you go into a poker game.’

Well actually, it’s not like that at all.

The full faith and credit of the United States is not something we just gamble away.  That could cause an economic catastrophe.   And it would break 225 years of ironclad trust if the American economy has with Americans and the rest of the world.  Alexander Hamilton would be rolling in his grave.  You see, we pay our debts – that’s why investors come here even when everything else in the world goes wrong.

You don’t have to take it from me.  Ronald Reagan said it, ‘We have a well-earned reputation for reliability and credibility – two things that set us apart from much of the world.’

Now maybe Donald feels differently because he made a fortune filing bankruptcies and stiffing his creditors.  I’ll get to his business practices in a minute, but the United States of America doesn’t do business Trump’s way.

And it matters, it matters when a presidential candidate talks like this, because the world hangs on every word our President says.  The markets rise and fall on those statements.  Even suggesting that the United States would default would cause a global panic.

Trump also says, we can just print more money to pay our debt down.  Well we know what happened to countries that tried that in the past like Germany in the ‘20s and Zimbabwe in the ‘90s.  It drove inflation through the roof and crippled their economies.  The American dollar is the safest currency on the planet.  Why would he want to mess with that? And so we have to stand up for our history. Democrats and Republicans have always understood this. We can’t let these loose, careless remarks get any credence in our electorate or around the world.

And finally, the Trump campaign said that, if worst came to worst, we could just sell off America’s assets.  Really?  Even if we sold all our aircraft carriers and the Statue of Liberty – even if we let some billionaire turn Yosemite into a private country club – we still wouldn’t even get close.  That’s how much debt he’d run up.

Maybe this is what he means when he says ‘I love playing with debt.’  Someone should tell him our nation’s economy isn’t a game.  The full faith and credit of the United States is sacred.

We know what sound fiscal policy looks like and it sure isn’t running up massive debts to pay for giveaways to the rich. And it is not painful austerity that hurts working families and undercuts our long-term progress. It’s being strong, stable, and making smart investments in our future. So let’s set the right priorities and pay for them, so we can hand our children a healthier economy and a better future.

Now third, there’s Donald Trump’s tax plan.

You know when I was working on this speech, I had the same experience I had when I was working on the speech I gave about foreign policy and national security. I’d have my researchers and my speechwriters send me information. And then I would say really? He really said that? And they would send me all the background and the video clip, so here goes.

He’d give millionaires a $3 trillion tax cut. Corporations would get two trillion more dollars. That means he’s giving more away to the 120,000 richest American families than he would to help 120 million hardworking Americans. Now even in this era of rising inequality, this is like nothing we’ve ever seen.

Now you and I know that the wealthiest Americans and the biggest corporations don’t need trillions of dollars in tax cuts. They need to be paying their fair share.

And now, before releasing his plan, Trump said, ‘Hedge fund guys are getting away with murder.’ And he added, ‘They’ll pay more.’

Then his plan came out.  And it actually makes the current loophole even worse.  It’s gives hedge-fund managers a special tax rate that’s lower than what many middle-class families pay. And I did have to look twice because I didn’t believe it.  Under Donald Trump’s plan, these Wall Street millionaires will pay a lower tax rate than many working people.

And of course, Donald himself would get a huge tax cut from his own plan.  But we don’t know exactly how much because he won’t release his tax returns.

Now, every major presidential candidate in the last four decades has shown the American people their taxes.  In fact, Donald actually told Mitt Romney to do it.  And he said that if he ever ran for President, he would release his returns.  My husband and I have released ours going back nearly 40 years.

And now Donald’s refusing.  You have to ask yourself, what’s he afraid of?  Maybe we will learn he hasn’t paid taxes on his huge income?  We know that happened for at least a few years – he paid nothing, or close to it.  Or maybe he isn’t as rich as he claims. Or that he hasn’t given away as much to charity as he brags about.

Whatever the reason, Americans deserve to know before you cast your votes this November.

And when it comes to other people’s taxes, Donald Trump’s got it all wrong. We need to do better by the middle class, not by the rich. And that’s why my plan will help working families with the costs of college, healthcare and childcare – the things that really stretch a family’s budget. That’s where our focus should be.

Now fourth, Donald Trump’s ideas about the economy and the world will cause millions of Americans to lose their jobs.

The Republican primary featured the Trump immigration plan: round up and deport more than 11 million people – almost all of whom are employed or are children going to school – then build a wall across our border and force Mexico to pay for it.

Now this policy is not only wrong headed and unachievable, it is really bad economics.  Kicking out 11 million immigrants would cost hundreds of billions of dollars, and it would shrink our economy significantly.  Some economists actually argue that just this policy alone would send us into a Trump Recession.

So instead of causing large-scale misery and shrinking our economy, we should pass sensible immigration reform with a path to citizenship.  Because the youth, the youth and diversity of our workforce is one of our greatest assets.  Most of the rest of the world that we compete with is aging, so by staying younger and fresher, with talents that can be put to work, we’re actually going to be in a stronger economic position in the next decades. We’ve always been a country where people born elsewhere could work hard, start businesses and contribute to our growth.  That makes us stronger and more prosperous.

And then there’s trade.  I believe we can compete and win in the global economy.  To do that, we should renegotiate deals that aren’t working for Americans, and reject any agreements – like the Trans-Pacific Partnership – that don’t meet my high bar for raising wages or creating good-paying jobs.  And I will be tough on trade enforcement, too. Because when China dumps cheap steel in our markets or unfairly manipulates its currency, we need to respond forcefully.

And at the same time, we need to invest more at home.  I have a ‘Make it in America’ plan to increase 21st century manufacturing and energy jobs in America.  We’re going to build on the great ideas of Senator Sherrod Brown, and invest $10 billion in manufacturing communities. I agree with Sherrod with the right investments and a level playing field, American workers will out-hustle and out-innovate anyone in the world.

Now Donald Trump makes big threats, but he has no serious plan to encourage manufacturing, innovation or job creation in America.

And there’s a difference between getting tough on trade, and recklessly starting trade wars. The last time we opted for Trump-style isolationism, it made the Great Depression longer and more painful.

Interestingly, Trump’s own products are made in a lot of countries that aren’t named America.  Trump ties are made in China; Trump suits, in Mexico; Trump furniture, in Turkey; Trump picture frames in India; and Trump barware in Slovenia.  And I could go on and on, but you get the idea.

And I’d love him to explain how all that fits with his talk about America First.

I honestly believe that the difference between us is not just about policy.  We have fundamentally different views of whether America is strong or weak.  See I believe in the ingenuity and productivity of our workers.  I know we can sell our products to the 95 percent of global consumers who live outside of our country.  On the other hand, Donald Trump never misses a chance to say that Americans, he’s talking about us, to say that Americans are losers and the rest of the world is laughing at us.  Just the other day, he told a crowd that America is – quote – ‘not going to survive.’ I do not know what he is talking about. I went to 112 countries as your Secretary of state and what I say is envy, envy for our strength, our values, our diversity, the future we are making together – and I just can’t imagine how someone running for President of the United States could ever think that that is true.

I do understand how frustrated, fearful, and even angry many people are, especially if you’re underemployed or making a lot less than you used to, or worried that your kids or your grandkids won’t have the kind of good, solid middle class life that you did.  And we haven’t done enough to invest in our communities and in our people, to make sure there are enough good jobs with rising incomes to create that good future for all of us.

The answer is to do that – to bring them along on America’s ride to a prosperity that we all can share.  Not try to turn the clock back, pretend we can’t compete and decrease the jobs of the future.

But those are his plans for the economy.

Now, you may have noticed – there’s a lot missing.

The King of Debt has no real plan for making college debt payable back or making college debt free, this is a crisis that affects so many of our people.

He has no credible plan for rebuilding our infrastructure, apart from the wall that he wants to build.  Personally I’d rather spend our money on rebuilding our schools or modernizing our energy grid.

He has no ideas how to strengthen Medicare or expand Social Security – in fact, his tax plan would endanger both.

He has no real strategy for creating jobs, just a string of empty promises.  But then maybe we shouldn’t expect better from someone whose most famous words are, ‘You’re fired.’

He has no clean energy plan, even though that’s where many of the jobs of the future will come from and it is the key to a safer, healthier planet.  He just says that climate change is a hoax invented by the Chinese.  Well I’ll give him this – it is a lot easier to say a problem doesn’t exist than it is to actually try to solve it.

And of course he has no plan for helping urban and rural communities facing entrenched poverty and neglect.

Every single one of these issues matter.  They affect whether young people can go to college, whether single moms can support their kids, whether grandparents can have a dignified retirement.  What could be more important?

In the heat of a campaign, in a culture that rewards brevity and clever phrases on social media, it is tempting to give simple answers to complex problems.  Believe me, I have been tempted. But I’m not going to do that because it really matters that you know what I believe we can and should do so you can hold me accountable, in the election and then in the White House. Because whether we increase employment in distressed rural communities, relieve the burden of college debt or get health care to the people who still don’t have it – that all matters. And to me that’s the purpose of politics, to empower people in a democracy to have better lives, to make better choices, to seize opportunities to give themselves and their families that pathway to the future.

And one more thing.

I think Donald Trump has said he’s qualified to be President because of his business record.  A few days ago, he said, and I quote, ‘I’m going to do for the country what I did for my business.’  So let’s take a look at what he did for his business.

He’s written a lot of books about business – they all seem to end at Chapter 11.  Go figure.

And over the years, he intentionally ran up huge amounts of debt on his companies and then he defaulted.  He bankrupted his companies – not once, not twice, but four times.  Hundreds of people lost their jobs.  Shareholders were wiped out.   Contractors – many of them small businesses – took heavy losses.  Many went bust.  But Donald Trump, he came out fine.

Here’s what he said about one of those bankruptcies: ‘I figured it was the bank’s problem, not mine.  What the hell did I care?’

He also says, ‘I play’ with bankruptcy.  Everything seems to be a game with him.  Well, it isn’t for a lot of us, is it?

Just look at what he did in Atlantic City.  He put his name on buildings – his favorite thing to do.  He convinced other people that his properties were a great investment, so they would go in with him.

But he arranged it so he got paid no matter how his companies performed.  So when his casino and hotel went bankrupt because of how badly he mismanaged them, he still walked away with millions while everybody else paid the price.  Well today, his properties are sold, shuttered or falling apart.

And so are a lot of people’s lives.  Here’s what he says about that: ‘Atlantic City was a very good cash cow for me for a long time.’

Remember that the next time you see him talking on TV, about how we’ll all win big, if only we elect him President.

Now he’s trying to say he’s changed, somebody’s told him he needs to say that. That he’s not in it for himself anymore – he’s really now in it for America. But he’s doing the exact same thing that he’s been doing for years.  This is his one move.  He makes over-the-top promises that if people stick with him, trust him, listen to him, put their faith in him – he’ll deliver for them.  He’ll make them wildly successful.  And then everything falls apart, and people get hurt.

Those promises you’re hearing from him at his campaign rallies?  They’re the same promises he made to his customers at Trump University.  And now they’re suing him for fraud.

The same people he’s trying to get to vote for him now are people he’s been exploiting for years.  Because it’s not just other investors other rich people that he took advantage of – it was working people.

He’s been involved in more than 3,500 lawsuits in the past 30 years. And a large number were filed by ordinary Americans and small businesses that did work for Trump and never got paid – painters, waiters, plumbers – people who needed the money, and didn’t get it – not because he couldn’t pay them, but because he could stiff them.  Sometimes he offered them 30 cents on the dollar for projects they had already completed.  Hundreds of liens have been filed against him by contractors, going back decades.  And they all tell a similar story:  I worked for him, I did my job, he wouldn’t pay me what he owed me.

My late father was a small businessman.  If his customers had done what Trump did, my dad would never have made it.  So, I take this personally.

He says he’s a businessman, and this is what businessmen do. Well, CNN pointed out that no major company has filed Chapter 11 more often in the last 30 years than Trump’s casinos.  So no, this is not normal behavior.  There are great business people here in Ohio, in America – brilliant, hardworking men and women who care about their workers and the people they do business with, and they want to build something that lasts.  They’re decent.  They’re honest.  They’re patriots.  Some might even make fine presidents.  And they would never dream of acting the way Donald Trump does.

In America, we don’t begrudge people being successful – but we know they shouldn’t do it by destroying other people’s dreams. And so, if I were not running against him for president, I would be saying exactly the same thing.

We cannot put a person like this, with all his empty promises, in a position of power over our lives.

We can’t let him bankrupt America like we are one of his failed casinos.  We can’t let him roll the dice with our children’s futures.

Leading an economy as large and complex as ours, creating growth that is strong, fair and lasting is about as hard a job as there is.  It takes patience and clear thinking, a willingness to work across party lines, to level with the American people and it takes really caring about whether working families will be better off because of what we do.

Think of FDR leading us out of the Great Depression.  Imagine all the work that required – all the learning and patience, all the hard calls, day after day, for years.  But he steered us right.  And we emerged stronger and better positioned to build the greatest middle class in history and lead the world toward peace and prosperity.

Or think of President Obama in 2009 – newly elected, confronting the greatest economic crisis of our lifetimes. He had nothing to do with creating it. It landed in his lap, and he had to be focused, and he had to return to basics, to get us moving again. He fought for the Recovery Act to get people working, he passed Wall Street reforms and relief for homeowners, and he saved the auto industry.  And today, we are on a surer footing, ready to seize tomorrow.

Now just imagine if you can, Donald Trump sitting in the Oval Office the next time America faces a crisis. Imagine him being in charge when your jobs and savings are at stake.  Is this who you want to lead us in an emergency?  Someone thin-skinned and quick to anger, who’d likely be on Twitter attacking reporters or bringing the whole regulatory system down on his critics, when he should be focused on fixing what’s wrong?

Would he even know what to do?

Now, I have a lot of faith that the American people will make the right decision.  Making Donald Trump our President would undo much of the progress we’ve made, and put our economy at risk.

And beyond that – this election will say something about who we are as a people.  Donald Trump believes in the worst of us. He thinks we’re fearful, not confident. That we favor division, not unity; walls, not bridges; and yesterday, not tomorrow.  He thinks the only way forward is to go back to a past prosperity that left a lot of people out.

In fact, the only way forward is forward – toward a 21st-century version of the American dream, with a modern economy and a shared prosperity where no one’s left out or left behind.

I believe in an America always moving toward the future.  So, if you believe, as I do, in an America that values hard work, treats people with dignity, offers everyone the chance to live their dreams, cares for those in need, well the formula for America’s success has always been that we’re stronger together. And we need to remember that now, and recommit ourselves to making that ideal real in our time.

That’s how we will build an economy to make sure that it does work for everyone and to make our families and our communities stronger. We’ll make sure, in our country, no one gets left behind.

So let’s carry that message all across America.  Let’s fight hard lets win in November.  And then let’s get to work my friends, let’s make America what we know it can be. Thank you all very much.”

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This is a month old, but ICYMI:

Here’s the RNC statement. In his long career, only thousands of jobs? Shouldn’t that number be higher?

“Hillary Clinton is the last person qualified to talk about what will get our economy thriving again. After eight years of disastrous Obama policies which have produced stagnant wages, historically weak growth, and a declining middle class, Hillary Clinton is doubling down on the same failed agenda which has left our country wondering when prosperity will come back. Struggling Americans can’t afford the more than $1.3 trillion in new spending that she is proposing, and with Clinton saying President Obama deserves an ‘A’ for his handling of the economy, it’s clear American families will only continue to lose ground if she is elected. Donald Trump is a successful businessman who has spent his career creating thousands of jobs. The closest Hillary Clinton has come to business success was putting her office at the State Department up for sale to foreign donors and special interests.”

This is almost two years old, so the number is higher now.

Bragging Rights

07.07.14

Why You Don’t Know Obama Has Created 4.5 Million Jobs

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