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At a campaign event in Toledo, Ohio today, Hillary delivered a speech addressing broad economic plans contrasting her proposed policies to those of Donald Trump.  Look for Hillary around the 35 minute mark.

In Toledo, Clinton Lays Out Tools for Fighting Corporate Fraud and Abuse, Vows to Create An Economy That Works For Everyone

At a speech in Toledo on Monday, Hillary Clinton outlined her vision for corporate America as a partner in an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. She proposed policy solutions that would promote an economy where our businesses, workers and consumers grow and prosper together. That would be a stark contrast to the approach of Donald Trump, Clinton said, who has taken corporate abuse and excess and made a business model out of it – and who may have avoided paying taxes for nearly two decades, while tens of millions of working families paid theirs. Clinton added, “While millions of American families, including mine and yours, were working hard paying our fair share, it seems he was contributing nothing to our nation. Imagine that. Not fair. Nothing for Pell Grants to help kids go to college. Nothing for veterans. Nothing for our military. And you know, he has been dissing America in this whole campaign. Right? He talks us down. He makes disparaging comments about our country. He calls our military a disaster. Well, it’s not, but it might have been if everybody else had failed to pay taxes to support our brave men and women in uniform.”

As part of her longstanding commitment to promote free and fair competition, Clinton laid out two new policy proposals: curbing the prevalence of fine-print “forced arbitration” clauses in contracts that prevent workers and consumers like Wells Fargo customers from bringing legal action against companies who have harmed them, and a new commitment to promote competition, address excessive market concentration and reinvigorate antitrust laws and enforcement.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello, Toledo. I am – I am very happy to be here today and – I am so grateful to have this chance to talk to you about what we can do together to have the kind of economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top.

I want to acknowledge – we have an overflow crowd in another room, and I know they can hear us, but we’re glad they’re here. I want to thank your Congresswoman, Marcy Kaptur, for her leadership and her grit. I want to thank Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson. And the mayor told me there’s a young man here who just won a boxing championship, Robert Easter. Where’s Robert Easter? There you are, Robert Easter. Congratulations. I know Toledo is proud of you; we all are. I want to thank Kenyetta for that introduction. Do we have any other UAW members here?

It’s a great day to be here in Ohio for a lot of different reasons. One is I am so thrilled that LeBron James has endorsed me and joined our campaign. I know – I’ve gotten a lot of wonderful endorsements over the past year and a half. I’m grateful for each and every one of them. But I got to say, there’s something special about this one. And it’s a real honor in part because of why he chose to endorse me. Now, not everyone knows this. I mean, you all know what an amazing athlete he his – MVP, winner of championships – but he’s also – LeBron is also a dedicated advocate for children. And this afternoon I’ll be in Akron, where he’s done so much for the kids in that community.

It’s a deep, personal commitment that he has that I share with him. We both believe every single child should have the chance to live up to his or her God-given potential. I could not be prouder to have LeBron joining our team as we head into the homestretch.

Now, one thing I know – I’ll just say it because I know it’s for sure – I hope to be elected president, but I know here in Ohio LeBron will always be the King.

I was listening to Kenyetta introduce me, and I really appreciated what she said, because Toledo is the kind of place where people work hard, look after one another, and yes, pay their taxes, right?

You recognize that we all have to do our part because we are all in this together, and it matters.

We believe honest work deserves honest pay. We believe everyone should have the right to join a strong union that will always have your back.

It’s personal for me. I’m the granddaughter of a factory worker from Scranton, Pennsylvania. He went to work in the same lace mill every day for 50 years. He believed he passed it down to my dad, who passed it down to me that if he did what he was supposed to do, he’d have a good life and his kids would have an even better life. That is the American dream. That is what we believe in. That’s what we’ve got to keep going generation after generation.

And because of my grandfather’s hard work, my dad made it to college. And then after serving in the Navy during World War II, he started his own small business, printing fabric for draperies.

As a young girl, I’d sometimes go to his print plant. It was a long building, no natural light, no windows, but he had these long tables where he’d roll out the fabric and then I’d watch him work with silkscreens, if you’ve ever seen that. He would take the silkscreen, he’d put it down, he’d pour the paint in, he’d take the squeegee, go across all the way down to the end of one table, then over to the next table, all the way back. And then if there was a second color to be added, he would do that. He sometimes let me help with the squeegee. That was my favorite part.

And I know he worked really hard. He worked really hard. He believed in hard work. He passed that on to me. He provided a good middle-class life for us. So I am proud to stand with hardworking families all over Toledo, Ohio, and America, who should have the same chance that I did to share in the American Dream, which should be big enough for everybody.

Fighting for kids and families has been the cause of my life, as Kenyetta said, when I went to work for the Children’s Defense Fund all those years ago. And it will be the mission of my presidency, because I want to focus on what are called kitchen table issues, the ones that keep you up at night – like the cost of child care, and college, and prescription drugs, and so much else.

And that means we’ve got to create more good jobs with rising incomes. That means we’ve got to have good schools in every zip code. That means everybody willing to work – and I say that very clearly; you’ve got to be willing to work – and if you’re willing to work, you should be able to get ahead and stay ahead. That is the basic bargain.

Now, I don’t know about you, but you wouldn’t think that the theme of my campaign, ‘getting an economy to work for everyone, not just those at the top’ would be controversial – and yet this is one of the defining debates not just of this election but of our time.

Now, I will say, most American companies – most – are run by honorable, patriotic people who care about their employees and communities. But there are still too many powerful interests fighting to protect their own profits and privileges at the expense of everyone else. [Applause.] And they are aided and abetted by the rules and incentives in our economy who actually encourage people at the top to take advantage of consumers, workers, small businesses, and taxpayers.

That makes it tougher for the well-meaning CEOs to take the high road. And it gets even harder when we don’t aggressively enforce the rules, when we don’t enforce trade rules that allow other countries with lower wages and standards to get an unfair leg up, when we don’t enforce rules on Wall Street, which exerts enormous pressure on publicly traded companies to prioritize boosting share prices in the short term over building real value, investing in workers, plant, and equipment over the longer term.

And let’s be honest, the tax code rewards corporations for outsourcing jobs and their profits overseas instead of investing here in the United States. And it is riddled with loopholes that let the rich get even richer and make income inequality even worse. It tilts the playing field further against small businesses that can’t afford lawyers and lobbyists.

So with all these pressures pushing in the wrong direction, it’s even more important that we have an election about these very issues. Because what I know will happen – if we have an election where we have an agenda that actually would begin to level that playing field, we will rebuild the middle class, we will make work pay, we will create greater opportunities for a great percentage of Americans.

Now, I know how hard this, but I think we are on the cusp, if we win this election, to be able to get these things done, right?”

AUDIENCE: “Yeah.”

HILLARY CLINTON: “That means pursuing reforms that unleash the enormous positive potential of the American private sector. We’ve got unmatched talent, innovation, entrepreneurial spirit.

So when we work together, we can all benefit.

Now, I believe corporations that benefit from everything America has to offer should feel some sense of responsibility not just to their biggest shareholders – but to their workers, to their customers, to their communities, and yes, to our country, to the United States of America. We have been moving off track for decades. I don’t need to tell you that. You know it, you’ve lived it, you’ve seen it. But it is time to get back on track.

And you can ask anybody who’s ever worked for me or worked with me, who’s ever served with me, when I tell you I’m going to try to do something, I will get up every single day and work my heart out for you.

So let’s begin by making it clear that for most businesses, America is the most important asset on their balance sheet. This country of ours, this system of ours, the rule of law, the opportunity to get an education and go as far as your hard work and ambition will take you. And we created the biggest engine of economic growth in the world, the American middle class. So when we middle class thrives, the country thrives. And when it doesn’t, we don’t, right?

And I’m going to use the White House and every tool at my disposal as your president to make the case that patriotism is profitable. Standing up for America, investing in America will pay off.

Now, we have always had innovators and entrepreneurs who build great companies and create real value. But we should not and we will not respect those who get rich by cheating everybody else.

So today I want to send a clear message to every boardroom, every executive suite across America: If you scam your customers, exploit your employees, pollute our environment, or rip off taxpayers, we will find ways to hold you accountable.

But on the other side – on the other side, if you do the right thing and you invest in your workers and your communities and our country’s future, we will stand with you. That is the choice. Our goal is to make it easier for everyone to do better.

Now, to understand why this is so important, consider the recent examples we’ve seen of egregious corporate behavior.

Look at Wells Fargo. Really shocking, isn’t it? One of the nation’s biggest banks bullying thousands of employees into committing fraud against unsuspecting customers, secretly opening up millions of accounts for people without their consent, even their knowledge, misusing personal information, and then sticking customers with hidden fees. It is outrageous that eight years after a cowboy culture on Wall Street wrecked our economy, we are still seeing powerful bankers playing fast and loose with the law.

And then in a category by himself, there’s Donald Trump. Well, you may have heard that he has long refused to release his tax returns the way every other nominee for president has done for decades. You can look at 40 years of my tax returns. I think we need a law that says if you become the nominee of the major parties, you have to release your tax returns.

Now, a lot of us were wondering, what is he hiding? It must be really terrible. Well, The New York Times has discovered at least part of the answer. Back in the 1990s, Trump apparently lost a billion dollars in a single year on bad investments and failing casinos. Now, how anybody can lose a dollar, let alone a billion dollars, in the casino industry is kind of beyond me. It’s just hard to figure. But as a result, it doesn’t look like he paid a dime of federal income tax for almost two decades.

Now, while millions of American families, including mine and yours, were working hard paying our fair share, it seems he was contributing nothing to our nation. Imagine that. Not fair. Nothing for Pell Grants to help kids go to college. Nothing for veterans. Nothing for our military. And you know, he has been dissing America in this whole campaign. Right? He talks us down. He makes disparaging comments about our country. He calls our military a disaster. Well, it’s not, but it might have been if everybody else had failed to pay taxes to support our brave men and women in uniform.

I saw a newspaper article. A gentleman named Steve Crouse, who owns the Glass City Café here in Toledo, summed it up pretty well in this article. He said, ‘I would feel guilty if I didn’t pay anything. It’s flat-out cheating the government.’ Now, my friend Bernie Sanders was right yesterday when he said Trump reflects a distorted view of the American people and what this country is all about.

Trump represents the same rigged system that he claims he’s going to change. The whole story tells us everything we need to know about how Trump does business. After he made all those bad bets and lost all that money, he didn’t lift a finger to help and protect his employees, or all the small businesses and contractors he’d hired, or the people of Atlantic City. They all got hammered while he was busy with his accountants trying to figure out how he could keep living like a billionaire. And all the while he was using his political connections to collect hundreds of millions of dollars in government subsidies and extra tax breaks for his companies. In other words, Trump was taking from America with both hands and leaving the rest of us with the bill.

Now, he says that he’s the one who can fix things, but that is like letting the fox guard the henhouse. Right? And here’s what I really am just stunned by. I get stunned every day in this campaign. But here’s one of the many things that I’m stunned by. He has put forth a tax plan that would cut his own taxes even more. It would be like you’re paying zero. You expect us to pay you to stay in business, all the rest of us in America? He’d open the loopholes even wider. And according to a new independent study, he would actually – listen to this, people, because this is a real shocker – his plan would actually raise taxes for millions of middle class families. And you know the people it would hit the hardest? Are single parents, whose lives and challenges he doesn’t care about, certainly doesn’t understand.

Now, many have likely already spent years paying more than he did, and he now would make that even worse. And what does he say about it? Well, did you all see the debate last Monday? Well, in the debate – in the debate – well, then you all know that in the debate he said it was smart to avoid paying taxes. Yesterday his campaign was bragging it makes him a genius. Here’s my question: What kind of genius loses a billion dollars in a single year?

This is Trump to a T. He’s taken corporate excess and makes a business model out of it. He abuses his power, games the system, puts his own interests ahead of the country’s. It’s Trump first and everyone else last. And there are lots of principled, law-abiding business leaders out there who are horrified by all of this. Not a single – not a single CEO of a Fortune 100 company supports Trump’s campaign. Think about it. I’ve been endorsed by very successful people – Warren Buffett, Mike Bloomberg, Mark Cuban. I loved what Mark Cuban said when he endorsed me. He said, ‘Look, I’ve been successful.’ He actually is a real billionaire. And you know what? He used profit-sharing to help his employees, not bankruptcy to fire people. And when he sold his first company, he shared the profits with his employees, and 300 of them became millionaires. That’s the kind of business practices I want to see more of in our country.

But here’s what we’ve got to do. Even if Trump is like one of a kind, we’ve got to reverse the broader trends he represents. It’s time to rewrite the rules and make this economy fair for everyone. And today I want to briefly share with you my plan for protecting taxpayers, consumers, small businesses, and workers. We’re going to crack down on the worst corporate abuses and empower companies willing to take the high road and invest in good jobs, in higher wages, and in stronger communities.

First let’s start with protecting taxpayers and making sure we have more fairness in the system. It is wrong that corporations and the super-wealthy play by a different set of rules. A Wall Street money manager should not be able to pay a lower tax rate than a teacher or a nurse. And I’ll tell you something else. Our largest companies should not be able to get away with paying hardly anything at all. It is insulting when they engage in these games, like moving their headquarters over to a foreign country – on paper, not in reality – just to take advantage of lower tax rates. And it is infuriating when they take tax breaks with one hand and give out pink slips in America with the other hand.

So here’s what we’re going to do. We’re going to close those loopholes. I’ve got a list of them we’re going after. We’re going to make Wall Street corporations and the super-rich start paying their fair share of taxes. We’re going to pass something called the Buffett rule, which means multimillionaires cannot lower rates than their secretaries and other people working for them. We’re going to put in place a new exit tax. If companies try to leave our country to avoid paying their fair share, if they try to outsource jobs, they’re going to have to give back every tax break they ever received in our country. And then we’re going to put that money to work creating opportunities here in America.

Second, we’re going to protect consumers. No American should ever be taken advantage of, like thousands were, by Wells Fargo. And this isn’t a new fight for me. As a Senator, I raised the alarm about subprime mortgages. I fought to hold reckless managers accountable for toxic toys and household products that threaten our kids. I introduced legislation to protect Americans’ personal data and combat identity theft. So as president, I will make consumer protection a top priority across the entire government.

And that starts by defending and empowering the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was created after the financial crisis. And the principal person who got it created was Senator Elizabeth Warren. And under the leadership of Ohio’s Rich Cordray, the agency has already returned more than $11 billion to more than 15 million Americans who were ripped off by predatory lenders, credit card companies, and others. And it is the one making sure that the defrauded Wells Fargo customers get their money back.

Now, I got to say I am so proud of what this new agency has done. Sometimes people say, well, what does the government really do? Well, there’s a lot of examples, but this is a primary one, standing up and making sure consumers get paid back when they are ripped off. And because of its success, Republicans in Congress keep trying to shut it down. And Donald Trump agrees with them. In fact, he wants to scrap all the tough new rules imposed on Wall Street after the crisis. Well, not on my watch, Donald. We’re never going to let that happen.

Now, instead of gutting consumer protection, we should be expanding it. And we should build on the Dodd-Frank financial reforms and go even further because Wall Street can never, ever be permitted to threaten Main Street again. And the Wells Fargo scandal sheds light on another threat to consumers that we have to address. When the scam’s victims, people like you and me, who had accounts there tried to sue, they were shocked to learn there was a provision in the very fine print of their contracts that kept them from going to court to sue the bank for being cheated. Instead, they are forced into a closed-door arbitration process without the important protections that you get in a court of law. We are not going to let corporations like Wells Fargo use these fine print “gotchas” to escape accountability.

And in fact, this is now common practice across a lot of industries – from nursing homes, nursing homes that mistreat seniors, to for-profit colleges that defraud students. Who reads all that fine print? I don’t. And you get defrauded or you get mistreated, and then all of a sudden they say, ‘Well, you can’t sue us.’ So we’re going to rein in that abuse across everybody.

We also see a similar problem in some international trade agreements, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership. It sets up a dispute resolution system that favors large corporations over everyone else. It’s one of the reasons I’m against it. I’ve warned about this for years, I’ve written about it, and I oppose TPP now, I will oppose it after the election, I will oppose it as president – because it is one-sided and unfair to American workers.

And what about all those pharmaceutical companies that jack up prices for no reason? We’re going to have to protect ourselves against that too. And when we find unjustified spikes in the prices of longstanding, life-saving drugs, we should slap penalties on companies trying to cheat people who need those drugs.

And let’s finally import safe alternatives from other countries, like Canada, and speed up approvals to get more generic drugs on the market. And it is long past time to allow Medicare to negotiate for better prices for drugs and get the cost down for Medicare recipients. And I believe we should cap the amount working families pay out of pocket every month for medicine. No one should ever have to choose between paying the rent and filling their prescriptions.

So let’s stand up for taxpayers. Let’s stand up for consumers. And let’s stand up for small businesses, which create most of the jobs in America. I take this personally because of my dad’s very small business. We need fair rules of the road so big corporations can’t use their power to gain unfair advantages.

Now, when it comes to bullying small businesses, Donald Trump is the poster boy. I have heard so many stories of contractors, and I’ve met some too, who worked for him, produced the goods and services, and never got paid for what they were owed. I’m talking about painters, and plumbers, piano sellers, architects, glass installers – he stiffed them all. Not because he couldn’t pay them, but he wouldn’t pay them. And he told them, ‘You want to get your money? Sue me.’ My dad could never have done that. I’m just grateful my dad never got a contract with Donald Trump, because I don’t know what we would have done.

More than 60 percent of small businesses face payment delays. That can cause a serious cash flow crisis. So as president, I will explore new ways to arm small businesses with the tools to fight back and level the playing field. Part of the problem is large corporations are amassing so much power in our economy. Sometimes it’s called market concentration or even old-fashioned monopolies, but either way it threatens businesses of all sizes, as well as consumers. With less competition, corporations can use their power to raise prices, limit choice for consumers, cut wages for workers, crowd out startups and small businesses.

I mean, look what’s happening right now. In most of the country, the three largest health insurance companies in each state control 80 percent of the market. No wonder premiums are going up. As president, I will appoint tough, independent authorities to strengthen anti-trust enforcement and really scrutinize mergers and acquisitions, so the big don’t keep getting bigger and bigger.

I want every business to compete and thrive, and then I also want to do something else. Let’s protect and empower workers who actually drive our economy. Everyone who works hard should be able to share in the rewards, not just senior executives. So we’re proposing new tax credits to encourage more companies to share profits, on top of, not instead of, higher wages.

We need to support new organizing strategies for employees who too often have never had the benefit of collective bargaining. And we have to resist the assault on workers’ rights. Let’s say loudly and clearly: ‘right to work’ is wrong for workers and wrong for America.

Let’s also, my friends, let’s raise the minimum wage and support the Fight for 15 so you don’t live in poverty. Let’s defend overtime and go after wage theft. Let’s provide family leave that is paid and access to affordable, high-quality childcare. And of course you know what I’m going to say: let’s finally guarantee equal pay for women.

Now, my opponent and his chief surrogates like to say I’m playing the woman’s card. And I’ll tell you – right? – if fighting for working families is playing the women’s card, you know what? Deal me in!

And then finally, I’ve got a lot on my mind, but finally, we need to make it easier for companies to invest in good jobs here at home. As president, I will ramp up enforcement of trade rules by appointing a new chief trade prosecutor and tripling the number of enforcement officers. We will work with both parties to pass the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II. I want to direct $10 billion to create a ‘Make It in America’ partnership to support American manufacturing. And I want to take some of the ideas that worked when my husband was President and we ended up with 23 million new jobs and incomes went up for everybody.

That includes incentives like the New Markets Tax Credit for creating good jobs in poor or remote areas, from inner cities to rural communities ravaged – ravaged – by hollowed-out factories, ravaged by mines that have been shut down, ravaged by opiate addiction. It all comes down to this: When I say our economy should work for everyone, not just those at the top, I mean it. And we’re going to do everything we can to make sure workers are treated like assets, not costs. And we’re going to bring back infrastructure jobs, advanced manufacturing jobs, clean, renewable energy jobs, innovation, technology, small business.

Now, you don’t have to look any further than right here in Northwest Ohio. Just a few years ago, as you heard Kenyetta say, in 2009 you were in the eye of the storm. Jobs, homes, savings, wiped out. The auto industry on the verge of collapse. A lot of people were ready to give up on it. Well, that would have meant giving up on 850,000 people across this state whose jobs were tied to the industry. Donald Trump, for one, said rescuing the auto industry didn’t matter very much. Either way would have been acceptable, he said. ‘We could have just let it go,’ and that’s a direct quote from him. Everybody in Ohio who’s thinking about voting for Trump needs to hear that. At the time of the worst financial crisis in Ohio in 2009, he would have let you twist and fall. And for his running mate he picked Mike Pence, an ardent opponent of the auto rescue. Well, thank goodness the people of Northwest Ohio weren’t ready to let it go. You never gave up. You didn’t lose faith. And now, after a lot of hard work and sacrifice, the auto industry just had its best year ever.

But that’s not all there is to the story because in addition to that hard work, America, America, came to the rescue. Taxpayers like all of us, not him but us, provided the funds for the rescue. Union workers stepped up. Communities like Toledo came together to make it work. And now that the industry’s back on its feet, the auto companies have a responsibility to give back.

So I was delighted to hear that Chrysler is doubling down on Toledo, investing $700 million here to start building the next generation Jeep Wrangler, which could create about 700 new good jobs. And tens of thousands of UAW workers at Chrysler plants should see a big increase in profit-sharing payments above and beyond wages and benefits. Now, that’s the way it’s supposed to work, when we all help each other out. When we stand together, we are stronger together.

So what I want you to know is if you join me in this campaign, I will always stand up and fight for you and fight for your jobs and fight for your families. And I guess we have about 36 days left. The election’s going to be close. Every call you make, every door you knock, every friend you register to vote, could make the difference. You can text ‘join,’ j-o-i-n, to 47246 right now or go to hillaryclinton.com to sign up and volunteer. Here in Ohio you have until October the 11th to register to vote. And there are people with clipboards around, and you can go actually register today on your way out the door.

So we have just over a week to register, and then early voting starts October 12th. Let’s prove – let’s prove – that the American dream is big enough for everyone to share in its promise. Let’s prove that we’re going to stand together, make the smart decisions that we get the economy going and growing for everybody, not just those at the top; that we will stand up against special privilege and special interest; that we will be ready after this election to have an agenda that will really make a difference here in Toledo and across Ohio. So I’m here asking for your help, asking for your work, asking for you to be part of this campaign, and then when we win on November 8, be part of changing our country for the better! Thank you all and God bless you!”

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STAND

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Fasten your seatbelts! Seat backs in upright position! Ready for take-off? Labor Day is kick-off day for the final stretch of this very long campaign cycle. Hillary marked the day by unveiling HillForce One, a 737, that she flew from Westchester to Ohio where it was parked on the tarmac near Trump’s plane.  She welcomed the press aboard and joined Tim Kaine onstage at a holiday event in Cincinnati.

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Then she hopped back on the plane with her press corps and flew to Illinois.
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Win

 

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Hillary toured the John Marshall High School in Cleveland before she delivered an address on the economy that touched upon the many factors that affect the bottom line for Americans and for the nation.

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In Cleveland, Clinton Contrasts Plan to Invest in Ohio with Trump’s Tax Loopholes for Millionaires

Following a tour at Cleveland’s John Marshall High School on Wednesday, Hillary Clinton rallied her supporters and contrasted her tax plan designed to invest in Ohio with Donald Trump’s, which would provide trillions in tax breaks for billionaires and millionaires like him at the expense of working Americans. While Clinton has a “100-Day Jobs Plan”targeted towards families and small businesses, Trump would eliminate the Estate Tax, which could give his own family alone $4 billion in tax breaks. We can’t say for sure how much, however, Clinton reminded the crowd, since Trump refuses to release his tax returns.

Clinton also highlighted trillions of dollars of other tax breaks in Trump’s plan for Wall Street and big corporations, such as the “Trump Loophole” — a backdoor tax break Trump has proposed that lets the wealthy cut their tax rate in half on a substantial portion of their income. She promised to use that money instead for crucial investments including infrastructure, education, health care, and other priorities, adding, “Now, think of what we could do with $4 billion in Ohio.  We could build 280 new elementary schools. We could eliminate the outstanding student loan of 166,000 Ohioans. We could provide health care to 370,000 veterans […] Donald Trump doesn’t need a tax cut. I don’t need a tax cut. It’s time for the wealthiest Americans, whoever you are, as well as corporations and Wall Street, to pay your fair share in taxes.”

Clinton said John Marshall School represents the type of investment we should be making rather than giving further tax breaks to those at the top. She believes the opportunities afforded to students there – a “small schools” model in which students choose between directed programs in engineering, information technology and business and civic leadership – can be afforded to all students, regardless of ZIP code or background.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello. Thank you.  Thank you so much.  Wow.  I am so happy to be here.  It is great being in Cleveland.  Thank you all. I want to thank Kim Greytak, a teacher right here at John Marshall, for introducing me. And I want to thank all the teachers and educators, the staff, and the students of John Marshall. I am delighted to be here with your mayor, Mayor Frank Jackson. Also, with my longtime friend, your former governor, candidate for the Senate, Ted Strickland. With your county executive, County Executive Budish, I know is here somewhere.  And with my great friend who did an excellent job presiding over the Democratic National Convention, Congresswoman Marcia Fudge.

I always love being here, and today is particularly special, because I got a tour of this high school. And I first of all want to thank the people of Cleveland for investing in a high school that is really all about the future. What a stark contrast this high school poses to what happened here in Cleveland during the Republican Convention.  Because, honestly, they painted such a bleak, negative picture of America, I couldn’t recognize our country.  Listening to their angry speeches, the kind of negative view that they had of our people, Donald Trump saying we never win anymore – well, tell that to the Cavaliers. Tell that to our Olympic athletes, who are cleaning up in Rio.

There is nothing we can’t do if we put our minds to it.  And that’s how I want America to feel about itself, and how I want every American to feel.  And I saw the future.  The students and teachers who showed me what they’re doing here in robotics, in 3-D design, in laser design, in entrepreneurial and civic education – I for one am really proud of this high school and what it represents for the students here. And why is that so important for those of us who are no longer in high school?  Because we’ve got to get the economy working for everybody, not just those at the top.  And how are we going to do that?  Well, I know that too many families right here in Ohio are feeling a lot of financial stress.  Worrying about how they’re going to make ends meet, dealing with all the costs from childcare to prescription drugs.  I understand that.

That’s why I have laid out specific plans about how we’re going to get the economy working for everyone.  And I think it’s important, when someone comes to you and asks for your support, running for president, that maybe they tell you what they want to do, so that you can decide who you want to vote for. And sometimes, you know, I get criticized for doing that.  People say, oh, there she goes.  She has another plan.  Well, I do.  I’ve got an infrastructure plan to create millions of jobs fixing our roads, our bridges, our tunnels, our ports, our airports, our water systems, our sewer systems. As part of that plan, I want to start a national infrastructure bank so that we have public and private funds working together, so we don’t just wait on Congress to act, but we are building, rebuilding, maintaining all the time.

And it’s not just what we can see, as important as that is.  We need a new modern electric grid that can take and distribute clean, renewable energy across America. And we need to finally finish the job of connecting every home and business everywhere in America, from inner cities to remote rural areas to high-speed broadband access, so they can be part of the 21st-century digital economy. I was talking to a group of my friends who are teachers – I love teachers.  Thank you all for being here with me. And they were telling me there had just been a national survey done.  And the teachers were asked, do you ever assign homework that requires your students to go on the Internet?  And the answer was 70 percent, yes, they did.

Now, that makes perfect sense if you just saw what I saw.  You’ve got to have knowledge of the Internet.  You’ve got to be able to learn to use it.  It can spark your imagination, create new dreams.  I met young people – I said, well, what got you interested in computer design, 3-D design, robots?  They were interested in the arts.  They were interested in what they could do to design and make things.  So the answer was 70 percent of teachers, but here’s the problem: 5 million students – 5 million homes with students in them in America do not have access to the Internet.  And so we’re already creating a big gap.  A homework gap, which turns into an achievement gap, and doesn’t give every kid the chance to go as far as his or her hard work and talent will take them.

So when I talk about infrastructure, I’m talking about making our economy more competitive and creating more opportunities for more Americans willing to work for it.  Because I believe in the basic bargain: if you’re willing to work, you ought to be able to get ahead and stay ahead.  That’s how I was raised.  That’s what I want Americans to believe again. You know, this past Monday I was in Scranton, Pennsylvania with Joe Biden. And Joe was born in Scranton.  My grandparents – my father was born in Scranton.  I went back to Scranton every summer.  A lot of Christmas holidays.

My grandfather was an immigrant.  Came as a young child.  He worked in the Scranton Lace Factory making lace, which was a big deal back in those days.  I remember, we used to have lace curtains and lace tablecloths and things like that.  And my grandfather worked really hard, because he believed if he worked hard, he could provide a better life for his kids.  And he did.  My dad got to go to college.  He went to Penn State, where he played football. And then he took a job in the Midwest as a salesman, and then went into the Navy during World War II, and when he came out, he started a small business.  And he worked really hard.

And I used to go help him sometimes, because he printed fabric for draperies, and he had a print plant.  And he had two long tables.  And it was, you know, not a – it was just an old plant.  It was, you know, low ceilings, no windows.  And he would print that drapery fabric.  He’d take an old-fashioned silkscreen and he’d put it down, he’d pour the paint in, and then take a squeegee and then go from one side to the other, pick up the screen, keep going down the table.  And he provided a good life.  I grew up in a suburb of Chicago.  And so I know what the American dream is all about.  I am proud to be the granddaughter of a factory worker and the daughter of a small businessman, and standing here before you.

And so when I think about how hard my dad worked, and I think about him printing those fabrics and then loading them into his car, and delivering them to whoever had ordered them, and then expecting to be paid, because he had done the work, it just really hits me personally when people are standing up and telling their stories: they were small business people, they were plumbers, electricians, painters, who did work for Donald Trump, and he refused to pay them. That violates the basic bargain.  If you do your job, you’re supposed to be rewarded for your work.  Not stiffed.  Not told to go sue somebody.

And I can’t help but take it personally, because I think about, what would have happened to my family if my father had taken a job like that and put his heart and soul into it, bought the material, bought the paint, did the labor, shows up, delivers the product, and is told, we’re not paying you?  But person after person, small business after small business is telling the same story.  That they were not paid.  They were told to go sue Donald Trump.  Well, you’re a small business.  You can’t afford lawyers to go sue somebody.  That’s not the way it’s supposed to work.

So when I talk about creating new jobs in infrastructure, advanced manufacturing, clean, renewable energy, I also talk about creating more small businesses.  And small businesses that will actually grow and give more people a chance to fulfill their dreams, and will be part of the basic bargain, who will be paid for the work that they do, so they can stay in business.

Now, I’ve got to tell you, creating the jobs of the future means we’ve got to make sure that all Americans, not just young Americans, have all the education and all the skills that are needed.  That’s why I want to start with early childhood education, so that more young kids I saw right here in John Marshall across America, so that high school students can be better prepared. You know, when we stopped doing vocational education some years ago, we basically sent a message to so many young people: there’s only one way to be successful in America.  You’ve got to go to a four-year college.

That is so unfair, and it’s also untrue. Actually, if you look at job projections, more than half of the jobs that will be available in America in 2020 will not require a four-year college degree.  And so how are we going to get our people prepared?  We’re going to bring more technical education.  Not the old-fashioned kind, but what I saw here at John Marshall.  We’re going to bring computer coding, like I saw in a classroom just a few minutes ago, we’re going to bring engineering and design work, we’re going to give young kids in high school the chance to either get that education right in their own school, or go to a community college that will provide it, and give them credit to get a credential, an associate degree, or credit to go on to a four-year college.  So we’re going to do more on apprenticeship programs.

I want everybody who’s willing to work to be prepared.  I don’t want any excuses.  I’m a kind of no excuse person.  If you are willing to do the work, I want to make sure that we’ve got an economy that will produce the jobs.  And then I want to make four-year college affordable.  If you go to a four-year public college or university, it should be affordable. And we’re going to make community college free for everybody that wants to go to community college. And we’re going to help everybody with student debt pay down the debt. Get it off their backs.

Now, I think it’s – I think it’s fair to say, okay, well, how are you going to do all that?  That’s fair to ask.  Well, we’re going to do it in two ways.  Number one, we are going to tax the wealthy, who have made all of the income gains in the last 15 years – the super-wealthy, corporations, Wall Street.  They’re going to have to invest in education, in skills training, in infrastructure, because we have to grow this economy.  We do need to have the resources to do that.  And I’ve laid out what I want to do and how I would do it – closing the loopholes, creating a fairer tax system.  But I’ve made very clear I’m the only candidate who ran in either the Democratic or the Republican Primary who said from the very beginning, I will not raise taxes on the middle class. The middle class has to catch up to where they were before the Great Recession.

And so I’ve laid this all out.  And so independent analysts, economists and others, are looking at what I’ve said and what Donald Trump has said.  And in fact, according to an independent analysis by Moody’s Analytics, carried out by the man who was John McCain’s economic advisor, if you were to implement what I am proposing, we would create at least 10 million new jobs in the first term of my administration. By contrast, if you look at what Trump is proposing, and how he wants to give huge tax breaks to people who are wealthy like him, it would cost our economy 3.4 million jobs. Now, this is not me saying it.  This is an independent analysis saying it, that has tried to look at both of us very objectively.

But what does that mean for Ohio?  If we divide across the country by population, Ohio would gain 376,000 jobs under my plans and lose more than 123,000 jobs under Donald Trump’s plans. And it’s not hard to see why – because he wants to give tax cuts to big corporations, millionaires, Wall Street money managers.  He’s even created a new tax loophole that we call the Trump loophole – because it’s really good for Trump.  It would let millionaires and billionaires cut their tax rate in half on a lot of their income. Under his plans, Donald Trump would pay a lower tax rate than middle class families.  Of course, we have no idea what tax rate he pays – because unlike everybody else who’s run for president in the last four or five decades, he refuses to release his tax returns.  So the American people can’t really judge.

And then there’s the Estate tax, which he wants to eliminate altogether.  So if you believe Donald Trump is as wealthy as he claims – we can’t say that for sure, but let’s assume it – he would, by eliminating the Estate tax, save the Trump family $4 billion – and do absolutely nothing for 99.8 percent of all Americans.  Now, think of what we could do with $4 billion in Ohio.  We could build 280 new elementary schools. We could eliminate the outstanding student loan of 166,000 Ohioans. We could provide health care to 370,000 veterans. And we could sure rebuild every crumbling bridge in this state and fix a lot of the highways that are causing folks to incur expenses.

Donald Trump doesn’t need a tax cut.  I don’t need a tax cut.  It’s time for the wealthiest Americans, whoever you are, as well as corporations and Wall Street, to pay your fair share in taxes. You have been successful in this country because of everything this country represents. We’re going to stop giving tax breaks to corporations that outsource jobs and profits.  We’re going to reward those who invest in their employees again.  If corporations move their headquarters overseas, we’re going to slap an exit tax on them and try to persuade them not to move. We’re going to add a new tax on multi-millionaires, crack down on tax-gaming and close loopholes, and then use that money to make the kind of investments that will grow the economy for everybody.

So here’s the bottom line.  There are just 83 days in this election.  I keep track of them, cross them off. And for anyone waiting for Donald Trump to suddenly become more responsible, remember what a great American, Maya Angelou, said: ‘When someone shows you who they are, believe them.’ And I think it’s fair to say that Donald Trump has shown us who he is.  He can hire and fire anybody he wants from his campaign.  They can make him read new words from a teleprompter. But he is still the same man who insults Gold Star families, demeans women, mocks people with disabilities, and thinks he knows more about ISIS than our generals. There is no new Donald Trump.  This is it.  And you know, I hope you will talk to any of your friends who are flirting with the idea of voting for Donald Trump.  Friends don’t let friends vote for Trump.

So, now, here’s what I have to ask all of you.  I’m proud that we have run a campaign of issues, not insults.  That’s what I’m going to continue to do for the next 83 days. Because I think the details actually matter.  That’s why I sweat the details.  I really care a lot about what happens to the young people and the families and our seniors.  That’s why I’m going to do everything I can to raise the national minimum wage so that it is a living wage. I’m going to do everything I can to make sure that you have the health care you need at an affordable price – and get the costs of prescription drugs down because they are once again getting out of reach.

I was at an event the other day and a very distinguished doctor, the head of a big hospital in New York, he said, ‘We got to do something about prescription drug costs.’ This is not a – this is not a patient or a family.  This is one of the most distinguished doctors in New York City.  He said, ‘It’s getting to the point where I can’t prescribe certain drugs that my patients need because the insurance won’t pay for them.  Medicare, Medicaid, nobody will pay for them because they are too expensive.’  And he mentioned particularly a drug by Gilead that will cure hepatitis C.  And it is so expensive that a lot of Americans are being left out.  And you know what really is upsetting about this is that drug company sells that same drug all over the world at a much lower price to everybody else.

Now, I’m proud, I’m proud, that our drug companies invent drugs to cure really terrible diseases and treat chronic diseases.  I’m proud of that.  But let’s be clear.  Your tax dollars helped support the research that is used to create those drugs in the first place. Your tax dollars support the Food and Drug Administration that tests those drugs to determine whether or not they are safe and effective to be able to go to market.  And then we end up in America paying the highest price for those drugs that we have helped to create.  We have got to take this on.  And we can do it without hurting research and discovery and new drugs and new devices.

And there are two other issues that I want to mention respecting health because I’ve been on the campaign trail now for, well, about a year and a half, ever since April of 2015.  So I have – I have talked with and mostly listened to thousands of Americans.  Now, people talk to me about their jobs.  They talk to me about education.  They talk to me about student loans and the high price of college.  They talk to me a lot about gun violence.  They talk to me about the things that are on their minds.

But the most emotional encounters I have are when families grab my hand and talk to me about mental health and addiction. We have got to do a better job.  We have too many families and too many individual Americans whose lives are being either totally undermined or shortened because of mental health and because of addiction.  So I’m going to work on those things, too, as your president because we’ve got to tackle these two problems.

And I also want to defend the rights that Americans now have from all of the various attacks that people are waging.  That’s why I support human rights and civil rights.  I support women’s rights. And yes, I will defend Planned Parenthood against all of these partisan attacks. I support gay rights. Voting rights, which are under attack across America, including right here in Ohio. I support workers’ rights, the right to form and organize a union and bargain collectively. I support the rights of people with disabilities, who deserve more chances to be integrated into the economy and society. And yes, I will take on the gun lobby and try to get common-sense gun safety measures passed.

And you know, I know how difficult this is.  But here’s what I want to say.  I want to say what I said at the convention in my speech.  I am not at all advocating the repeat of the Second Amendment.  I am not at all advocating any program that would in any way take people’s guns away.  Here’s what I’m advocating: I want to help you stay alive so that nobody who shouldn’t have a gun in the first place gets one and hurts you or other people.

Because when I think about the three big challenges the next president faces: getting the economy to work for everybody, not just those at the top; keeping us safe and leading the world with steadiness; and unifying America, it’s not just a job for the president.  We all have to do our part. And when it comes to keeping Americans safe, I want to keep you safe in your own communities and your homes from gun violence, I want to keep us safe from terrorists no matter where they’re from or what they’re after, I want to make sure that we keep our alliances strong.  Because I know how important it is that we work together to defeat the terrorist threat.  And I will bring all the experience I had as a senator serving on the Armed Services Committee, as a Secretary of State, to make sure that America remains the most free, the most safe, the most important leader in the world.

But I also want to unify our country.  You know, I bet if we had the time, we’d find something that every single one of us disagreed about with everybody else.  We have different experiences, different backgrounds.  I think that’s part of the American DNA.  You know, our founders had some big arguments.  We have a lot of impassioned people who care about the future of our country and what we should do.  But at the end of the argument, we’ve got to come together.  We are the greatest example of freedom and opportunity and justice that the world has ever known, and we can’t do anything that ever undermines that.

And that’s why it is so important that we seek and find common ground together.  I did that as a First Lady.  I worked with Republicans to create the Children’s Health Insurance Program that now covers 8 million kids, I worked with Republicans to reform the adoption and foster care system, which I care deeply about. I worked with Republicans after 9/11 to rebuild New York and to make our country safer, to get healthcare to National Guard men and women.  I worked with every Republican I served with, just about.  I worked with Republicans as Secretary of State.  We got a new treaty with Russia to lower the number of nuclear weapons, and that took 67 votes, and we had to get Republicans as well as Democrats to agree with that.

I happen to believe I don’t have all the answers.  I happen to believe we are stronger together in charting a course toward the future. So I need your help. ‘Stronger Together’ is not just a slogan for our campaign, it is what I believe in my heart.  I will get up every day in the White House trying to figure out how we’re going to create more jobs, more opportunity, keep us safe, unify us.  And that’s where you come in.  I hope you will join this campaign.  You can do so today by texting ‘JOIN’, J-O-I-N, at 42746.  Or you can go to HillaryClinton.com.  We’re hiring organizers in Ohio.  So if you’re interested in working as an organizer, see one of our people who will be at the doors as you leave.

This is a consequential election.  I understand a lot of the concerns that many Americans have, wondering and worrying about our country.  About their lives, about their kids’ lives, about their retirement, about the purpose and dignity of their work.  So I know we’ve got challenges that we have to address.  But I am absolutely sure we can do this.  I believe America’s best days are still ahead of us.  If you will join this campaign, join our cause, together, we […] win an election, but chart a course of confidence and optimism. Getting results for the American people.  Come, join me please.  Thank you all very much.”

 

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The Stronger Together bus pulled up in front of the Fort Hayes Metropolitan Education Center in Columbus, Ohio this afternoon, and the candidates emerged and fired up the waiting crowd.  WJC was MIA.

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Give them a boost before the midnight FEC filing deadline tonight!

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Hillary attended Sunday services this morning at Imani Temple Ministries in Cleveland.  She briefly addressed the vitriol Donald Trump is leveling at the Khan family.

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Captain Khan and his family represent the best of America, and we salute them.

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The Stronger Together bus convoy rolled across the state line last night and into Youngstown, Ohio. There is something that struck me in the course of yesterday’s rallies.  A former Trump associate mentioned in a recent article that Trump wanted his name in very large print on a book cover.  We have all seen his private plane.   I suppose Hillary could have put her name on her bus, but she chose instead to put her unifying slogan.   That says a lot about who she is and why she is running.

The photo is from this behind the scenes peek at the bus tour.  There are more great pics here >>>>

 

 

In Youngstown, Clinton & Kaine Complete Second Day of Jobs-Focused Bus Tour Calling Trump Unfit to Be President

At a rally in Youngstown, Ohio on Saturday night, Hillary Clinton closed out the second day of a jobs-focused bus tour touting her “100 Days Jobs Plan,” the largest investment in American jobs since World War II they would make in their first 100 days in office. Clinton criticized Trump after he called General John R. Allen, who served with courage and honor, a “failed general.” Clinton also pointed to Trump’s volatile temperament as proof that he is unfit to be President. As Clinton said, “Donald Trump is not a normal presidential candidate. Somebody who attacks everybody has something missing. I don’t know what it is.  I’m not going to get into that.  But yesterday he attacked a distinguished Marine general, John Allen. He attacked the distinguished father of a soldier who sacrificed himself for his unit, Captain Khan.  He’s attacked immigrants and women.  He’s attacked people with disabilities.  It’s a long list, my friends. I don’t know, maybe he doesn’t have anything positive to say […] I think it is fair to say he is temperamentally unfit and unqualified to be president and commander-in-chief.  And as I said Thursday night, someone who can get provoked by a tweet should not be responsible for nuclear weapons..”

Kaine called Trump’s aversion to policy specifics unacceptable and asked, “do you really think that there’s nothing wrong with his tax returns? Do you think Donald Trump, if he wants to be president, should do what every presidential candidate in modern history has done and show his tax returns to the American public? […] We are too great a nation to put it in the hands of a slick-talking, self-promoting, empty-promising, one-man wrecking crew.”

Clinton and Kaine’s remarks, as transcribed, are below: 

TIM KAINE:

“Hey, guys.  Man, this is great.  Wow.  This is great. Hey, were we worth the wait?  Were we worth the wait?  Yeah, absolutely. It is – thank you for giving us this great shot of energy.  Hello to the Valley.  Hello to Ohio.  We’re so glad to be here on our bus tour. We’ve come out of a spectacular Democratic Convention in Philadelphia, and we’re glad to be in Ohio. There’s a reason why traveling through Pennsylvania and Ohio comes first.  It’s because you guys are so critical to the outcome of this election.  And I can’t tell you how proud we are to be here with you.  Thank you for this warm, warm Ohio welcome. We had great UAW introducers, Glenn and Robert.  We are so glad to be here with your formed governor and future senator, Ted Strickland.  We served together; he’s a huge, huge hero of mine. You’ve got one of the best congress members of the United States Congress, Tim Ryan.  Give it up for him.  Give it up for Tim. And then your state senator, who is the lead Dem in the Ohio legislature, who told me that he was going to get us the best pizza in Ohio for the bus on the way after tonight.  Give it up for Joe Schiavoni.

This has been a long day and a fun day, and I am so glad to be here with my wife, Anne, who until a few days ago was the secretary of education in Virginia.  But my wife Anne walked into the office Monday, before we went to the convention, and resigned so she could be full-time on the trail to make sure Hillary Clinton is elected our next president. And how great is this to be campaigning with President Clinton?  I mean – I started my career in elected office 22 years ago, and I’ve learned more on the bus in the last eight hours – about politics than I’ve learned in 22 years.  We have had a wonderful, wonderful time.

It has been a great week, and I tell you, when Hillary Clinton called me at 7:32 last Friday night – I mean, who’s counting? –7:32-ish last Friday night and asked if I would be her running mate in this history-making campaign in an incredibly important time in our country, I just can’t tell you how humbled it made me – excited, but humbled too.  I mean, this is just a remarkable woman, a remarkable leader, the most qualified person. As President Obama said the other night when he spoke – wasn’t his speech fantastic Wednesday night? As he said the other night when he spoke, Hillary Clinton is the most qualified person to head a ticket of any party for a long time, and probably ever. And so of course I was honored; as somebody who’s been a mayor and a governor and Senator, I was honored to say I would love to be on this ticket to help this most qualified person be the next president and to help tackle one challenge after the next and keep America moving forward with an optimistic and patriotic view of this country.  Of course I’m going to do it.

But there was one other reason that made me very, very excited.  As we stood out on the stage  together on Thursday night after she gave that magnificent speech following that fantastic introduction by Chelsea – as we stood out on that stage together with balloons falling and the history of electing – nominating the first woman of a major party to be our nominee, my 81-year-old mom, Kathy, was with me out on stage; Anne and my whole family, my mom and dad were there.  And my mom looked at me as the balloons were falling and said, ‘Tim, this is the best night of my life.’  And I’ll tell you why.  We’re backing Hillary because she’s the most qualified person to be president, but we can add to our excitement a little bit because I just was reflecting, as my mom said that, the number of strong women who have supported me through my 22-year political career – Anne supporting me just as I’ve supported her in her career. But think about – thinking about all the campaign managers and volunteers and finance directors and staff and voters, and the majority of the American electorate is women, and by far the majority of the electorate to vote for Democrats is women, and I have always been able to be in leadership positions because strong women were willing to support me.  And I think it’s just about time, after like 240-plus years – after about 240-plus years. I think it’s time.  I think it’s time.  I think it’s time for strong men to show that they can support strong women in leadership positions, including the president of the United States.  It’s just about time. It’s just about time.

So everything about this week has been great except one thing.  Now, I mean, everything’s been great.  Until I joined the ticket, I was under the radar screen and Donald Trump wasn’t saying anything bad about me. I mean, he wasn’t threatened by me, so he didn’t have to say anything bad about me.  But as soon as I got onto the ticket, Donald Trump had to come up with something to blast me about.  So let me tell you what he said.  The morning after I accepted the nomination of our party, the oldest party in the world, the Democratic Party, to be vice presidential nominee, Donald Trump said about me, ‘That Kaine, he was a lousy governor of New Jersey.’  I mean, I guess I was a lousy governor of New Jersey.  I mean, I don’t have the thick skin that Hillary Clinton has built up during the campaign, so that kind of affected me.  I was kind of feeling bad about it, and then I realized, wait a minute, I was never governor of New Jersey. I’ve never lived in New Jersey.

But look, you’ve got to give Donald a break.  He’s new to this thing.  So 50 states, and Virginia is different than New Jersey.  I mean, okay, so he doesn’t understand much; this whole thing is a big civics lesson for him. But he wants to be president, so go figure.  I mean, go figure.

We have been on this tour because what we want to do is talk about something really important: how to make sure that our economy grows and […] for a few, but for everybody.  Now, you all […] this. Hillary Clinton and I both grew up in small business families.  She’ll probably talk about her dad’s business, a drapery and printing fabric factory in Chicago.  I grew up working in my dad’s manufacturing business, an ironworker-organized union shop in the stockyards of Kansas City – welding and ironworking. And it was five employees in a bad year, eight employees in a good year, plus my mom, plus my brothers and me.  The old thing, if you’re in a family business, if there’s an order that has to go out then the kids are working on weekends or the kids are coming in on holidays or summers, and that’s what we did.  So we come out of a small business background, though, and that’s where jobs get created.  And we’re here to talk about – in Youngstown and in Pennsylvania earlier today and yesterday – how to grow the economy for all.

And this is – on the economy, this thing is super simple.  Super simple.  Do you guys want […] a ‘you’re fired’ president or a ‘you’re hired’ president?  I thought so.  I thought that would be the answer.  I mean, you know that Trump’s the ‘you’re fired’ guy.  These are the two words that he is most known for.  And I’ve got a prediction: after this whole campaign is over and after Donald Trump has lost and after people have forgotten everything about the race he ran, the two words they will remember about Donald Trump is, ‘You’re fired!’

Hillary has been just laying out the details and talking about a ‘you’re hired’ economy, a job-growth economy.  So it’s skills training, and it’s tax reform.  Right now we have a tax code that loves investors and hates workers.  We’ve got to flip that around.  I like investors; that’s great.  But we’ve got to love workers as much or more, and that’s what she’s talking about.

We have to promote manufacturing.  We’ve got to promote research – this great innovation.  We have to promote – I mean, what about, like, wages?  I mean, a minimum wage so you’re not under the poverty level.  Or what about the radical notion that women should make the same salary and wages as men?

One of the best lines in my opinion that – from Hillary’s speech the other night – she had a lot of great lines, but one I really liked because I’m kind of a – look, I was a mayor, I was a city council person, I was a governor.  I kind of like the details about things.  You know, it’s not just pie in the sky.  You’ve got to tell people how you’ll do it.  And Hillary Clinton said the other night, ‘I’ve got a lot of plans with some details to it.  I feel like I ought to tell you what I’m going to do.’  And some give me grief about that, but if it’s your kid or your business, it’s not just details.  It’s kind of a big deal.  Right?  I mean, you’re entitled to know what your president wants to do before you cast a vote in the ballot box, and that’s one of the things that I love about Hillary Clinton. The details matter.

If you want to, go home and go on hillaryclinton.com, and you can see how she’ll make college debt-free, and how she’ll invest $10 billion to regrow advanced manufacturing, and how she’ll make sure that we combat bad trade deals and only accept trade deals if they’re really good for American workers, and how we’ll get to pay equity, and how we’ll raise the minimum wage.  You go on that web page, you will know how she’ll pay for it and how we’ll benefit by it.  And that’s what a presidential candidate ought to do.

On the other hand, on the Trump side, he doesn’t give any details, folks.  You’re not getting any details.  I mean, when he tells you, ‘We’re going to be rich,’ and you ask why and he just says, ‘believe me.’  Or, ‘We’re going to build a wall and make Mexico pay for it, believe me.’ Well, wait a minute.  ‘Believe me.  We’re going to defeat – believe me.’ ‘Don’t worry, there’s nothing suspicious in my tax returns, believe me,’ Now, I know something about Ohio folks.  I know you ain’t gullible.

Do you really think that there’s nothing wrong with his tax returns?  How about this:  Do you think Donald Trump, if he wants to be president, should do what every presidential candidate in modern history has done and show his tax returns to the American public?  Absolutely.   Because what we’ve seen, and the convention laid this out, is Donald Trump has said ‘believe me’ to a lot of people.  Now, he’s saying it in 2016 to the American voters.

But let’s just go back before the election.  He said ‘believe me’ to a bunch of contractors who have done work for him, and then he stiffed them on paying their bills.  He said ‘believe me’ to a bunch of employees at his companies, and then he outsourced their jobs and laid them off.  He said ‘believe me’ to retirees who gave him money because they wanted to live in a condo community in Florida, and then they ended up losing their money, they didn’t get their condos, and Trump walks away with a lot of dough.  He said ‘believe me’ to thousands of students of Trump U. and what did they get?  They lost their dough, and they got a certificate that wasn’t worth the paper it was printed on.  When Donald Trump says ‘believe me’ and you believe him, you’re going to get hurt.  You’re going to get hurt.

And I just think we are too great a nation to put it in the hands – to put it in the hands of a slick-talking, self-promoting, empty-promising, one-man wrecking crew.  We just can’t do it.  we just can’t do it.  So can I ask you, is there anybody here in this place who believes Donald Trump? The guy who co-wrote his autobiography says about Donald Trump recently, ‘Lying is second nature to him.’ So when he says ‘Believe me,’ I got this question – well, here’s my attitude:  I ain’t believing you.  I ain’t believing one word.  Not one word, folks.  Not one word. Not one word. Not one word.  Not one word.  Not one word.

Not one – but we can believe somebody who has been about helping others since she was a teenager, a Midwestern Methodist Church kid growing up inspired by a wonderful youth pastor in her church in suburban Chicago who opened up the fact that in this broad world, there are a lot of folks who need a voice, who need a friend, who need a hand.  And from that early moment, Hillary Clinton has been battling, and battling hard, for families and kids, long before she was in office.  Long before she was in office.

So I said to you, do you want a ‘you’re hired’ president or a ‘you’re fired’ president?  And you answered right.  But I’m going to bring up Hillary Clinton now and say the real issue is– the real issue is, with Donald Trump, you get a ‘me first’ president.  With Hillary Clinton you get a ‘families and children first’ president.  And Ohio, I know how you’re going to pick.  We got work to do..  Let’s bring a warm Ohio welcome to the next president of the United States, Hillary Rodham Clinton!”

HILLARY CLINTON:

“Thank you! Thank you so much! Thank you all!  Thank you!  I got to tell you, it is so great, so great being back here with you.  I am excited about our bus trip, which started in Philadelphia, and we’ve gone across Pennsylvania, and now we’re in the great state of Ohio, starting in the Mahoning Valley!  I apologize for us being late.  We ran into a lot of thunderstorms, and it slowed us down.  I really appreciate all of you waiting.  It means the world to us to be here with you tonight. And there’s a big overflow crowd, and I understand they can hear us, and I want to thank them for being here as well.

I want to thank Glenn Johnson and Robert Morales for being up here to introduce us to the stage.  I am very proud to have the support and the endorsement of the UAW. I’m also very pleased to see our long-time friend, your former governor, Ted Strickland, a decent, hard-working, committed man who I hope you will send to the United States Senate in November. I appreciate State Senator Joe Schiavoni, and Joe, we do want that pizza.  We need that pizza.

And finally, I got to tell you, I am just the biggest fan of your congressman, Tim Ryan. How many of you saw him speak at the Democratic Convention?  Wasn’t he terrific?  Tim and I have a lot in common.  I started the Manufacturing Caucus in the Senate when I was there.  He has led the House of Representatives Manufacturing Caucus.  We are both commit to bringing manufacturing back so that there is a real path to the middle class for people who help to actually make things in America again.

Tim and I also share a love for hot sauce.  And he told me there would be one up here, but Tim, somebody got to it.  It’s gone. So I’m going to hold you to it.  I understand there’s kind of a special hot sauce that’s made right here.  Right?  Hot peppers! […] Yes, I want to try that. I told Tim some years ago that when Bill ran for President in 1992, I read an article which said that if you ate hot peppers, it would build your immune system.  I figured, well, it’s worth a try.  I started heating hot peppers back in ‘92.  I’m still eating them.  And I’m still standing.  And I’m still ready to go to the White House!

Now, we’re on this bus tour to highlight what our plans are to create more good jobs and raise incomes.  And we wanted to come to Pennsylvania and Ohio because these are two states where people still make things, where people believe that it’s possible to be a builder, to make a contribution, to have a good life for your family.  So we’ve been visiting factories.  We’ve been talking to folks, getting ideas.  And here’s what I think.  I think that if you agree that our major challenge economically is to create more good-paying jobs with rising incomes and good benefits so that more people in America – right here in the Mahoning Valley, across Ohio, and across our country – have a chance to get ahead and stay ahead, which is the basic bargain of America that joined this campaign.

I started that Manufacturing Caucus back in the Senate because I represented New York.  And in Upstate New York – some of you know because you may have traveled through there – we had a lot of hard-working people who got caught up in technology, with automation, with jobs being moved out of our country.  And they deserved better.  And we began to put together plans, and that’s exactly what I will do as your president.  We’re going to have the biggest job creation program since World War II. And we’re going to invest in infrastructure, we’re going to build and maintain our roads, our bridges, our tunnels, our ports, our airports, our water systems. There is so much good work to be done in America.  And it’s not just what we can see; not just the physical infrastructure, which is critically important.  We need a new electric grid.  If we’re going to be creating renewable energy, we’ve got to be able to distribute it.  We need to make sure every person, every home, every business in America has access to broadband.  Internet connectivity that will give them a chance to compete and win in the economy.

I said in Harrisburg Pennsylvania last night that that’s what I wanted to do, and I told folks that teachers had told me, just recently, there was a big national survey of teachers – and you know I love teachers.  And so these teachers that were telling me that after they did this survey, they found that about 70 percent of our nation’s teachers assign homework that requires kids to use the Internet.  And I see some teachers’ heads nodding.  Well, that makes perfect sense because we want our kids prepared for the future.  They’re going to live in the information age, and goodness knows, it’s going to be moving even faster.

That’s the good news.  The bad news is, there are 5 million kids in America who cannot access the Internet from their homes when they’re supposed to be doing their homework.  And there are parts of every state – because when I finished speaking last night, I went out, as I will later, and meet everybody, shake your hands – and some of the people there told me, they said, you have no idea how bad it is in places in Pennsylvania.  We still have dial-up.  A lot of places, we can’t get access.  That is unacceptable.  It is 2016.  We are going to finish providing broadband Internet connectivity to every place in America.

We are also going to invest in advanced manufacturing.  I can’t wait until I get to work with Tim Ryan and Ted Strickland and Sherrod Brown about how we’re going to do this. We’re going to invest, we’re going to work the public and the private sectors to make sure, number one, that businesses get the support they need in order to have the kind of plant and equipment that will enable them to be more competitive.  We are going to make sure that people have the skills that they can immediately put to work.

I am a strong believer is that, yes, it’s great to get a four year college education, and we’re going to make that debt free.  But I don’t believe that a four year college education should be the only path for people having a good middle class job, and a future that gives them and their kids better opportunities. We were in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and we were meeting with the management and the Steelworkers Union, a unionized plant, and they helped to train their people.  And then their workers are making, on average, $70,000 a year.  I’m telling you, we can do this.  Because there are now million jobs in America that are not being filled.  We don’t have enough machinists, tool and die workers, welders, coaters.  We need more skilled people in the trades. I’ve got a plan to encourage businesses to pay to train people, and to support union apprenticeship programs so that we get those skills and get ready to make a good future.

And, you know, I believe strongly that some nation is going to be the clean energy superpower of the 21st century.  I want it to be us.  Because there are millions of new jobs and businesses if we do this.  So we are going to grow the economy.  I’m going to invest $10 billion in manufacturing communities like those in the Mahoning Valley. And I’m going to do it by defending American workers.  We are not going to let Republican governors and Republican legislatures undermine the right to join a union, undermine the right to bargain collectively. I believe Right to Work is wrong for America, and I will stand against that effort.

And we are going to say no to unfair trade deals.  I’m going to appoint a special trade prosecutor to go after companies and countries that undercut our businesses and are unfair to our workers. We’re going to enforce rules of origin.  We saved the American auto industry from a certain demise.  And I’ll tell you, it was the Democrats who did it, wasn’t it? And it was the right thing to do.  The American auto industry just had its best year ever last year. Well, we’re going to keep that going.  And the way we are is, we’re going to stand up for our companies and our workers, and we’re not going to let China continue to dump cheap steel into the American market.

Another way we’re going to grow the economy is by supporting small business.  You heard Tim say his dad was a small businessman.  So was mine.  My father had a small business that printed fabric for draperies.  He had a – what we called a print plant.  It was a kind of low ceilinged, kind of dark place in Chicago, with two really long tables.  And the way you did this – because I helped him when I had to, and he needed the help – you would take the fabric, you’d put it on the long table, then you’d take what’s called a silkscreen, and you’d put it down, and then you’d take the paint – you’d pour it into the silkscreen, then you’d take the squeegee and you’d go from left to right, then you’d lift it up and you’d keep going down the table.

I know how hard he worked.  And I know how many opportunities that hard work gave my family.  That’s why I take really personally what Donald Trump does to small businesses.  This is not just a campaign talking point.  This is personal.  You know, because my dad did all that work – he would get contracts, he’d load the fabrics into the car, then he’d take them – he’d provide them to the hotel or the restaurant, the office – and then he expected to be paid.  I mean, that’s the way we do business, isn’t it?  I mean, my first job is I babysat.  I expected to be paid.  Every job I’ve had since, I expected to be paid after I did the job.

Well, apparently Donald Trump thinks he’s immune from all of those rules and requirements.  And so, person after person has come forward to say the same thing: I got the contract, I did the work, he wouldn’t pay me.  I’m talking about plumbers and painters, glass installers, marble installers, all kinds of people.  And then what happens is, you know, they do the work, they go to get paid – he or his minions say, no, we’re not going to pay you.  And, you know, it’s a kind of – like, a shock – what do you mean you’re not going to pay me?  They say, if you don’t like it, go sue us.  Well, if you’re a small business person, you can’t afford to sue a guy who puts his name on big buildings all over the place, has a battalion of lawyers.  This man has been sued 3,500 times.  He plays the odds.  ‘A lot of people won’t sue me.  A lot of people will give up if they try.  So maybe at the end we’ll have to pay them 50 cents, 30 cents on the dollar.’  That is so wrong, and it is something – it is something that people who have been treated like this are coming to the forefront to speak out about.  Because, you know what?  They don’t want America being treated by Donald Trump the way they were treated by Donald Trump.

I looked it up: nearly 98 percent of businesses in Ohio are small business.  So again, I take this personally.  We’re going to help small business.  We’re going to help get you more access to credit, cut red tape, remove obstacles so that small businesses can thrive.  But we’re not only going to grow the economy, we’re going to make the economy fairer.  Because the economy needs to work for everybody, not just those at the top.  And we need to be doing everything we can to lift more people up.  So we’re going to raise the national minimum wage.  We’re going to make it a living wage that can produce a good, solid, middle-class life.

And the fastest way to increase family incomes is to make sure women get paid for the work that we do. Now, I’ll tell you, this is not a woman’s issue.  It’s a family issue.  If you have a working mother, wife, daughter, or sister, it’s your issue.  And so therefore, finally, we’re going to put this right.

So I’m excited about what we’re going to do to create jobs, raise incomes, grow the economy, make it fair.  And we’re going to pay for everything, I’m telling you, and I’m telling you how I’m going to pay for it.  It’s pretty simple.  We’re going to increase taxes on corporations, Wall Street, and the wealthy in America.

Now, that is not because I’m against success.  We don’t resent success in America.  But it’s because that’s where the money is.  90 percent of the income gains have gone to the top 1 percent of Americans.  So it’s like that movie.  You want to know what we’re going to do?  We’re going to Follow the Money, and the money leads to the super wealthy and corporations and Wall Street, who need to be paying for the benefits that they have received from living in the greatest country in the world.

So as you can tell, I’m pretty excited.  It may be late, but I’m really jazzed up about what we’re going to do. And I don’t think the stakes could be higher.  Tim told you some of the reasons why Donald Trump is offering empty promises and totally at odds with what he’s done in business, how he’s treated people.  Well, let’s just take one more example.  He talks about let’s make America great, right?  Well, he talks about putting America first, right?  Well, then why does he make Trump suits in Mexico instead of Brooklyn, Ohio?  Why does he make furniture in Turkey instead of Cleveland? Why does he make barware in Slovenia instead of Jackson, Ohio?

Well, if you saw your great senator, Sherrod Brown, at the Democrat convention – he was great.  He said he bought his suit not far from where he lives in Cleveland, bought his tie in Ohio, bought his shirt in Ohio.  Now, I don’t want to stir up any rivalry with Pennsylvania but – my husband is wearing a shirt that was made in Reading, Pennsylvania. So if we’re going to make America great again, Donald Trump ought to start making things in America again.

This is going to be a very intense campaign, right?  One hundred days from today, people are going to go vote. Tim and Ann and Bill and I and everyone working with us, we’re going to work our hearts out, because I have to tell you this is not a normal election.  Donald Trump is not a normal presidential candidate. Somebody who attacks everybody has something missing. I don’t know what it is.  I’m not going to get into that.  But yesterday he attacked a distinguished Marine general, John Allen. He attacked the distinguished father of a soldier who sacrificed himself for his unit, Captain Khan.  He’s attacked immigrants and women.  He’s attacked people with disabilities.  It’s a long list, my friends.  I don’t know, maybe he doesn’t have anything positive to say.

But when you run for president, it’s kind of like a giant job interview.  If you were interviewing somebody to hire and that person came in to see you and that person spent all of his time insulting and scapegoating and blaming other people, and then got up and left your office, you’d be kind of wondering what does that person do.  I think it is fair to say he is temperamentally unfit and unqualified to be president and commander-in-chief.  And as I said Thursday night, someone who can get provoked by a tweet should not be responsible for nuclear weapons.

So here’s what I’m asking you.  We’re going to be back.  We’ll be in the Mahoning Valley.  We’ll be all over Ohio.  Because I want people to understand what the choice is and how it will affect you, your job, your future.  And just yesterday, the Republican economist who advised Senator John McCain when he ran for president in 2008, he looked at the plans that I’ve put forth and he’s looked at what Donald Trump has said he wants to do, and here’s what he concluded: Under my plans, America will create at least 10 million new jobs in the first four years. And this is not me saying it.  This is not me saying it.  It’s not even a Democrat saying it.  But then he goes on and says under Trump’s plans America will lose 3.5 million jobs. So this is serious business.  Yes, don’t boo.  Vote.

So here’s what I’m asking.  I am asking for your help in this campaign.  I want you to talk to your friends, your neighbors, your family members.  I know that there are people here in the Mahoning Valley who think they want to support Trump.  I just want you to try to have a conversation with them.  I want you to ask them please to look at the facts.  I want you to ask them to look at the stories that are coming out in the press every day about people who were stiffed, mistreated.  I want you to look at the stories of all the foreign workers that he hires.  I want you to look at where he makes the things he sells.  And then I want you to ask your friends and neighbors, ‘Is this somebody who really cares about the people of the Mahoning Valley, the people of this great state?’

And I want you to join the campaign.  Here’s what you can do:  Text JOIN, J-O-I-N, to 47246 or go to hillaryclinton.com.  And by the way, we are hiring organizers in Ohio, so if you’re interested, go to hillaryclinton.com and look for where we’re hiring, because we are going to reach out.  We’re going to register 3 million more people.  We are going to turn everybody out to vote.

Because like I said, I want you to know what my plans are as your president and I want you to hold me accountable.  I’m not going to sit in the White House.  I’m going to keep traveling around America.  I’m going to come back to the Mahoning Valley.  I’m going to sit down; I’m going to ask you what’s working, what’s not working.  As you heard in the convention, when I tell you I will try to help you, you can count on it, because I will do everything I possibly can to deliver results for you.

So I know the hour is late.  I know you have been incredibly patient.  But I am so excited to be back here.  I will be back.  My team will be back.  And we want you to be part of winning this election and moving our country into the future with optimism.  Thank you.”

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At the 107th Annual NAACP Convention at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati., Hillary Clinton spoke of recent shootings of civilians, assaults on police, and systemic racism.

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At NAACP Convention, Hillary Clinton Condemns Recent Shootings of Police; Reiterates Call to Work Together for Needed Reforms

At the NAACP National Convention in Cincinnati on Monday, Hillary Clinton forcefully condemned the recent police shootings, including the killing of officers Brad Garafola, Matthew Gerald, and Montrell Jackson in Baton Rouge. Clinton reiterated the pressing need to support our law enforcement officers, reform our criminal justice system, and pass common sense gun laws to keep our communities and police officers safe.  As Clinton said, “So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. [….] We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.”

In addition, Clinton announced a nationwide voter mobilization goal to register and commit to vote more than 3 million voters to be a part of this campaign. In the kickoff week alone, Hillary for America and the state Democratic coordinated campaigns will host more than 500 registration or commit to vote events across the country.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Hello, NAACP! It is so good to be here with all of you.

I want to start by thanking my longtime friend and colleague, my collaborator, and partner, and so many important causes; Hazel Dukes is a treasure. A treasure not only for New York, but for the NAACP and for our country. Thank you so much dear Hazel.

I want to thank your Chair, Rosyln Brock. Thank you so much Madame Chair. Your President and CEO Cornell Brooks, and everyone here today, including all the elected officials who have already appeared before you and those who will be addressing you during this convention.

And I have to start by saying we all know about that other Convention happening up in Cleveland today. Well, my opponent in this race may have a different view, but there’s nowhere I’d rather be than right here with all of you.

For more than a century, you’ve been on the frontlines, pushing America to become a better, fairer country. You and your noble predecessors have marched, sat in, stood up and spoke out – all to bring us closer to our founding ideals of equality for all.

And yes we have made progress, we see the results: in classrooms where children of all races learn side by side; in boardrooms and break rooms, where workers of all backgrounds are able to earn a living and support their families; at every level of government, where more and more the people we elect to represent America actually look like America.

And, of course, in the White House, with our wonderful President and First Lady and their daughters, Barack and Michelle Obama.

So as the President has said, and indeed, as he exemplified, we’ve come a long way.  But you know – and I know – that we have so much further to go.

We were cruelly reminded of that with the tragic deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, two more black men killed by police incidents, this time in Louisiana and Minnesota. And then in Dallas, five police officers killed while serving and protecting peaceful protestors, targeted because they were police.

And we saw it again just yesterday, when three police officers were shot in an apparent ambush in Baton Rouge. This madness has to stop.

Watching the news from Baton Rouge yesterday, my heart broke not just for those officers and their grieving families, but for all of us.  Because we have difficult, painful, important work ahead of us to repair the bonds between police and communities, and between and among each other.  We need one another to do this work.  And we need leaders like the NAACP. We need police officers to help us do this work.  These murders threaten all of that.

Killing police officers is a terrible crime.  That’s why our laws treat the murders of police so seriously because they represent the rule of law itself. If you take aim at that, you take aim at all of us. Anyone who does it and anyone who helps must be held accountable.  And as president, I will bring the full weight of the law to bear in making sure that those who kill a police officer are brought to justice.  There can be no justification.  No looking the other way.  We all have to make sure and pray it ends.

The officers killed yesterday in Baton Rouge were named Montrell Jackson, Matthew Gerald, Brad Garafola.  When they died, they were responding to a call about a man with a gun.  How many families, how many more families, would pay the price if we didn’t have brave men and women answering those calls?  That’s why I’m haunted by the images of what the officers were doing in Dallas when they died.  Protecting a peaceful march, talking with the protestors. Where would our democracy be without courageous people willing to do that?

So we all need to be partners in making law enforcement as secure and effective as it needs to be. That means investing in our police – in training on the proper use of force, especially lethal force. How to avoid using force to resolve incidents.

Officer safety and wellness – everything they need to do their jobs right and rebuild trust with their communities.  I’ve said from the beginning of my campaign, that will be my priority as President.

Perhaps the best way to honor our police is to follow the lead of police departments across the country striving to do better.  The deaths of Alton and Philando drove home how urgently we need to make reforms to policing and criminal justice — how we cannot rest until we root out implicit bias and stop the killings of African Americans.

Because there is, as you know so well, another hard truth at the heart of this complex matter. Many African Americans fear the police. I can hear you, some of you in this room. And today there are people all across America sick over what happened in Baton Rouge and in Dallas. But also fearful that the murders of police officers mean that vital questions about police-community relations will go unanswered.

Now that is a reasonable fear isn’t it? All of this tells us very powerfully that something needs to change. Many police officers across the country agree with that. There’s a real opportunity here for cooperation.

But that can only happen if we can build trust and accountability. And let’s admit it. That gets harder every time someone else is killed.

So now is the time for all good people who agree that the senseless killings must end to stand up, speak out loudly and clearly. I know that the NAACP, and so many of you individually, will do all you can to help our nation heal and start the work together to meet these challenges.

We must reform our criminal justice system because everyone is safer when there is respect for the law and when everyone is respected by the law.

And let’s admit it, there is clear evidence that African-Americans are disproportionately killed in police incidents than any other group.  And African-American men are far more likely to be stopped and searched by police, charged with crimes, and sentenced to longer prison terms than white men convicted of the same offenses.  These facts tell us something is profoundly wrong. We can’t ignore that. We can’t wish it away. We have to make it right.

That means end-to-end reform in our criminal justice system – not half-measures, but a full commitment with real follow through. That’s why the very first speech I gave in this campaign, back in April of 2015 was about criminal justice reform. And the next President should make a commitment to fight for the reforms we so desperately need. Holding police departments like Ferguson accountable. Requiring accurate data on in-custody deaths, like Sandra Bland. Creating clear, national guidelines on the use of force, especially legal force. Supporting independent investigations of fateful encounters with the police. So I pledge to you, I will start taking action on day one and every day after that until we get this done.

And you know what? When the 24-hour news cycle moves on, I won’t. This is too important. This goes to the heart of who we are. This is about our character as Americans. That’s why we also need to fix the crisis of mass incarceration. Eliminate the disparity in sentencing between crack and powder cocaine. Dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline that starts in school and diverts too many African American kids out of school and into the criminal justice system, instead of giving them the education they deserve to have. And we need to do, all of us need to do – and I look forward to working with the NAACP – we need to do a much better job of helping people who’ve paid their debt to society find jobs and support when they get out.

America is well known, and we want to be a land of second chances – but so many Americans never had a first chance to begin with.  So let’s give everyone a fair chance at rebuilding their lives.  As Abraham Lincoln said, ‘Give everyone a fair chance in the race of life.’ My plan would make significant investments in reentry programs for the formerly incarcerated.  And I will ‘Ban the box’ in the federal government. People deserve a real shot at an interview instead of being told ‘No,’ right out of the gate.

Then beyond criminal justice, we must, we must fight for commonsense reforms to stop gun violence. This is by far, gun violence, by far the leading cause of death for young African-American men, outstripping the next nine causes of death combined.  The wrong people, the wrong people keep getting their hands on guns.  And not just any guns – military weapons, like the kind the Dallas shooter had, which allowed him to outgun the police.

That’s why the Cleveland police, yesterday, demanded that the state suspend open carry of guns on the streets during the Republican National Convention.  And last week, the extraordinary and inspiring Dallas police chief, Chief Brown, told lawmakers, ‘Do your job. We’re doing ours,’ he said.  He’s right.  When he went on to say we’re putting our lives on the line. We’ve got to do better.

People who should care about protecting of police officers should be committed to getting assault weapons off the streets to start with.  And they should join us in instituting comprehensive background checks because law enforcement officers are nearly 50 percent, nearly 50 percent, less likely to be killed in states where there are checks on the purchase of handguns.

But even if we succeed in passing these laws and implementing them, we’ve got to go even further than that.

We need to do something about the racial inequities in our healthcare system.  Right now, black kids are 500 percent more likely to die from asthma than white kids – 500 percent! Right now a black baby in South Carolina is twice as likely to die before her first birthday as a white baby.  Imagine if those numbers were reversed, and it were white kids dying.  Imagine the outcry and the resources that would flood in.

And let’s do everything we can to create more jobs in places where unemployment remains stubbornly high after generations of underinvestment and neglect.  I’m a big fan of Congressman Jim Clyburn’s ‘10-20-30’ plan – steering 10 percent of federal investment to neighborhoods where 20 percent of the population has been living below the poverty line for 30 years.

That should go nationwide because the unemployment rate among young African Americans is twice as high as for young white people. And because of that, my plan also includes $20 billion aimed specifically at creating jobs for young people. If you don’t get that first job, it’s hard to get the second job, and it’s hard to build that solid financial base.

And because of the Great Recession, the median wealth for black families is now just a tiny fraction of the median wealth for white families.  That’s why my plan includes steps to help more African-American families buy a home, which has always been one of the surest ways to build wealth and security for a family.

We will do more to support black entrepreneurs get access to capital. And I want to give a shout out to black women, who represent the fastest-growing segment of women-owned businesses in America.

I want to unleash all of that energy and all of that talent. We need to view all of these issues also as part of the struggle for civil rights. Rosa Parks opened up every seat on the bus: our challenge now is to expand jobs so that everyone can afford the fare.  And let’s ensure that the bus route reaches every neighborhood, and connects every family with safe, affordable housing, good jobs, and quality schools.

Now, I know none of this will surprise those of you who know me. I’ve got a lot of plans. You can go to my website, Hillary-Clinton-dot-com and read our full agenda.

Because you see, I have this old-fashioned idea: if you’re running for President, you should say exactly what you want to do and how you will get it done.  I do sweat the specifics because I think they matter.  Whether one more kid gets health care, one more person finds a job, or one more woman entrepreneur gets access to capital to follow her dream – those just may be details in Washington, but it really matters to those people and their families.

And the truth is, we need to plan because we face a complex set of economic, social and political challenges: they’re intersectional; they’re reinforcing.  We’ve got to take them all on. We can’t wait and just do one at a time.

But the answers won’t just come from Washington.  Ending systemic racism requires contributions from all of us – especially, especially those of us who haven’t experienced it ourselves.

I’ve been saying this for a while now – and I’m going to keep saying it, because I think it’s important.  We white Americans need to do a better job of listening when African Americans talk about the seen and unseen barriers you face every day.

We need to recognize our privilege and practice humility, rather than assume that our experiences are everyone’s experiences.

We all need to try, as best we can, to walk in one another’s shoes – to imagine what it would be like to sit our son or daughter down and have ‘the talk’ about how carefully they need to act around police because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or even killed.

Let’s also put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to do a dangerous job that their families pray will bring them home safe at night. Empathy works both ways.  We’ve got to try to see the world through their eyes, too.

When you get right down to it, that’s what makes it possible for people from every background, every race, every religion, to come together as one nation.  It’s what makes our country endure.

And in times like these we need a President who can help pull us together, not split us apart.  I will work every single day to do just that. And what I’m about to say, I say with no satisfaction, the Republican nominee for President will do the exact opposite.

He might say otherwise if he were here.  But of course, he declined your invitation.

So all we can go on is what he has said and done in the past.

Donald Trump led the movement to de-legitimize our first black president, trumpeting the so-called ‘birther’ movement.

Donald Trump plays coy with white supremacists.  Donald insults Mexican immigrants, even an American judge born of Mexican heritage.  Donald Trump demeans women.  Donald Trump wants to ban an entire religion from entering our country.

And Donald Trump loves to talk to the press.  But let’s not forget, let us not forget: the first time Donald Trump was quoted in The New York Times was in 1973, when the Justice Department went after his company for refusing to rent apartments to African Americans.

It was one of the largest federal cases of its kind at the time. And when federal investigators spoke with Trump’s employees, they said they were instructed to mark rental applications from black people with a ‘C.’ A ‘C’ for colored.

By now, we’ve heard a lot of troubling things about Donald Trump but that one’s shocking.

This man is the nominee of the Party of Lincoln.  And we are watching it become the Party of Trump.  And that’s not just a huge loss to our democracy – it is a threat to our democracy.

And it all adds up, it all adds up to an undeniable conclusion:  I don’t care if you’re a Democrat, a Republican, an Independent — Donald Trump cannot become President of the United States.

And that’s why we’ve got to work together to get out the vote this fall.

You know that better than anyone.  That’s why the theme of this conference is ‘Our Lives Matter, Our Votes Count.’

I agree with both of that. And now I think your votes count more than ever.

That’s why we’ve got to stand up against any attempt to roll back the clock on voting rights.  Encourage everyone, everyone we know to stand up and be counted in this November election.

As Dr. King said, ‘Our lives begin to end when we become silent about things that matter.’  None of us, none of us, can afford to be silent with so much at stake.

That’s why, here today, I am pleased to announce a nationwide drive to get 3 million people to register to vote and to commit to vote in this election.

We are hosting more than 500 registration events this week, across the country. We’re going to minor league baseball games, college campuses, barbershops, hair salons, street corners. And with those we cannot connect with in person, we’ve created an online, one stop shop registration tool, in English and in Spanish.

And my team in Ohio wanted me to make sure you all know that we’re hiring.  We actually have a recruiter here today – he’s got a table set up in the hall.  We’re hiring paid organizers to help us get out the vote and get our message out all across Ohio. So please spread the word – we want great people on our team.  That’s the way we’re going to be successful. We’re not the red team or the blue team, we’re the American team, and it’s time we start acting like it.

I have no doubt we can rise to meet these challenges if we stand together– no doubt at all. And if we are looking for inspiration, let’s go to one of the officers killed yesterday. 10 days ago, Montrell Jackson, a young African American police officer in Baton Rouge, posted a message on Facebook, he wrote so honestly and powerfully about the struggle of being black and wearing blue in today’s America.

‘I’m tired,’ he wrote, ‘in uniform I get nasty, hateful looks, and out of uniform, they consider me a threat.’ He went on, ‘These are trying times, please don’t let hate infect your heart. I’m working in these streets, so any protesters, officers, friends, families, or whoever, if you see me,’ Montrell said, ‘and need a hug, or want to say a prayer, I’ve got you.’

That, my friends, is the strength of America. Men like Montrell Jackson. Despite all our challenges, that spirit of love and community must guide us still. We have to heal the divides that remain, make the United States what it should be, stronger and fairer. More opportunity for every one of our people. I would not be standing here on the brink of accepting the Democratic nomination if I did not believe, if I did not in my heart believe, that America’s best years are still ahead of us. So let us go forward with faith, with confidence, with optimism. Our children and our grandchildren deserve no less.

Thank you, God bless you and God bless the United States of America.”

 

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