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Hillary hopped on her plane in White Plains and flew to Orlando to rally Floridians.

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In Orlando, Clinton Vows to Protect the Rights of People with Disabilities

In Orlando on Wednesday, Hillary Clinton outlined her vision for an “Inclusive Economy” in the latest in her “Stronger Together” series of speeches. Clinton vowed to fight for an economy that works for every American, not just those at the top, and that welcomes people with disabilities, values their work, rewards them fairly and treats them with respect.

“I’ve always believed that the ultimate test of our society is more than the size of our economy or the strength of our military,” Clinton said. “It’s how we treat our fellow human beings, especially the most vulnerable among us. And on this front especially, I intend for my presidency to move our country forward. Together, we will make our economy and our country more welcoming to people with disabilities, because we all win when everyone gets to share in the American dream.”

Clinton outlined how she is the only candidate with a plan for an economy that includes more people with disabilities. She has been an advocate for people with disabilities from her days at Children’s Defense Fund through her appointment of the first ever Special Advisor for International Disability Rights when she was Secretary of State.

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below: “Hello, Orlando! Wow. Thank you all so much. I am so happy to be back and I want to thank all of you for being here today at the Frontline Outreach Youth and Family Center, which does so much good work in the community. I want to acknowledge your terrific mayor, Mayor Buddy Dyer, who was here earlier. I want to thank Pastor Wynn, Tiffany Namey, the chair of the Orange County Disability Caucus, and everyone – especially Val Demings. Where’s Val? Val – I know – got this crowd really whipped up, and I want you to stay whipped up for Val. She is going to be a great member of Congress for everything that we care about and are fighting for.

I want to thank Anastasia for that introduction. Didn’t she do an amazing job? I first met Anastasia when she was nine years old. She raised her hand at a town hall and she said, ‘My twin sister can’t speak. Because of that, they put her in a separate class, apart from the rest of the kids. But she can communicate with a computer. And she’s very smart and would do just as well as anyone else, if the principal and teachers would just give her a chance.’ I was just blown away by this nine-year-old girl – her confidence and how much she loved her sister.

So Anastasia and I have stayed in touch over the years. When she grew up, she became an intern in the Senate. I was so proud of her speech at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia too. And I’m very excited that she’s here with us today.

I also want to thank Orlando. It’s great to be back in this wonderful city with all of you. You’ve been through a lot this year. And what has been so notable is you’ve responded with grace. You’ve shown the world what Orlando is made of – strength, love and kindness. This is something we could all use more of right now.

I’m here today to talk about how to make our economy work for everyone, but first, I need to say something about two very upsetting incidents that took place over the past few days. First, an unarmed man named Terence Crutcher was shot and killed by a police officer in Tulsa. Then, a man named Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by a police officer in Charlotte. I’m sending condolences and prayers to their families; I know a lot of you are as well.

There is still much we don’t know about what happened in both incidents. But we do know that we have two more names to add to a list of African Americans killed by police officers in these encounters. It’s unbearable. And it needs to become intolerable.

We also saw the targeting of police officers in Philadelphia last week. And last night in Charlotte, 12 officers were injured in demonstrations following Keith Lamont Scott’s death. Every day, police officers across our country are serving with extraordinary courage, honor and skill. We saw that again this weekend in New York and New Jersey and Minnesota. Our police handled those terrorist attacks exactly right. And they likely saved a lot of lives. I’ve spoken to many police chiefs and other law enforcement leaders who are as deeply concerned as I am and deeply committed, as I am, to reform. Why? Because they know it is essential for the safety of our communities and our officers. We are safer when communities respect the police and police respect communities.

I’ve also been privileged to spend a lot of time with mothers who have lost children, and young people who feel that, as far as their country’s concerned, their lives seem disposable. We’ve got to do better. And I know we can. And if I’m elected president, we will – and we will do it exactly together, which is the only way it can be done.

Look, I know I don’t have all the answers. I don’t know anyone who does. But this is certain: too many people have lost their lives who shouldn’t have.

Sybrina Fulton has become a friend of mine. Her son, Trayvon Martin, was killed not far from where we are today. Sybrina says, ‘This is about saving our children.’ And she’s absolutely right. We need to come together, work together – white, black, Latino, Asian, all of us – to turn the tide, stop the violence, build the trust. We need to give all of our kids, no matter who they are, the chance to grow up safe and healthy in their communities and in our country.

Now, there are so many issues we need to take on together, and that’s why we’re here today. Because in just 48 days – can you believe it, 48 days – Americans will go to the polls and choose our next president. Well, I hope so. I hope so. I want to just stress that our campaign is about the fundamental belief that, in America, every person, no matter what you look like, who you are, who you love, you should have the chance to go as far as your hard work and dreams will take you. And that is the basic bargain that made our country great, and it’s our job to make sure it’s there for you and future generations.

Building an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, is the central challenge of our time. And I take it personally, because I’m a proud product of the American middle class. My grandfather started working in a lace mill in Scranton, Pennsylvania, when he was just a boy, and worked there for 50 years. Thanks to him, my dad was able to go to college and then start his own small business, printing fabric for draperies. And because of my dad and my mom, I could head out into the world and follow my dreams.

Every American family should be able to write a similar story for themselves and their children. And history has shown us – our history has shown us that the strongest growth in our economy is inclusive, broad-based growth – when everyone can contribute to our prosperity and share in its rewards.

Now, here is just one example. The flood of women into the American workforce over the past several decades was responsible for more than $3.5 trillion in economic growth. But as women’s labor participation has slowed in recent years, due in part to our failure to provide family-friendly policies like paid leave and affordable childcare, so our economic growth wasn’t as strong as it could have been. Women who want to work deserve to work. And whenever they are denied that opportunity, it’s not fair to them – and we all lose out. In a competitive 21st century global economy, we cannot afford to leave talent on the sidelines. When we leave people out or write them off, we not only shortchange them and their dreams, we shortchange our country and our own futures.

That’s one reason why I care so much about supporting working parents. It’s one reason why I’m such a strong supporter of comprehensive immigration reform. Because bringing millions of undocumented workers into the formal economy will decrease abuse and exploitation, and it will increase our economic breath and our tax base. It is estimated if we did this, despite what you hear from the other side, we would increase our gross domestic product by an estimated $700 billion in 10 years. Now, we need that.

It’s also one reason why we’ve got to break down barriers of systemic racism, including under-investment that has held communities of color back for generations. That’s part of building an inclusive economy, too. And it’s why I believe we need to do more to help young people, who are left behind in the wake of the Great Recession, find those strategies and opportunities that will get them moving ahead again. And we’ve got to help older Americans who’ve displaced by automation and outsourcing in our changing economy.

And too often, training and retraining doesn’t work as it should. If you don’t have a four-year degree, if you haven’t really had the chance to upgrade your skills over the years, it’s hard to just make a course correction. We need to have apprenticeships and community college and technical programs, starting in high school and moving all the way up to older workers. Whether you’re trying to start your career or you’ve spent decades contributing to our economy, you deserve better.

Now, these are some of the elements of my plan for an inclusive economy, and I’m going to hold up the book Tim Kaine and I have put out because we’ve actually put in one place all of our plans. You see, we have this old-fashioned idea if we’re asking you to support us, we should tell you what we’re going to do. Right? And today I want to focus on one area that hasn’t gotten enough attention. It concerns a group of Americans who are too often invisible, overlooked, and undervalued, who have so much to offer but are given too few chances to prove it. Now, that’s been true for a long time, and we have to change it.

I’m talking about people with disabilities, men and women, boys and girls, who have talents, skills, ideas, and dreams for themselves and their families just like anybody else. Whether they can participate in our economy and lead rich, full lives that are as healthy and productive as possible is a reflection on us as a country. And right now, in too many ways, we are falling short. We’ve got to face that and do better for everyone’s sake because this really does go to the heart of who we are as Americans. I intend this to be a vital aspect of my presidency.

I want to bring us together as a nation to recognize the humanity and support the potential of all of our people. And I want you to hear this because this is not well-known. Nearly one in five Americans lives with a disability. Now, some of those disabilities are highly visible, some much harder to notice. If you don’t know you know someone with a disability, I promise you, you do. But their disability is just one part of who they are.

Across the country, people with disabilities are running businesses, teaching students, caring for our loved ones. They’re holding public office, making breakthrough scientific discoveries, reporting the news, and creating art that inspires and challenges us. They’re veterans whose service and sacrifice has protected our freedom and kept our country safe. They’re working in the White House. Just last year a young woman named Leah Katz-Hernandez became the first West Wing receptionist who is deaf. So when world leaders come to the White House, the person who greets them is Leah. Think of the message that sends about how our nation sees the talent in everyone.

And Americans with disabilities are working on presidential campaigns. I know because several of my staff and advisors have disabilities, and they’re doing phenomenal work. I’m grateful to them every single day. And people all over America would say the same about their boss, their colleague, their employee, their family member with a disability.

Now, over the past few days, our country has taken leaps forward, not just in recognizing the humanity and dignity of people with disabilities, but in making long-overdue changes in our schools, workplaces, and communities so everyone can be part of our shared American life. Even so, not that long ago if you had a disability – if you couldn’t see, couldn’t walk, lived with dyslexia or muscular dystrophy or some other health issue – that one fact was allowed to define your entire life. Because of that and that alone, the world was closed to you. Not all of it and not for everyone, but for most people, basic essential things that others could do you couldn’t and never would. And that was that.

I saw this for myself, as Anastasia said, years ago when I was just starting out as a young lawyer working with the Children’s Defense Fund. One of my first assignments was to figure out why so many American kids weren’t in school. We looked at census tract numbers and we said, okay. How many young people between five and 18 live in this census tract? Then we would look at school enrollment numbers, and there’d be a gap. And we would say, wait a minute. Where are the kids? Why aren’t they in school?

I went door to door, along with people across our country, going into different communities. I was in New Bedford, Massachusetts. We saw a notable disparity there, and I soon realized that part of the problem was kids were stuck at home because of disabilities. There were kids who were hard of hearing, kids with intellectual disabilities. I remember one little girl in a wheelchair who was smart, curious, desperate to go to school. But that chair held her back. Not all schools had ramps or accessible bathrooms. Most teachers and aides weren’t trained to help her. So she didn’t get to go. It felt like the world had said to her, sorry, kid. Your life just isn’t going to be worth very much. And she and her family weren’t rich. They weren’t powerful. So what could they do about it?

That little girl reminded me of another little girl, my mother. She didn’t face the same challenges, but she, too, was clocked from a full and happy childhood – abandoned by her own parents, raised by grandparents who didn’t want her, and ended up on her own when she was just 14, supporting herself as a housemaid. But then something finally went her way. The woman she worked for encouraged her to finish high school. And that family showed my mother what a happy family looked like. After many lonely years, it was the start of a better life.

The core lesson from her childhood was that none of us gets through life alone. We all have to look out for each other and lift each other up. And I remembered that, sitting with that little girl in a wheelchair. My colleagues and I at the Children’s Defense Fund, along with others, gathered the facts, and we built a coalition of activists and families across America, and together we helped convince Congress to pass a groundbreaking law saying that children with disabilities have the same right to be educated in public school just like any other kids.

So we opened the doors to school, and then some years later I was so excited when the Americans with Disabilities Act finally passed, 26 years ago. It was bipartisan. The notion that workplaces and public spaces belong to everyone was something Democrats and Republicans both supported. And, by the way, I’m proud that some of the Democrats and Republicans who passed that landmark bill are supporting my campaign because they know where my heart is on this.

As Secretary of State, I appointed the first-ever special advisor for international disability rights because I wanted America to stand up for the rights and dignity of people with disabilities all over the world. And over the years, I’ve spent a lot of time working for kids with disabilities. In addition to Anastasia, who spoke at the convention, another young man, Ryan Moore, also spoke there. I first met Ryan when he was 7 years old. I was fighting for health care reform. He was born with a rare form of dwarfism. But he never let that stop him. He’s had so many surgeries, we’ve lost count of them. But his family was always there for them and – for him. And he was the advocate for himself as he got older. Now he’s a college graduate working in the technology department of his local school district. And he’s just one of the most optimistic people you’ll ever meet.

Listening to Ryan and Anastasia tell their stories at the convention this July made me think about all the people who never got the chance, never got the chance to get the education, let alone go to college, become forces for change. And I thought about all of the mothers and fathers across America who love their children more than anything and want so badly for them to have every opportunity that they deserve to have in America.

I’ll never forget something that the actor Christopher Reeve said. Some of you may be too young to know who he was. He was a huge star. He played Superman. He was unbelievably good-looking. He and his wonderful wife were friends of mine. And then he was paralyzed in a horse-riding accident. He once said that he had been thinking about a phrase that comes up a lot in our politics, ‘family values.’ ‘Since my accident,’ he said, ‘I’ve found a definition that seems to make sense. I think it means that we’re all family and we all have value.’ I couldn’t agree more.

We’ve come a long way since the fall of 1973, when I was going door to door talking to kids and families. But make no mistake. We still have a lot more work to do. We can’t be satisfied, not when over 60 percent of adults with disabilities aren’t in the workforce, not when businesses are allowed to pay employees with disabilities a subminimum wage [cheers and applause], not when people with physical and intellectual disabilities are still subjected to stigma and discrimination every single day. We’ve got to build an inclusive economy that welcomes people with disabilities, values their work, treats them with respect.

Now, one advocate after another has told me the same thing, ‘We don’t want pity. We want paychecks. We want the chance to contribute.’ As president, I’m going to give – give them that chance. First, we’re going to focus on jobs and incomes. I’m going to fight to give more Americans with disabilities the chance to work alongside those without disabilities and do the same jobs for the same pay and benefits. People with disabilities shouldn’t be isolated. They should be given the chance to work with everyone else. And we’re going to eliminate the subminimum wage, which is a vestige from an ugly, ignorant past. Good work deserves fair pay, no matter who you are.

Second, we’re going to work with our colleges and universities to make them more accessible to students with disabilities. To have a truly inclusive economy, we need a truly inclusive education system. So let’s raise our standards. For too long, accessibility has been an afterthought. Let’s make it a priority in our curriculums, our classrooms, and the technology our students use. It’s like what Anastasia said about her sister. She can communicate through a computer. Then let’s make sure kids who can communicate that way have the opportunity to do so.

Third, we’re going to partner with businesses and other stakeholders to ensure those living with a disability can get hired and stay hired. As part of that, we’ll launch a new effort we’re calling Autism Works to help people with autism succeed in the workplace.

Fourth, let’s build on the success of the Americans with Disabilities Act by finally ratifying the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It has the strong backing of leaders across the political spectrum, and it’s a chance to show American values and American leadership. And I have to tell you ever since I was first lady, I have had the great privilege of traveling the world on behalf of our country. When I was secretary of state, I went to 112 countries. And one of the things that I have noticed is how far behind many countries are in how they treat people with disabilities. Very often people with disabilities from the time they are babies and toddlers are locked away, basically forgotten. I want us since we have been the leader in this area to get that ratified and then to demonstrate to other countries what we have done and are doing to give dignity and opportunity to people with disabilities.

Now, these ideas are just a start. We’re working with advocates to come up with even more. If you’ve got an idea, we want to hear it. Go to hillaryclinton.com and leave your ideas because we are really welcoming this debate. This issue is very close to my heart.

I’ve always believed that the ultimate test of our society is more than the size of our economy or the strength of our military. It’s how we treat our fellow human beings, especially the most vulnerable among us. And on this front especially, I intend for my presidency to move our country forward. Together, we will make our economy and our country more welcoming to people with disabilities because we all win when everyone gets to share in the American dream.

Now, if you want some proof, let me tell you this story. It’s a story of a woman named Freia David. Now, some of you may have read about Freia in the Boston Globe. I’ve carried a copy of that article around with me because I loved it so much. Freia has Down syndrome. When she was 21, she got her first job, at the local McDonald’s. Her mother was a little worried, as any mother would be. She wondered, would Freia be able to handle being independent? Could she handle the job? Would she even pass the six-month training program? Well, not everyone in her class passed, but Freia did. And then – then she excelled at that job for 32 years. Her colleagues loved her, and she loved them. The restaurant became such a home to her that she’d bring her family there on off days just to hang out.

Earlier this year, Freia began to show signs of early-onset dementia. She knew that meant she had to stop working, but 32 years is a pretty good run, isn’t it? It broke her heart. One thing that made it a little better is the whole staff threw a party in her honor. Her family hoped a few people might show up. And in the end, nearly 100 people did: customers, colleagues and friends from over the years. The party lasted three hours. And at one point, one of Freia’s former managers asked for everyone’s attention. She turned to Freia, and she said, ‘We love you. We appreciate you. We respect you. And we are all better people for having you in our lives.’

My friends, after years of hard work and treating people right, isn’t that what we all want to hear? Isn’t that America at our best? We don’t thrive on tearing each other apart, or separating ourselves. We know we are stronger together. We believe in equality and dignity for all. And when we fall short, we strive to do better, not to blame and scapegoat but to improve ourselves, to move toward becoming that more perfect union that our founders hoped for. This election is a chance for us to move still closer to that goal, to make sure everyone can contribute to a growing and prospering America, to say loudly and clearly in this country, no one’s worthless, no one’s ‘less than.’ We’re all of value. In the United States of America, the greatest country in the world, we believe everyone is created equal. And you know what else we believe? We all believe love trumps hate.

Thank you all.”

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In Orlando today, Hillary participated in a roundtable discussion and visited the Pulse nightclub, the site of a mass shooting last month.

In Orlando, Hillary Clinton Condemns Terrorist Attack, Act of Hate on Latino LGBT Community

During a roundtable with community leaders in Orlando on Friday, Hillary Clinton condemned the terrorist attack against the LGBT community that killed 49 Americans and injured dozens more at The Pulse nightclub in June. Clinton reiterated her commitment to addressing gun violence and disrupting global networks that terrorists use to execute these attacks. Pointing to the need to pull together against hate and bigotry, Clinton said, “We have to stand against hate and bigotry. I was really moved by everyone who stood in solidarity with the victims and families here in Orlando, with the LGBT community, the Latino community, the Muslim community, with law enforcement and others, who have been truly tested and tried in the face of such horror and evil. People from all walks of life came together to help and support one another.”

Clinton’s remarks, as transcribed, are below:

“Well Mayor, thank you for that because that’s exactly why I am came here. To listen and learn from this community that has shown such grace and commitment to those who were lost, to their families and to all who were affected by this terrible event. I want to start by thanking you for your leadership. You were a steady and very compassionate voice throughout this terrible ordeal. I thank everyone who is here representing various aspects of the Orlando community.

I am pleased that my longtime friend and former colleague Senator Nelson is here as well. I want to just say a few words because I really am here to listen to what your experiences have been and what we do need to do together. We need to acknowledge and be very clear who this attack targeted: the Latino LGBT community, by any measure was the community that was most severely impacted by this terrible attack. What does that mean? Well, among other things, it means that it is still dangerous to be LGBT in America. I think it’s an unfortunate fact, but one that needs to be said, that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people are more likely than any other group in our country to be the targets of hate crimes. They face a very complicated, intersecting sets of challenges in general, and specifically even more so as people of color.

So after meeting with several representatives of the families, including a mother who lost her beloved son, I want to underscore what I have heard from so many across our country, but particularly from here in Orlando. We have to stand against hate and bigotry. I was really moved by everyone who stood in solidarity with the victims and families here in Orlando, with the LGBT community, the Latino community, the Muslim community, with law enforcement and others, who have been truly tested and tried in the face of such horror and evil. People from all walks of life came together to help and support one another.

There are several things I think we do have to do at the national level to support communities like this one. We do have to take on the epidemic of gun violence, particularly assault weapons, the havoc and horror that they bring in their wake is just no longer tolerable. And we have to be willing to stand as one and demand changes from lawmakers at the federal, state, and local level.

Second, we have to disrupt and dismantle the global online network that radicalizes people here in the United States, that even unfortunately, infects the thinking and attitudes of people in our communities, in their homes. They are communicated with, they are inspired, and they are even directed, and we’ve got to do a better job to stop that.

So we have a lot of work ahead of us – and I am very much looking forward to hearing from the panelists who are with us who represent a fraction of the community that has responded so lovingly. And I will do everything I can, both in this campaign, but after it, to stand with you and to support you and to try to promote the kinds of changes that will prevent this from happening to other people, other families and other communities in the future.”

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I don’t know what the point is supposed to be behind these weekend news blackouts.  A few weeks ago it was a Bernie Blackout.  This weekend it’s a Donald Blackout.   When there is a weekend  – especially when it’s a weekend with a breather from the hot and heavy campaign schedule, the fact-checkers have time to go back over the past week’s events and strike back.

This time, Hillary’s defense team had a chance to go back to Donald’s post-Orlando speech and make corrections with the help of services from sites like allspeechesgreatandsmall.com.

 

Hope this helps, Donald.

Earlier this week, Donald Trump addressed the nation after the worst mass shooting in American history. But instead of trying to bring the nation together, he gave a hate-filled speech riddled with inaccuracies, outrageous lies, and subtle accusations.

We took a red pen to the worst of the worst. Donald, if you’re reading, we hope these edits help!

1. He claimed we don’t have a screening process in place for refugees.

trumpcorrex1

Let me Google that for you, Mr. Trump: A quick search makes it clear that refugee applicants have the highest level of background and security checks of any category of traveler to the United States.

2. He said that the American-born Orlando shooter was born in a nonexistent country called “Afghan.”

trumpcorrex2

The shooter was born in New York City. Specifically, Queens. Also born in Queens? Donald J. Trump.

3. He claimed President Obama is responsible for ISIS.

trumpcorrex3

It’s impossible to connect President Obama’s foreign policy to the rise of ISIS. This is just more of the same fact-free rhetoric and fear mongering that we’ve seen from day one. And we’re still not sure what he means by “apology tour”—but independent fact checkers have widely debunked this nonsensical Republican claim.

4. He claimed Hillary Clinton wants to ban guns altogether.

trumpcorrex4a

This is another one of Trump’s many lies. You don’t have to dig deep to find that Hillary is calling for commonsense steps to prevent gun violence, including a ban on assault weapons—not a ban on guns.

5. He criticized American intervention in the Middle East—a surprising position for a candidate who hasn’t made his foreign policy plans clear.

trumpcorrex5

In reality, Trump has supported intervention in Iraq and Libya. But now, Trump has literally been keeping his ISIS plan a secret. The thing is, he doesn’t have a clue what his plans are.

Donald does not back off Hillary on weekends.  I will not back off him.
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Hillary has penned her thoughts on this sad and tragic anniversary.  If we had done something after Sandy Hook, which horrified the nation, Charleston might have been avoided. If we had done something after Charleston last year, Orlando and the nation might not be in mourning today. So when does it stop?  Thank you Hillary, Brady Campaign, and Democratic senators for fighting to regulate gun and high-capacity clip sales.

Hillary Clinton: An open letter on Charleston

Fri June 17, 2016

Charleston pastor: Gun reform is 'shared responsibility'

Charleston pastor: Gun reform is ‘shared responsibility’ 01:40

Story highlights

  • Deaths of nine people at Charleston’s Emanuel AME Church weren’t in vain, Hillary Clinton says
  • Clinton: Let’s bridge our divides, fight for change and remember that love never fails

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is a candidate for the Democratic nomination for president. The opinions expressed in this commentary are hers.

One year ago today, our nation lost nine precious lives. They were mothers and fathers, students and coaches, pastors and choir members. They were men and women of faith, each filled with passion and love, and with so much left to give. For many, time has done little to dull the pain of their loss. I still remember my grief and confusion when I heard the news. But their deaths have not been in vain.
“Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things,” Scripture teaches us. “Love never fails.”
Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton

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Stand with Hillary to prevent gun violence >>>>

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No candidate this cycle, or perhaps ever, has campaigned against gun violence as energetically as Hillary Clinton. As the nation continues to reel from and mourn over yet another mass shooting only last weekend, the anniversary of the last one is upon us.

A year ago today, a man with a heart filled with hate murdered nine people inside the Mother Emanuel AME Church. One of those people was my aunt, Myra Thompson.

Charleston is resilientNobody worked harder than my aunt. She would do anything for her church, Mother Emanuel. And since her death, I have tried to work as hard as she did at everything I do.

Not a day goes by that I don’t think about my aunt. So when this week, after tragedy struck again in Orlando, I knew exactly how much the victims, survivors and their families would need our nation’s love and support.

In the year since the Charleston attack, Mother Emanuel has shown what it means to be resilient and heal.

Still, it’s hard to believe that a year later, it’s still so easy for hate-filled people to get their hands on guns. But I am filled with hope that after this latest tragedy Congress will find the will to act.

However, I also know hope must be paired with action — action in the name of the ones we’ve lost. Action for my Aunt Myra. And I won’t stop urging lawmakers to act to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people so that this might be the last time our country comes together to mourn lost brothers and sisters.
With hope,
Andre Duncan
Loving nephew to Myra Duncan

P.S. Share this image to spread the word and say #ENOUGH to gun violence.

One year ago we lost 9 lives in Charleston. 49 in Orlando on Sunday. 26 in Newtown. Too many others. This has to stop. We need to change. -H

The Brady campaign strongly endorsed Hillary for her firm stand on this issue.  Let’s stand with them and with Hillary!  #ENOUGH!

Hillary’s plan to address gun violence >>>>

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, holds hands with Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, as she reacts to Fulton's statement during a rally at the Central Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016. Clinton spoke and then heard from mothers of victims of gun violence. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, holds hands with Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, as she reacts to Fulton’s statement during a rally at the Central Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016. Clinton spoke and then heard from mothers of victims of gun violence. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Lucia McBath, left, mother of Jordan Davis, and Maria Hamilton, mother of Dontre Hamilton, react as Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, talks about her son next to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a rally at the Central Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016, with mothers of victims of gun violence. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attends a forum on gun violence, Tuesday, March 29, 2016, at the Tabernacle Community Baptist Church in Milwaukee. From left are, Pastor Don Darius Butler, Geneva Reed-Veal and Annette Holt. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

A woman wipes her eyes as she listens to a forum on gun violence featuring Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, Tuesday, March 29, 2016, at the Tabernacle Community Baptist Church in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

05-21-16-Z-05

One thing is for sure, I am not going to stop talking about this, and I hope you don’t either!

 
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Proud of my Senators.  Are yours in this?

Dems take over floor to protest Senate inaction on gun control

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and other Democrats have taken over the Senate floor to call for tougher gun control laws and specifically action on keeping people on terrorist watchlists from buying firearms.

“I’m prepared to stand on this floor and talk about the need for this body to come together on keeping terrorists away from getting guns … for, frankly, as long as I can, because I know that we can come together on this issue,” Murphy said in beginning the filibuster on Wednesday.

Murphy began speaking at about 11:20 a.m., and the filibuster was still going at 2 p.m.

Other Democrats who joined him included Sens. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.), Joe Manchin (W.Va.), Patrick Leahy (Vt.), Al Franken (Minn.), Cory Booker (N.J.), Bill Nelson (Fla.), Dick Durbin (Ill.), Charles Schumer (N.Y.), Ben Cardin (Md.) and Ed Markey (Mass.).

It also won support from presumptive Democatic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

How are your Senators doing?  Here is the list of participants.

You can call to urge participation or register your support here >>>>

The number will be dialed for you and you will be connected.  Let’s do this once and for all!

Stand with Senate Democrats >>>>

Stand with Hillary >>>>

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Speaking on safety and security at the Virginia Air and Space Center in Hampton today, Hillary once again blasted Donald Trump’s lies, rants, implications, and outrageous policy plans.  She said a ban on people by religion or region would not have prevented the Orlando massacre since the shooter was born in Queens, NY not far from where Donald Trump was born – also of an immigrant mother. Of his planned wall, she wondered how you build a wall against the internet. (Firewalls notwithstanding, Chinese people get around the Great Firewall regularly to come right here to this blog from their universities and technical institutes, and American students know how to circumvent firewalls at their schools.  They do it all the time.)

First on CNN: New Clinton video blasts Trump’s response to Orlando massacre

“He wants to ban all Muslims from entering our country, and now he wants to go even further,” Clinton says in the video. “Just one day after the massacre, he went on TV and suggested that President Obama is on the side of the terrorists.”

Read more and see short video of her address >>>>

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It is Flag Day as well as a rare day for the voters of the District of Columbia who get to vote in the last primary of this season.  Sadly, they will not have that chance in November. Hillary Clinton began her day in Pittsburgh at a Democratic Party rally and will return to D.C. later in the day.

Yesterday, in the aftermath of yet another gun massacre in this country, this one with the highest number of casualties ever, both Hillary and Donald (as she prefers to refer to him) delivered speeches on how to prevent such attacks, although they were not really speaking on the same topic.

Donald’s speech was limited to one variety of attack – the kind that are inspired by or dedicated to jihadist organizations.  For Donald, the attacks on a prayer group in Charleston and first graders and their teachers in Sandy Hook were not part of the equation. The shooters came from good American, gun-toting homes after all.

It was hard to discern a proposed solution to the jihad-inspired attacks that were Donald’s chosen topic, however.  He echoed Hillary’s name over and over as if it had magical powers. Apparently keeping certain outsiders out will solve the problem despite the fact that the perpetrators of the Orlando,  San Bernardino, and Fort Hood attacks were Americans.

Hillary, in her speech, never mentioned his name and did specifically speak of radical jihadist  terrorism.  She removed an arrow from Donald’s quiver by calling it “radical Islam” – a term he repeatedly has attacked her for avoiding.  She proposed a multifaceted approach to combating the threat, but for her, what looms large is the availability of assault weapons.  She attacked the gun laws and the dysfunction within government that prevents dots from being connected. She did not directly attack Donald.

Today, on the other hand, she took him on with a right hook and a left upper cut.  She called him unqualified and called upon the GOP to get him under control. She assailed his casual relationship with fact and his obsession with words. She wondered,  “Is he suggesting that there are magic words that once uttered will stop terrorists from coming after us.”

Trump’s statements are lies—but he tells them because he has to distract from the fact that he has nothing substantive to say for himself.

“It matters what we do, not just what we say. It didn’t matter what we called bin Laden—it mattered that we got bin Laden.” —Hillary

In a similar speech the hour before, President Obama also commented on Donald’s insistence that something is wrong with the lexical selections of Democrats and changing the verbiage would turn the war. In Pittsburgh, Hillary took issue with notion that there are magic words that will dispel threats. Could not agree more!

Hillary has a pretty name. Repeating it over and over will not put the genie back in the lamp, though.  She did not cause the terrorism, has worked hard to fight it with sanctions and terrorist designations as secretary of state,  and, like President Obama, is on the same anti-terror team, although Donald seems to imply differently.  Today, Hillary did not refrain from calling out Donald – in very specific and substantive ways – not as a magic word.

Hillary Clinton in Pittsburgh: ‘What Donald Trump Is Saying Is Shameful’

Today in Pittsburgh, Hillary Clinton delivered remarks criticizing Donald Trump for his response to Sunday’s tragic terrorist attack in Orlando and urging national unity to protect our security and uphold our guiding values. Clinton specifically called out Trump’s suggestion that President Obama is siding with terrorists and asked Republicans to rebuke this dangerous rhetoric, saying, “History will remember what we do in this moment… Americans don’t need conspiracy theories and pathological self-congratulations. We need leadership, common sense and concrete plans.”

Clinton again affirmed her plans to defeat ISIS, to combat homegrown terrorism, to keep weapons of war off our streets and enact commonsense gun safety measures, and to keep our country safe while advancing the values of tolerance and unity.

A full transcript of Clinton’s remarks in Pittsburgh is below:

“Hello! Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you all.

It is so great to be back in Pittsburgh. And it is especially great to be here with the men and women of the IBEW.

I want to thank Mike Dunleavy and IBEW Local 5 for welcoming us to your house. We are happy to be here. And, I want to thank my longtime friend, colleague, advocate, Leo Gerard, who has been a champion, not just for steelworkers, but for working people – fairness, the kind of economy that lifts everybody up, for as long as I’ve known him. I am so grateful to have the support of the steelworkers and IBEW. It means a lot to me because we want to put you all to work. We’re going to have a lot of work to do in our country and nobody can do it better.

I want to recognize your County Executive, Rich Fitzgerald, and thank him for being such a great supporter, but, more than that, leading this county along with Mayor Bill Peduto, who has done such a great job to continue the renaissance of Pittsburgh. I want to join Leo in acknowledging your great Congressman Mike Doyle and your great Senator Bob Casey. There’s another mayor here, Mayor John Fetterman. John is here. John is hard to miss, so he’s here somewhere! I saw him somewhere earlier. I want to thank also City Councilwoman Natalia Rudiak, and I want to thank Josh Shapiro, your candidate for Attorney General, and a Montgomery County Commissioner, Reverend James Edward Brown, and, all of you for being with us today.

I always love coming to Pittsburgh and western Pennsylvania, and it’s especially great to be here after the Penguins clinched the Stanley Cup again! It’s great, quite a record now. They’ve got some ways to go before they match the Steelers in terms of winning it all but they’re on their way. The County Executive and I were talking, and he said something that really struck me. The Penguins did this the old fashion way: teamwork, hard work, and resilience. And that’s what we’re going to do in this election. That’s what we’re going to do in our country.

When I planned this trip, I intended to give a different talk today. About how we make our economy work for everyone, not just those at the top, how do we reduce the economic inequality that’s threatening not just our economy, but our democracy. How we rebuild our infrastructure, stand with our steelworkers against illegal dumping by China. And I wanted to talk too about how unions like yours, IBEW, and the steelworkers, and so many others, helped build the greatest middle class in the world. If anybody has a chair you can use it because don’t worry, the folks behind you have sat down and everybody is seated. That’s great.

You see, I draw from our history that labor is central to whatever we want to achieve. I’m going to be a strong partner and advocate for the American labor movement, for working people, for your rights and your opportunities to make the very best possible living in the greatest country on earth. These are the issues that are in my heart. I will be talking about them in the weeks ahead. They’re really at the center of my campaign.

But today, there are different things on my mind – and probably on yours, too, as Leo said.

We are all still reeling from what happened on Sunday in Orlando. Another terrorist attack – not overseas, but here at home. So many Americans killed and wounded. A hate crime at an LGBT nightclub, right in the middle of Pride Month. The deadliest mass shooting in the history of the United States.

The losses stretch all the way to Pennsylvania. Two of the victims were from this state. Akyra Murray, a high school basketball star from Philadelphia, was killed; she was just 18 years old. And her friend Patience Carter, also from Philadelphia, was shot. It’s a poignant reminder that even in a country as big as ours, we are all connected. And our hearts are with Patience and Akyra’s families, and all the families who are grieving now.

Since Sunday, we’ve been trying to make sense of what happened, and what we can do together to prevent future attacks.

Yesterday in Cleveland, I once again laid out my plan for defeating ISIS and the broader radical jihadist movement, around the world and online and for combating radicalization here at home, including a special focus on detecting and preventing so-called ‘lone wolf’ attacks like we saw in Orlando and San Bernardino. These attacks are carried out by individuals who may or may not have any direct contact with an organization like ISIS, but are inspired, primarily over the internet, by its twisted ideology.

I reemphasized the importance of working with Muslim communities here at home, who are often the most likely to recognize radicalization before it’s too late. After the attacks in Paris, Brussels and San Bernardino, I met with homeland security officials and Muslim community leaders in Minneapolis and Los Angeles, to hear their ideas for building stronger partnerships. We need to lift up voices of moderation and tolerance.

I also said something I’ve been saying from the very beginning of this campaign: I believe we Americans are capable of both protecting our Second Amendment rights while making sure guns don’t fall into the wrong hands. The terrorist in Orlando was the definition of ‘the wrong hands.’ And weapons of war have no place in our streets.

So the questions being debated this week about how we deal with the threat of terrorism are some of the most charged and important issues we face. And there are bound to be differences of opinion. In a country as diverse and complex as ours, I think that’s a given.

But I believe that despite those differences, on a deeper level, we are all on the same team. We may not see eye to eye on everything, but we are all Americans. And there is so much more that unites us than divides us. I have said many times, I think it’s appropriate for us, not to consider ourselves on the Republican team or the Democratic team, on the red team or the blue team, but to be on the American team. And after a terrible event, like Orlando, that’s clearer than ever.

That’s what we’re seeing in Orlando and across America – people of different faiths, backgrounds, sexual orientations, and gender identities coming together to say with one voice, we won’t let hate defeat us.

If we can count on that kind of unity and solidarity from each other – if even the families of the Orlando victims are speaking out right now against hate and division – we should certainly expect that from our leaders.

And I am sorry to say that is not what we are hearing from Donald Trump.

Donald Trump wants to be our next Commander in Chief. I think we all know that is a job that demands a calm, collected, and dignified response to these kinds of events. Instead, yesterday morning, just one day after the massacre, he went on TV and suggested that President Obama is on the side of the terrorists.

Just think about that for a second.

Even in a time of divided politics, this is beyond anything that should be said by someone running for President of the United States. And I have to ask – will responsible Republican leaders stand up to their presumptive nominee? Or will they stand by his accusation about our President?

I am sure they would rather avoid that question altogether. But history will remember what we do in this moment.

What Donald Trump is saying is shameful. It is disrespectful to the people who were killed and wounded, and their families. And it is yet more evidence that he is temperamentally unfit and totally unqualified to be Commander in Chief.

Of course, he is a leader of the birther movement, which spread the lie that President Obama wasn’t born in the United States. I guess he had to be reminded Hawaii is part of the United States. This is the man who claimed a distinguished federal judge born and raised in Indiana can’t do his job because of his – quote –‘Mexican heritage.’ I guess he has to be reminded Indiana is in the United States.

So maybe we shouldn’t be surprised. But it was one thing when he was a reality TV personality. You know, raising his arms and yelling, you’re fired. It is another thing altogether when he’s the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee for president.

Americans don’t need conspiracy theories and pathological self-congratulations. We need leadership, common sense and concrete plans.

Because we are facing a brutal enemy. In the Middle East, ISIS is attempting a genocide of religious and ethnic minorities. They’re slaughtering Muslims who refuse to accept their medieval ways. They are beheading civilians, including executing LGBT people; murdering Americans and Europeans; enslaving, torturing, and raping women and girls.

The barbarity we face from radical jihadists is profound. So I would like to have a worthy debate on the best way to keep our country safe. That’s what Americans deserve.

I read every word of Donald Trump’s speech yesterday. And I sifted through all the bizarre rants and the outright lies.

What I found, once you cut through the nonsense, is that his plan comes down to two things.

First, he is fixated on the words ‘radical Islam.’ I must say, I find this strange. Is Donald Trump suggesting that there are magic words that, once uttered, will stop terrorists from coming after us? Trump, as usual, is obsessed with name-calling. From my perspective, it matters what we do, not just what we say. In the end, it didn’t matter what we called bin Laden – it mattered that we got bin Laden.

I have clearly said that we face terrorist enemies who use a perverted version of Islam to justify slaughtering innocent people. We have to stop them, and we will. So if Donald suggests I won’t call this threat what it is, he hasn’t been listening.

But I will not demonize and declare war on an entire religion.

Now that we’re past the semantic debate, Donald is going to have to come up with something better.

He’s got one other idea. He wants to ban all Muslims from entering our country. And now he wants to go even further, and suspend all immigration from large parts of the world.

I’ve talked before about how this approach is un-American. It goes against everything we stand for as a country founded on religious freedom. But it is also dangerous. First, we rely on partners in Muslim countries to fight terrorists; this would make it harder. Second, we need to build trust in Muslim communities here at home to counter radicalization; and this would make it harder. Third, Trump’s words will be, in fact they already are, a recruiting tool for ISIS to help increase its ranks of people willing to do what we saw in Orlando. And fourth, he’s turning Americans against Americans, which is exactly what ISIS wants.

Leaders who’ve actually fought terrorists know this. General Petraeus said recently that ‘demonizing a religious faith and its adherents’ will come at a great cost, not just to our values but to our men and women in uniform and our national security.

Commissioner Bill Bratton of the New York Police Department said this kind of talk makes his job harder. He has Muslims in his police force, he has Muslims in the community, he needs everybody working together against any potential threat.

But Donald won’t listen to any of this. Not experts like General Petraeus or Commissioner Bratton, because he says he knows more about ISIS than the generals do. It’s almost hard to think of what to say about that claim.

But in this instance, Donald’s words are especially nonsensical. Because the terrorist who carried out this attack wasn’t born in Afghanistan, as Donald Trump said yesterday. He was born in Queens – just like Donald was himself. So Muslim bans and immigration reforms would not have stopped him. They would not have saved a single life in Orlando.

Those are the only two ideas Donald Trump put forward yesterday for how to fight ISIS.

Beyond that, he said a lot of false things, including about me. He said I’ll abolish the Second Amendment. Well, that’s wrong. He said I’ll let a flood of refugees into our country without any screening. That’s also wrong.

These are demonstrably lies. But he feels compelled to tell them – because he has to distract us from the fact that he has nothing substantive to say for himself.

Much of the rest of his speech was spent denigrating not just the President, but the efforts of all the brave American service members, law enforcement agents, intelligence officers, diplomats and others who have worked so hard to keep our country safe. Donald says our military is a disaster and the world is laughing at us. Wrong again.

Since 9/11, America has done a great deal at home and abroad to stop terrorists. Thousands of Americans have fought and died. We have worked intensively with our allies, engaged in fierce and vital debates here at home about how far our government should go in monitoring threats. We have vastly increased security measures at airports, train stations, power plants and many other places. And the American people, we have all become more vigilant, even while we have carried on living our lives as normally as possible.

It has been a long and difficult effort. We’ve had successes, and we’ve also had failures. But one thing’s for sure: the fight against terrorism has never been simple.

We need a Commander-in-Chief who is up to these challenges – who can grapple with them in all their complexity – someone with real plans and real solutions that actually address the problems we face. And we need someone with the temperament and experience to make those hard choices in the Situation Room – not a loose cannon who could easily lead us into war.

One more thing. Donald Trump has been very clear about what he won’t do. He won’t stand up to the gun lobby.

The terrorist who killed 49 people and wounded 53 others in Orlando did it with two guns: a handgun and a Sig Sauer MCX rifle. If you don’t know what that is, I urge you to Google it. See it for yourself.

This man had been investigated by the FBI for months. But we couldn’t stop him from buying a powerful weapon that he used to slaughter Americans in large numbers.

Let’s get this straight. We have reached the point where people can’t board planes with full bottles of shampoo – but people being watched by the FBI for suspected terrorist links can buy a gun with no questions asked. That is absurd.

It just seems like western Pennsylvania common sense, if you’re too dangerous to get on a plane, you’re too dangerous to buy a gun.

Enough is enough. Now is time for seriousness and resolve.

We need to go after ISIS overseas, we need to protect Americans here at home, counter their poisonous ideologies, support our first responders, take a hard look at our gun laws and we need to stand with the LGBT community and peaceful Muslim Americans, today and always.

In the days and weeks ahead, I will have more to say about how we will work together to keep our country and our citizens safe and take the fight to the terrorists. None of this will be easy. And none of it will be helped by anything that Donald Trump has to offer.

This is a time to set aside fear and division, and reach for unity. America is strongest when we all feel like we have a stake in our country. When we all have real chance to live up to our God-given potential, and we want others here to have that chance, too.

We’ve always been a country of ‘we,’ not ‘me.’ And we’ve always been stronger together.

We are stronger when people can participate in our democracy, share in the rewards of our economy, and contribute to our communities.

When we bridge our divides and lift each other up, instead of tearing each other down.

Here in Pennsylvania, and across America, I have listened to so many people tell me about the problems that keep you and your families up at night. Despite all the progress we’ve made, there’s not yet enough growth, which creates good jobs and raises incomes. There’s not yet enough economic fairness, so that everyone who works hard can share in the rewards. We need both – a ‘growth and fairness’ economy. Where profits and paychecks rise together.

So many people have talked to me about how the bonds that hold us together as one national community are strained – by too much inequality, too little upward mobility, social and political divisions that have diminished our trust in each other and our confidence in our shared future.

As your president, I will work every day to break down all the barriers holding you back and keeping us apart. And I will be on your side.

I’ll have the back of every steelworker getting knocked around by unfair competition. Of every working mom trying to raise her kids on minimum wage or unequal pay. Of every union member struggling to keep going in the face of concerted attacks on workers’ rights – because ‘right to work’ is wrong for workers, and we need to stand strong with unions.

Together, I want us to forge a new sense of connection and a shared responsibility to each other and our nation.

I know that’s possible, because I have seen it throughout our history – including just this week.

Some of you may have noticed a letter that went viral on the internet over the past few days. The letter is from George H.W. Bush’s presidential library. I hadn’t read it in a long time – until yesterday. And it moved me to tears, just like it did all those years ago.

It’s the letter that President Bush left in the Oval Office for my husband, back in January of 1993. They had just fought a fierce campaign. Bill won, President Bush lost. In a democracy, that’s how it goes.

But when Bill walked into that office for the very first time as President, that note was waiting for him. It had some good advice about staying focused on what mattered, despite the critics. It wished him happiness. And it concluded with these words:

‘You will be our President when you read this note. I wish you well. I wish your family well. Your success is now our country’s success. And I am rooting hard for you. George.’

That’s the America we love. That is what we cherish and expect.

So let us come together, we can disagree without being disagreeable, we can root for each other’s success. Where our President is everyone’s President, and our future belongs to us all.

Let’s make this once again the big-hearted, fair-minded country we all know and love. Thank you all very much.”

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Hillary Clinton focused her comments squarely on gun regulations when she  spoke by phone to Chris Cuomo this morning.  She called for statesmanship not partisanship in the wake of the terrorist attack in Orlando.

Cuomo pressed her on Trump’s charge that she refuses radical Islamist as a term. She said that she has not rejected the term but will not demonize a religion citing risk in alienating American Muslim community.

“We cannot demonize, demagogue, and declare war on an entire religion…Hate is not the answer to hate.” —Hillary

Hillary turned the conversation to the bigger issue of gun regulations.  Florida does not regulate assault weapons or high-capacity magazines.  Hillary has called for common sense gun reform many times in the course of her campaign.  She called for reinstatement of the  assault weapons ban.

Asked about the right to bear arms, she responded that there are common sense steps that can be taken and pointed to 23 shootings this year by toddlers.

Cuomo asked her to respond to Trump’s messages.  She called his rhetoric dangerous. We have to prevent radicalization. But we also have to be aware that people who are not radicalized also use guns to hurt people. She wants to protect people from ISIS but also from others who inflict injury and death outside of jihadist motivations.

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Donald Trump called in later and repeatedly said “we are letting in too many Syrian refugees.”  The shooter was of Afghan descent and, like Trump, was born in New York. He said, ” We are taking in too many people like this guy.”

 

 

 

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I join Americans in praying for the victims of the attack in Orlando, their families and the first responders who did everything they could to save lives.

This was an act of terror. Law enforcement and intelligence agencies are hard at work, and we will learn more in the hours and days ahead. For now, we can say for certain that we need to redouble our efforts to defend our country from threats at home and abroad. That means defeating international terror groups, working with allies and partners to go after them wherever they are, countering their attempts to recruit people here and everywhere, and hardening our defenses at home. It also means refusing to be intimidated and staying true to our values.

This was also an act of hate. The gunman attacked an LGBT nightclub during Pride Month. To the LGBT community: please know that you have millions of allies across our country. I am one of them. We will keep fighting for your right to live freely, openly and without fear. Hate has absolutely no place in America.

Finally, we need to keep guns like the ones used last night out of the hands of terrorists or other violent criminals. This is the deadliest mass shooting in the history of the United States and it reminds us once more that weapons of war have no place on our streets.

This is a time to stand together and resolve to do everything we can to defend our communities and country.

giphy

I will add my two cents here, because this is the second shooting in two nights in Orlando. It is shocking, wrong, and indefensible. No matter what the motivation is, there are too many shootings and too many guns. One candidate has vowed to stand against the gun lobby.  One.  50 more mothers joined this circle today – a club no one wants to join.

05-21-16-Z-03
Why is this on the market?

The gun used in the Orlando shooting is becoming mass shooters’ weapon of choice

The Washington Post
Christopher Ingraham

In this photo illustration a Rock River Arms AR-15 rifle is seen on December 18, 2012 in Miami, Florida. The weapon is similar in style to the weapon police say was used in the mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, FL. © Photo illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images In this photo illustration a Rock River Arms AR-15 rifle is seen on December 18, 2012 in Miami, Florida. The weapon is similar in style to the weapon police say was… Last night in Orlando, a man armed with an assault-style rifle killed at least 50 people and wounded 53 others in a crowded nightclub.

Six months ago, in San Bernardino, Calif., a man and woman armed with assault-style rifles killed 14 people and wounded 20 others at a holiday party.

In 2012, in Aurora, Colo., a man armed with an assault-style rifle killed 12 people and wounded 58 others in a crowded movie theater.

Also in 2012, in Newtown Conn., a man armed with an assault-style rifle killed 28 people and wounded 2 others at an elementary school.

One common denominator behind these and other high-casualty mass shootings in recent years is the use of assault style rifles, capable of firing many rounds of ammunition in a relatively short period of time, with high accuracy.

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