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Remarks At USA Pavilion Gala Dinner

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
U.S. Pavilion at Shanghai Expo
Shanghai, China
May 22, 2010

MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, good evening. Please give a warm welcome to the commissioner general of the USA Pavilion, Jose Villarreal.

(Applause.)

MR. VILLARREAL: Where is Lavinia? Oh, there you are. Ni hao. Welcome to the USA Pavilion.

One of the things that I am most proud of is the role being served by our student ambassadors. Two weeks ago they helped me welcome President Hu Jintao to our pavilion. And tonight, representing all student ambassadors, is Lavinia Pement of Chicago, who will be translating for me.

(Applause.)

This is obviously a very exciting day, as we celebrate U.S. participation at the Shanghai World Expo. It is a day that some doubted would ever come. But in the true spirit of our pavilion theme of rising to the challenge, we triumphed, and we are here today.

(Applause.)

It is especially exciting, because all of the key participants are here with us, including our financial sponsors, our government officials, the USA Pavilion board of directors, the Shanghai ex-pat community, and our Chinese Expo partners, who have worked with us, hand in hand.

I would like to acknowledge Ambassador Jon Huntsman and Consul General Bea Camp for their continuous support and guidance.

(Applause.)

Let me also say to our Chinese Expo friends that you have made me, our student ambassadors, and our entire USA Pavilion staff feel totally at home in Shanghai. And for that we are profoundly grateful.

Tonight we are privileged to be joined by the person who brought us all here today, and the person most responsible for U.S. participation at the Shanghai World Expo. Ladies and gentlemen, please help me welcome U.S. Secretary of State, the Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton.

(Applause.)

MR. VILLARREAL: Thank you for giving me this opportunity.

SECRETARY CLINTON: You have done so well with it. Thank you, and good evening. And welcome to the USA Pavilion, here at Shanghai Expo. I want to thank Jose for that introduction, but I want to thank him more for his leadership as Commissioner General. When I asked Jose to take on this important responsibility, he knew that we had not built the pavilion, he knew that we had not raised all the money for the pavilion. And I told him, “Well, Jose, you and I will have to go and build it, and then entertain people.”

(Laughter.)

And I am very pleased to note that, in recognition of the importance of the Shanghai World Expo to advancing U.S.-China relations, President Obama has accorded Jose the personal rank of Ambassador.

(Applause.)

So we will now, I guess, call you Ambassador Commissioner General.

(Laughter.)

Establishing an American presence at this Expo worthy of our great country was quite a journey.

There is a poem from the Southern Song Dynasty that reads: “After endless mountains and rivers that leave doubt whether there is a path out, suddenly one encounters the shade of a willow, bright flowers and a lovely village.” Well, I am very pleased that we have finally arrived at our lovely village.

(Applause.)

This was a real team effort, a partnership that brought together our government, the private sector, the Chinese-American community, and so many friends and supporters. So, let me offer a few thank-yous.

To Ambassador Jon Huntsman and Consul General Bea Camp, and all the men and women of the U.S. Mission in China, we thank you.

(Applause.)

To Ken Jarett and the board, staff, and volunteers of the USA Pavilion, including our student ambassadors who represent not just the welcoming spirit of our Pavilion, but the openness of our country. And to Ambassador Elizabeth Bagley and her deputy, Kris Balderston, and our corporate partners — your generosity and commitment has made all of this possible. And I am very grateful to each and every one of you.

(Applause.)

And finally, I want to express our deep appreciation to our Chinese hosts. It is a great honor to have with us Ambassador Zhang, Vice Foreign Minister Cui, Vice Finance Minister Li, and Vice Mayor Tang here with us this evening. Earlier today I had the privilege of visiting the China Pavilion, with its sweeping panorama of a great nation. The ancient Riverside scroll, which depicts another period of dramatic change and development, has been transformed through the magic of technology into a vivid symbol of the new China. This entire Expo, the largest in history, is a testament to the hospitality and energy of the Chinese people. And all around us we see that the glory of the past is matched by the dynamism of the present and the promise of the future.

The shape of that future depends, to a significant degree, on the evolving relationship between the United States and China. If our relations are defined by win-win solutions rather than zero-sum rivalries, we will thrive and prosper together. Now, we may not always agree on every issue, but we should seek and seize opportunities such as this Expo to build greater understanding between our peoples.

This USA Pavilion embodies many of the qualities that make my country a vibrant and prosperous nation: innovation, sustainability, diversity, the free exchange of ideas. And it is a model of environmental responsibility. And I am proud to announce that the Pavilion will be carbon neutral for the entire duration of the Expo.

700,000 people have already visited this pavilion. And one of the most moving displays is the tribute to the millions of Chinese Americans who have contributed so much to the cultural and economic development of the United States. From Yo-Yo Ma to I.M. Pei to Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and Energy Secretary Chu, Chinese-Americans have achieved great success in business, government, the arts, sciences and sports. And, to that end, I was pleased to hear that the Buffalo Bills have recently drafted the first Chinese-American to play in the NFL.

(Laughter.)

But we also celebrate those Chinese-Americans whose names are not well known to us. And thousands have sent photographs and testimonials documenting the Chinese experience in the United States. And it represents a true pageant of American life.

I.M. Pei, the great architect who built the John F. Kennedy library in Boston, along with many other notable buildings, said that he hoped people who went to the Kennedy Library experienced “revived hope and promise for the future.” And I believe all of us can see that hope and promise here, in Shanghai.

And we have already been entertained by some of the young people who represent the future. I want to thank the Shanghai Music Conservatory string quartet that played for us during the reception. We are going to be hearing from the Parker Ossel Folish (ph) Trio, who will be playing during dinner. These are three young Americans who make their home here, in Shanghai. And then, after dinner, we will be entertained by an extraordinary group of young talent from California State University Northridge and Shanghai Normal University, who have joined forces to present a singing tribute called “Meet Me at the Expo.”

Thank you again to everyone who helped to make this evening and this pavilion possible. You have enabled me to sleep through the night once again. Thank you all very much.

(Applause.)

MR. VILLARREAL: Thank you, Madam Secretary. And now, on behalf of our many sponsors, I would like to introduce PepsiCo chief executive officer, Indra Nooyi, for a special presentation.

(Applause.)

MS. NOOYI: Madam Secretary, Mr. Commissioner General, your excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, it gives me great pleasure to present a gift to the USA Pavilion and the Chinese people, as a gesture of support for the Shanghai World Expo, and a gesture of friendship and respect for the people of China.

These panda sculptures are replicas of the (inaudible) peace and harmony, the beautiful and striking icons of the Shanghai Expo. They have been created by the world-famous Chinese artist, Zhang Wan (ph), who is, of course, the creator of the original panda sculpture which greets all Expo guests near the Chinese pavilion. These two smaller panda sculptures will remain here at the USA Pavilion, so as to welcome the Chinese people and all those who come through the doors of the USA Pavilion.

Madam Secretary, it is in this spirit of peace and harmony, and with great friendship and respect, that we present this gift to the USA Pavilion and the Chinese people. Thank you.

(Applause.)

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Well, of course she did a meet and greet, and of course my favorite pictures are with the kids. The SOS is so pretty and cute, that she often looks like a kid, herself.

Meet and Greet with Consulate Shanghai Employees

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Pudong Shangri La
Shanghai, China
May 22, 2010

SECRETARY CLINTON: Good morning, good morning.

(Applause.)

CONSUL GENERAL CAMP: Good morning, you’re looking great, and I want to thank you for all your efforts, all your support. Together, we have really achieved a lot in the recent days and weeks and months.

And I see all the kids up here, and I think about Take Your Child to Work Day last month. And those of you who were there got sworn in as officers of the day. And you know, when I got dressed this morning, I found in my pocket the notes I had. You promised to learn all you can about your own country and the country where you’re living, and to be a good representative of the United States of America. And I know you’re doing that.

And I first want to introduce Ambassador Huntsman, who I think is another example of that. So, Ambassador Huntsman will introduce our Secretary of State.

(Applause.)

AMBASSADOR HUNTSMAN: You hardly need the ambassador to stand between a great consul general and a terrific Secretary of State. But I will point out to Secretary Clinton that there is one of our young consular family members with a tee shirt that says, “Future Secretary of State” — got to make special note of that one. There we go.

(Applause.)

AMBASSADOR HUNTSMAN: That’s right, yes. Let me just say that the bottom line is, in standing here with the person who could be the most respected person on the world stage — she’s not just our Secretary of State, she’s probably the most respected person on the world stage, when you get right down to it — but if you want to know, really, what the Chinese people feel about the United States, all you have to do is ride on the bus with Secretary Clinton, and watch row after row of people, when they take a look at that bus and they, all of a sudden, discover who is in there. And to see the Secretary come in contact with the people of China, to see them light up, and to see their respect and admiration for the United States of America, but also for our Secretary of State, it warms your heart.

So, Secretary Clinton, this is a phenomenal consulate family, the hardest-working consulate in the world, I am guessing. But I am also probably willing to say that this is the most exciting place in the entire world to serve in the United States Government.

So, ladies and gentlemen, I give you your Secretary of State, and perhaps the most respected person on the world stage today, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

(Applause.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: Oh, thank you. And it’s so wonderful to see all of you this morning. And I want to thank Ambassador Huntsman. He has done such a wonderful job for us here, in China, and has been such an active, involved ambassador in every aspect of the mission, and improving relations between our two countries. And I thank you so much for that, John.

And I want to thank your consul general. Consul General Camp has just exhibited extraordinary leadership. And we are very grateful for everything that she has done every day, but particularly for the intense involvement in the preparations for the Shanghai Expo. It is exciting to see the response to our pavilion, and to just get a sense of how important this people-to-people contact is. And I thank you for understanding that, Bea, and doing such a great job.

You know, virtually every major challenge that we face in the world requires China and the United States to work together. I mean, that’s not a surprise to you. You see it every day, you facilitate it. All of you are on the front lines of this critical relationship. So I thank you for all of that work, and all of that outreach. It really does matter. And in the next six months I anticipate that the workload of this consulate is going to increase dramatically. I think I see a lot of nodding heads.

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: And that’s because there is going to be a lot of Americans who are going to want to come here and experience this Expo. And that will give us an opportunity to have more outreach to our Chinese visitors, to showcase our values, and also to have more interaction between Americans and the Chinese.

I want to thank Tom Cooney, and his public affairs team, and everyone else involved in making the most of this unique public diplomacy opportunity. And I know that the demands on your day jobs have not decreased, just because you have the added responsibilities. And I understand that you have hosted three cabinet-level visitors, a team from our inspector general’s office, and many other Expo-related visitors, all in a single month. So I want to thank the entire management, general services, and facilities management teams.

Now, I am well aware of the tradition called the wheels up party. And some of you who have served elsewhere in the world know this tradition. And I am often the excuse for a wheels up party. Well, I think you should all have a big pavilion down party when all of this is over, because you have been instrumental in making this happen.

You know, I leave later this afternoon for Beijing, to participate in the second strategic and economic dialogue, along with Secretary Geithner, and a very large delegation from our government. We are going to cover a wide range of issues. But one of our priorities is to encourage a more balanced economic relationship between the United States and China. And this is something you work on every single day. We are very grateful for your efforts on behalf of American companies and American farmers in increasing exports and jobs back home.

I want to applaud the consular section for your support of the tens of thousands of long-term American residents in the region, and the flood of visitors from the U.S. every month. You dealt with a 30 percent increase, a year-on-year increase in visa applications from Chinese citizens interested in coming to the United States. And I know this poses some challenges to you. And we have got to get your consular section more space. And we are working to overcome some bandwidth constraints. So, thank you for doing such a great job under some difficult circumstances, while we try to make some adjustments.

Now, I know how hard every member of this mission works. And I wish I could thank each and every one of you by name. But I just wanted personally to express our gratitude for your service to our country and to this important relationship. Now, before I leave, I want to greet as many of you as possible, and I particularly want to take a picture with all of the children, who look so nice, and are being so patient while we do this. And so, while I maybe say hello to some of the grown-ups, maybe we could get the children in an organized scrum in order to take a picture with them, as a memento.

But again, thank you all for everything you are doing. I am really proud of you.

(Applause.)

# # #

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Here are some photos of Madame Secretary visiting the U.S. and Chinese Pavilions at the Shanghai Expo.


Well guarded by China and her own State Department security. We are thankful for that.


This is some kind of X-Ray simulator. I guess she is X-Raing her hand. So many layers! Is it that chilly in Shanghai? Pretty raincoat.


It rained when she went to Shanghai in November to dedicate the U.S. Pavilion site. Looks like it is raining again!




At the Chinese Pavilion she signed the guest book, fist bumped the matching mascots, shook hands with the Chinese guides, and just generally decorated the place with her pretty presence.



OMG!  I just found these and they are too adorable not to share.  Here is Hillary with the mascots “Haibao.”  Cuteness abounds!  The second picture is also with the mayor of Shanghai Han Zheng.

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Meet and Greet with USA Pavilion Student Ambassadors and Employees

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
USA Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo
Shanghai, China
May 22, 2010

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, all of your ears should be burning, because you have made such a positive impression. And I hear it everywhere, not just from Jose. I hear it from other people, as well. And I think you have really made our people-to-people connections very much a part of what our experience is trying to be, because that’s our whole goal, you know. It is to create lasting connections and understanding between American and Chinese people. And you all represent that.

So, I want you, very quickly, starting right there, to introduce yourself and tell me where you’re from.

PARTICIPANT: I am Deenie, I am from New York.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Yay!

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: Little editorial comment.

(Laughter.)

PARTICIPANT: Imena, from South Carolina.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Great.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible.)

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible.)

PARTICIPANT: Lydia, from Colorado.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Jacqueline, from Massachusetts.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Amy, from California.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Vri, from Buffalo, New York.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Buffalo, New York.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Nina.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Zhing, from California.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Allison, from Pennsylvania.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Ashley, from Long Island, New York.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Bethany, born in Shanghai, now in California.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Ally, I’m from Connecticut.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Lindley, I’m in California.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Caleb, I’m from Detroit, Michigan.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Cathy, I’m from Houston, Texas.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Hannah, I’m from Chicago.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Joy, I’m from Houston, Texas.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Rebecca. I’m from D.C.

PARTICIPANT: And my name is Evan, and I’m from Falls Church, Virginia.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Terrific.

PARTICIPANT: Mark, from Memphis, Tennessee.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Okay.

PARTICIPANT: Sonia, from Hawaii.

PARTICIPANT: Sebastian LaBar, Dallas, Texas.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible) Pennsylvania.

PARTICIPANT: Trenton Gabe, from California.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible) from Dallas, Texas.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible.)

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: A chorus.

PARTICIPANT: David Wong, from Idaho.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Benjamin, Washington State.

PARTICIPANT: Tyler, from Park City, Utah.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible), Los Angeles, California.

PARTICIPANT: Ryan, from New York.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Great.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible.)

PARTICIPANT: Charles (inaudible).

PARTICIPANT: Taylor, from Salt Lake City.

PARTICIPANT: I’m Janson, from Tulsa, Oklahoma.

PARTICIPANT: Jessica, from Los Angeles, California.

PARTICIPANT: Emily, from Los Angeles, California.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible) from Los Angeles.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible) from Austin, Texas.

PARTICIPANT: Christina from (inaudible).

PARTICIPANT: Katie, from the Scranton area, and (inaudible).

SECRETARY CLINTON: I heard you say that before —

(Laughter.)

PARTICIPANT: Fisher, from (inaudible).

SECRETARY CLINTON: Okay.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible) from Pennsylvania, and now New Haven.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible.)

PARTICIPANT: Liberty, from Florida.

PARTICIPANT: Quincy, from Connecticut.

PARTICIPANT: Christina, from San Francisco.

PARTICIPANT: Patricia, from San Francisco.

PARTICIPANT: Sofie, from Minnesota.

PARTICIPANT: Donna, from Boston.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible) from Utah.

PARTICIPANT: Katie, from Alabama.

PARTICIPANT: Mica from Utah.

PARTICIPANT: Edward, born and raised in Kansas.

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: I heard that this morning, too.

(Laughter.)

PARTICIPANT: Pam, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

PARTICIPANT: Lavinia, from Chicago.

PARTICIPANT: Heather, from South Carolina.

PARTICIPANT: Sarah Kate, from Wellesley, Massachusetts.

PARTICIPANT: (Inaudible.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: Great. What a great cross-section.

Now, let me ask you this. How many of you come from families where Mandarin or another Chinese dialect was spoken? So that’s a pretty good number.

And how many of you just started from scratch, because you were interested in learning the language? Oh, that’s very impressive. Lots of challenging days and nights, I think.

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: And now, how many of you are finished with college? You’re done? You’re done? Okay. And then how many of you are still in college, waiting?

I just can’t thank you enough for your willingness to do this, because it’s been just an incredible addition to our pavilion and our presence here at the Expo.

How did you decide to do this? Anybody?

PARTICIPANT: My grandmother.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Your grandmother?

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: Did your grandmother hear about it? Good.

PARTICIPANT: I’ve been in China — this is my third time here. And I lived in Shanghai last summer (inaudible) that the U.S. and China (inaudible) —

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, you are exactly on the right note on that. What about other people?

PARTICIPANT: After Olympics — I volunteered for Olympics.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Did you?

PARTICIPANT: For the 2008 ones. I had such a good time, I knew I had to come here.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Good. Now, you’re all living in a kind of Expo village, right?

PARTICIPANTS: Right.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Is that working out?

PARTICIPANTS: Oh, yes. Very nice.

MR. VILLARREAL: That’s not what you told me.

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, yes, that’s all right. All complaints go to him. Only positive reinforcement comes to me.

Well, do you have any questions? Do you have anything you want to ask me about?

PARTICIPANT: I really appreciate —

PARTICIPANT: How did you find the pavilion today?

SECRETARY CLINTON: You know what? I liked it. I liked it. And, believe me, I was so relieved, because it was not clear at all, when I became Secretary, that we would have a pavilion. And I thought that would not be a good representation of our country at this important time in history at this event.

You know, expositions are historical markers. I mean, we had expositions in St. Louis — you know that old song, which I’m sure some of you sing, “Meet Me in St. Louis?” Then Chicago had a great exposition. New York had a world’s fair. And it — you know, there are too many of them around the world to be present in all of them. But there are important ones, historically. And this is an important one. And I wanted the United States to be here.

So, when I was here in November, it was really a touch-and-go situation. They had — I guess they had some of the outer steel up, right, Jose? And so that was mid to late November. And we were wondering whether we were going to make it. And I kept telling people, “I will have to put it up myself, if you don’t get it up.”

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: So I was very pleased. I was excited. And when I went to the Chinese pavilion, many, many compliments about our pavilion, about how popular it is. I think Jose and the team told me that there were 40,000 people here yesterday. That’s exhausting.

(Laughter.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: And you have to be smiling and nice and bilingual the whole time. That’s very — a very great accomplishment on your part. But people — you know, people seem to be responding. And that makes me happy, because we want as many people to come as possible, and we want them to get, you know, some feel of who we are, as a people, for the future, for that relationship that, you know, you were talking about.

Well, enjoy the rest of your time here.

PARTICIPANTS: Thank you.

(Applause.)

SECRETARY CLINTON: Wow, you are truly a sight for sore eyes. I can’t thank you enough. I mean, things are really off to a good start, and would not be possible without all of your extraordinary dedication to making things happen.

We had a few death-defying moments, in terms of whether we would get the pavilion built, and get it ready. But all finally worked out. And I am so grateful. So let me thank you, thank you for making this a priority, and understanding the importance of the China-U.S. relationship, and how we are trying to build connections between the American and Chinese people. And I think — have we hit 700,000? Did we hit 700,000?

MR. VILLARREAL: Mark?

PARTICIPANT: Last night.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Last night we hit 700,000. So, you know, that is about as good a beginning as one can imagine. And it’s part of what we call public diplomacy. And every one of you is a public diplomat. So I thank you so much.

PARTICIPANTS: Thank you.

(Applause.)

# # #

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Remarks At USA Pavilion Gala Dinner

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
U.S. Pavilion at Shanghai Expo
Shanghai, China
May 22, 2010

MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, good evening. Please give a warm welcome to the commissioner general of the USA Pavilion, Jose Villarreal.

(Applause.)

MR. VILLARREAL: Where is Lavinia? Oh, there you are. Ni hao. Welcome to the USA Pavilion.

One of the things that I am most proud of is the role being served by our student ambassadors. Two weeks ago they helped me welcome President Hu Jintao to our pavilion. And tonight, representing all student ambassadors, is Lavinia Pement of Chicago, who will be translating for me.

(Applause.)

This is obviously a very exciting day, as we celebrate U.S. participation at the Shanghai World Expo. It is a day that some doubted would ever come. But in the true spirit of our pavilion theme of rising to the challenge, we triumphed, and we are here today.

(Applause.)

It is especially exciting, because all of the key participants are here with us, including our financial sponsors, our government officials, the USA Pavilion board of directors, the Shanghai ex-pat community, and our Chinese Expo partners, who have worked with us, hand in hand.

I would like to acknowledge Ambassador Jon Huntsman and Consul General Bea Camp for their continuous support and guidance.

(Applause.)

Let me also say to our Chinese Expo friends that you have made me, our student ambassadors, and our entire USA Pavilion staff feel totally at home in Shanghai. And for that we are profoundly grateful.

Tonight we are privileged to be joined by the person who brought us all here today, and the person most responsible for U.S. participation at the Shanghai World Expo. Ladies and gentlemen, please help me welcome U.S. Secretary of State, the Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton.

(Applause.)

MR. VILLARREAL: Thank you for giving me this opportunity.

SECRETARY CLINTON: You have done so well with it. Thank you, and good evening. And welcome to the USA Pavilion, here at Shanghai Expo. I want to thank Jose for that introduction, but I want to thank him more for his leadership as Commissioner General. When I asked Jose to take on this important responsibility, he knew that we had not built the pavilion, he knew that we had not raised all the money for the pavilion. And I told him, “Well, Jose, you and I will have to go and build it, and then entertain people.”

(Laughter.)

And I am very pleased to note that, in recognition of the importance of the Shanghai World Expo to advancing U.S.-China relations, President Obama has accorded Jose the personal rank of Ambassador.

(Applause.)

So we will now, I guess, call you Ambassador Commissioner General.

(Laughter.)

Establishing an American presence at this Expo worthy of our great country was quite a journey.

There is a poem from the Southern Song Dynasty that reads: “After endless mountains and rivers that leave doubt whether there is a path out, suddenly one encounters the shade of a willow, bright flowers and a lovely village.” Well, I am very pleased that we have finally arrived at our lovely village.

(Applause.)

This was a real team effort, a partnership that brought together our government, the private sector, the Chinese-American community, and so many friends and supporters. So, let me offer a few thank-yous.

To Ambassador Jon Huntsman and Consul General Bea Camp, and all the men and women of the U.S. Mission in China, we thank you.

(Applause.)

To Ken Jarett and the board, staff, and volunteers of the USA Pavilion, including our student ambassadors who represent not just the welcoming spirit of our Pavilion, but the openness of our country. And to Ambassador Elizabeth Bagley and her deputy, Kris Balderston, and our corporate partners — your generosity and commitment has made all of this possible. And I am very grateful to each and every one of you.

(Applause.)

And finally, I want to express our deep appreciation to our Chinese hosts. It is a great honor to have with us Ambassador Zhang, Vice Foreign Minister Cui, Vice Finance Minister Li, and Vice Mayor Tang here with us this evening. Earlier today I had the privilege of visiting the China Pavilion, with its sweeping panorama of a great nation. The ancient Riverside scroll, which depicts another period of dramatic change and development, has been transformed through the magic of technology into a vivid symbol of the new China. This entire Expo, the largest in history, is a testament to the hospitality and energy of the Chinese people. And all around us we see that the glory of the past is matched by the dynamism of the present and the promise of the future.

The shape of that future depends, to a significant degree, on the evolving relationship between the United States and China. If our relations are defined by win-win solutions rather than zero-sum rivalries, we will thrive and prosper together. Now, we may not always agree on every issue, but we should seek and seize opportunities such as this Expo to build greater understanding between our peoples.

This USA Pavilion embodies many of the qualities that make my country a vibrant and prosperous nation: innovation, sustainability, diversity, the free exchange of ideas. And it is a model of environmental responsibility. And I am proud to announce that the Pavilion will be carbon neutral for the entire duration of the Expo.

700,000 people have already visited this pavilion. And one of the most moving displays is the tribute to the millions of Chinese Americans who have contributed so much to the cultural and economic development of the United States. From Yo-Yo Ma to I.M. Pei to Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and Energy Secretary Chu, Chinese-Americans have achieved great success in business, government, the arts, sciences and sports. And, to that end, I was pleased to hear that the Buffalo Bills have recently drafted the first Chinese-American to play in the NFL.

(Laughter.)

But we also celebrate those Chinese-Americans whose names are not well known to us. And thousands have sent photographs and testimonials documenting the Chinese experience in the United States. And it represents a true pageant of American life.

I.M. Pei, the great architect who built the John F. Kennedy library in Boston, along with many other notable buildings, said that he hoped people who went to the Kennedy Library experienced “revived hope and promise for the future.” And I believe all of us can see that hope and promise here, in Shanghai.

And we have already been entertained by some of the young people who represent the future. I want to thank the Shanghai Music Conservatory string quartet that played for us during the reception. We are going to be hearing from the Parker Ossel Folish (ph) Trio, who will be playing during dinner. These are three young Americans who make their home here, in Shanghai. And then, after dinner, we will be entertained by an extraordinary group of young talent from California State University Northridge and Shanghai Normal University, who have joined forces to present a singing tribute called “Meet Me at the Expo.”

Thank you again to everyone who helped to make this evening and this pavilion possible. You have enabled me to sleep through the night once again. Thank you all very much.

(Applause.)

MR. VILLARREAL: Thank you, Madam Secretary. And now, on behalf of our many sponsors, I would like to introduce PepsiCo chief executive officer, Indra Nooyi, for a special presentation.

(Applause.)

MS. NOOYI: Madam Secretary, Mr. Commissioner General, your excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, it gives me great pleasure to present a gift to the USA Pavilion and the Chinese people, as a gesture of support for the Shanghai World Expo, and a gesture of friendship and respect for the people of China.

These panda sculptures are replicas of the (inaudible) peace and harmony, the beautiful and striking icons of the Shanghai Expo. They have been created by the world-famous Chinese artist, Zhang Wan (ph), who is, of course, the creator of the original panda sculpture which greets all Expo guests near the Chinese pavilion. These two smaller panda sculptures will remain here at the USA Pavilion, so as to welcome the Chinese people and all those who come through the doors of the USA Pavilion.

Madam Secretary, it is in this spirit of peace and harmony, and with great friendship and respect, that we present this gift to the USA Pavilion and the Chinese people. Thank you.

(Applause.)

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Long days, long nights, and the intrepid Secretary of State just keeps going like a lovely little energizer bunny.   Here we see her plane on the tarmac amid obvious anticipation and excitement at Pudong International Airport in Shanghai.  She is greeted by Ambassador Jon Huntsman and Shanghai Consul General Beatrice Camp.  But not before accommodating a fan who wants a picture, so she strikes a pretty pose.



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These two trips were packed together with only two days home in between. Just posting about them was pretty intense, and the dazzling SOS came through the whole thing glowing as usual. Here’s a look back at almost a month of diplomatic travel.

Afghanistan 11/18-11/19

Beijing 11/17

Shanghai 11/16

Singapore APEC 11/14-11/15

Phlippines 11/12-11/13

Singapore APEC 11/11

Berlin 11/8-11/10


Morocco 11/1-11/3

Israel 10/31

Abu Dhabi 10/30

Pakistan 10/27-10/29

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