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Posts Tagged ‘U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue’

The most crucial thing on Hillary’s agenda for May 2, 2012 was not reflected on her public schedule as released by the State Department. Nor was her first stop at the Wanhousi Temple.

Hillary Clinton

 

SECRETARY HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON: Public Schedule for May 2, 2012

A self-taught lawyer, activist, and hero of the people had, with her approval and instructions, been provided refuge at our Embassy Beijing, and blind and injured, stood to disrupt all negotiations at that year’s U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue.

Having made his way to the embassy despite his disability and the physical injuries incurred on his journey to Beijing, Chen Guangcheng had captured media attention and a great deal of American sympathy and Chinese faith.  While Hillary believed and acted strongly from her heart that we needed to move on his behalf, his figure, in a few venues – our embassy and a Chinese hospital –  threatened to hang between two great nations that were still performing a middle school fox trot.

In this chapter, Hillary recounts how she first hears of Chen’s plight prior to leaving for the very important U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue, and made an executive decision to accept him at the embassy (and rescue him in order to do so).

There were a several bumps in that road.  Hillary managed to pave them.

Was there ever any doubt?

Hillary Rodham Clinton, Dai Bingguo

Hillary Clinton’s Statement on Chen Guangcheng

May 2, 2012 by still4hill |

Secretary Clinton at Opening of U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue **Video Added**

Hillary Clinton at EcoPartnerships Ceremony

Chen Guangcheng: State Department Update

Video: Hillary Clinton – Timothy Geithner Press Conference in Beijing

Video: Secretary Clinton on U.S.-China Relations in the 21st Century

Hillary ends this chapter with some comments that, on first reading, appear meant to explain China and its way of thinking to the American reader.  When I read it again, I thought it just as likely that she also embedded a message there for the Chinese by expressing that rather than wishing to contain China (the Chinese fear) the U.S. seeks cooperation with China for the common good.

As we know, Hard Choices has been effectively banned in China, but we hope that embedded message manages to get through the Great Firewall.

Hillary Clinton’s ‘Hard Choices’ Effectively Banned in China

In the Wake of the Chinese Ban Simon & Schuster Share a Hillary Clinton Excerpt on China

Hillary Clinton’s ‘Hard Choices’ Retrospective: Introduction

Access other chapters of this retrospective here >>>>

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Hillary introduces this chapter with a good deal of background from her previous visits to China and the influence they had on her first visit there as secretary of state.  She speaks of reunions with old friends that were not public and therefore not covered by press or the State Department.

It is clear that this maiden voyage in her new capacity was freighted, and she explains both her priorities and the degree to which some (political, environmental,  and commercial issues) were given publicity and others (human rights issues) were not but emphasizes that human rights did not take a back seat.

345,http _d.yimg.com_a_p_afp_20090220_capt.photo_1235152771440-1-0

She mentions discussing religious freedom and the related issues of Tibet and Taiwan in meetings with high officials but does not remind us that she took the trouble to attend church services.  We at the now-defunct Hillary’s Village Forum knew and shared that information, but I never blogged it here.

2009_0224_clinton_wen_meeti_m U.S. Secretary of State Clinton listens to clergy as she walks out after Sunday service in Beijing

She also participated in an online chat and a TV interview on this visit, although she does not specifically mention them.  Part of her outreach to civil society to be sure.

Hillary Clinton’s Online Chat in China

Hillary Clinton’s Dragon TV Interview in China

The highest profile meeting detailed by the State Department at the time was her bilateral with then Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi.

Hillary Clinton with Chinese FM Yang Jiechi

It was during this meeting that she became aware of the upcoming Shanghai Expo about which it appeared no one in the U.S. was doing anything.  So Hillary shouldered the responsibility to get a U.S. pavilion up and running in time for the opening in May 2010.

 

 

Video: Secretary Clinton Meeting With Student Ambassadors At The Shanghai Expo

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks At USA Pavilion Gala Dinner

Secretary Clinton Meets and Greets USA Pavilion Student Ambassadors and Employees

Photos: Hillary Clinton at the Shanghai Expo

The most important item on her agenda with China was formulating a way to navigate through the ‘uncharted waters’ of the U.S.-China relationship.   She and other cabinet officials, specifically Timothy Geithner  being a high-profile proponent, were determined to initiate a U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue realized in May 2010.

05-24-10-34U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton looks at China's President Hu Jintao during the opening ceremony of the China-U.S. Strategic and Economic Dialogue in BeijingChinese Vice-Premier Wang Qishan (3rd R)

Secretary Clinton’s Address at the Strategic and Economic Dialogue Opening Session

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at the Strategic and Economic Dialogue Opening Session

Among all of the issues involving Asia, the most enormous elephant in the room swinging its massive trunk on the sidelines of every official meeting was the issue of ‘dominion,’ if it can be called that, over the waters of the South and East China Seas.   These waters are vital to shipping routes, but also flow over precious mineral resources such as semi-conductors that are indispensable in the hardware that organizes our online lives now from communications through paperless bill-paying.  The Chinese made it clear that their claims to these waters were non-negotiable.  Hillary thought that if enough of China’s smaller neighbors were to coalesce around the issue of access the giant might blink.

She cites the July 2010 ASEAN Ministerial Meetings in Hanoi as the tipping point at which a coalition of south Asian countries became strong  enough to press giant China on these seafaring issues.*  Her instincts and predictions on this were spot-on.

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at the ASEAN-U.S. Ministerial Meeting

Slideshow: Hillary Clinton ASEAN Hanoi Day Two

She closes out this Asia chapter with her return from the Hanoi ASEAN with only a week left to finalize preparations for Chelsea’s wedding.

MOTB Hillary Clinton in New York

Slideshow: Hillary and Bill @ Beekman Arms

Here Comes the Bride!

And so ends chapter 4 with a lot of hope for the future.

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Endnote

*I still contend that if the Senate, at any point, had ratified the Law of the Sea Treaty (LOST – see the sidebar on the right) her job from here through her last Asia trip in 2012 would not have been so demanding.  The island-hopping and bilaterals and trilaterals that took place in summer of 2012 might not have been so intense and crucial.  You might remember her being given access that was not easy to come by to watch WJC address the Democratic National Convention in September of that year.  All of that traveling among those islands was over maritime rights in the South and East China Seas.  A LOST ratification might have obviated much of that shuttle diplomacy.  But that’s just me.  Just sayin’.  Anyway, it’s water under all the bridges.

How the Tea Party Harpooned Hillary Clinton’s Asia Mission

 

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Hillary Clinton’s ‘Hard Choices’ Retrospective: Introduction

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Remarks at EcoPartnerships Ceremony

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Diaoyutai Club House
Beijing, China
May 3, 2012

Thank you very much. It is an honor for me to be here. And Vice Chairman, thank you as always for your leadership and support of the efforts that we are launching today.

I just came from an exhibit of cookstoves that are manufactured and used here in China. And that illustrates how we can work together to meet the challenges we face – sometimes in very big ways like working on agreements, but sometimes in smaller, equally significant ways like working through the Global Alliance on Cookstoves that China has just joined.

It also means working not only at our national government level but also with state and local governments, the private sector, and civil society. Last January, together we created the U.S.-China Sub-National Initiative. It has already sparked dozens of joint efforts between states in China and the United States on issues ranging from trade and investment to job creation. Some of our most successful partnerships are working to answer a question that is very important to both of our countries, and it is this: How can we meet our shared need for affordable energy while also preserving our environment?

We already have 13 EcoPartnerships, and today we are launching five more. One will connect experts on two of our nation’s most precious resources, the Yangtze and Mississippi Rivers. They will exchange ideas about restoring ecosystems. Two other partnerships will pair researchers working to develop electric cars. Two more will help development environmentally friendly cities and create exchange programs for local officials who work on environmental issues.

So if you combine the good news that Councilor Dai gave me that China is joining the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves with the EcoPartnerships, I think once again our cooperation is really paying dividends for the people of both our countries and the world. This illustrates once again that the United States and China can and will work together in new ways and through many channels to address our common challenges on energy and the environment, two issues that transcend politics that we live with every single day in our homes, our businesses, and our communities.

So congratulations to all the members of our new partnerships, and thank you for doing work that will benefit the generations to come and strengthen the relationship between the American and Chinese people.

Now I’m told we’re going to take a picture, which is even the best part. (Applause.)

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U.S.-China SED Opener, posted with vodpod

Remarks at U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue Opening Session

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Diaoyutai Villa 17
Beijing, China
May 3, 2012

(In progress) – Strategic and Economic Dialogue, and I know that both Secretary Geithner and I greatly appreciate all the work done by both of our delegations and the months of preparation for this meeting. I’ve read readings from President Obama and a letter from him expressing how important the Strategic and Economic Dialogue is to the U.S.-China relationship and how important this relationship is to the United States.

As President Obama says, the United States remains committed to building a cooperative partnership based on mutual benefit and mutual respect. Since we launched this dialogue three years ago, high-ranking officials from both our governments have criss-crossed the Pacific dozens of times. Our relationship has grown closer and more consequential, and the web of connections that link our nations is increasing.

As a result, this dialogue is even more necessary today than it was when it began, and the eyes of the world are once again upon us. The Chinese people and the American people looking for us to work together for their benefit, and the international community looking to us to work together for the world’s benefit; in today’s world, no global player can afford to treat geopolitics as a zero-sum game, so we are working to build a relationship that allows both of our countries to flourish without unhealthy competition or conflict, while at the same time meeting our responsibilities to our people and to the international community.

We both know that we have to get this right because so much depends upon it. We also both know that our countries have become thoroughly, inescapably interdependent. As President Obama and I have said many times, the United States believes that a thriving China is good for America, and a thriving America is good for China. So we have a strong interest in China’s continued economic growth and if China’s rising capabilities means that we have an increasingly able and engaged partner in solving the threats we face to both regional and global security, that is all good.

Now, having said that, we understand too that building a cooperative, resilient, mutually beneficial relationship is not easy. That’s why this dialogue is so critical as well as the Strategic Security Dialogue that took place here yesterday. We are discussing how the talks are opening economic activity to advance prosperity, support innovation, and improve the lives of people, how to promote greater military transparency to avoid misunderstandings, to build trust and maintain mutual stability, how to tackle some of the world’s most urgent crises from climate change to proliferation.

The United States welcomes China’s increased engagement on the highest priority regional and global issues, and in our strategic track, we will be discussing these. For example, on Iran, the United States and China share the goal of preventing Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. And we had a productive first meeting as members of the P-5+1 in Istanbul, and are looking forward to the next meeting in Baghdad because we both understand it is critical to keep pressure on Iran to meet its international obligations, to negotiate seriously, and prove that its nuclear program is solely for peaceful purposes.

In Syria, we are absolutely committed to end the brutal violence against civilians, and therefore, it is essential that the international community work together to hold the regime and the others involved in violence accountable, because regrettably, the Security Council on which we both serve as current members is at stake.

Regarding North Korea, the missile launch seems to suggest that Pyongyang actually used improved relations with the outside world not a goal, but as a threat. And we recognize the role that China is playing and are continuing to work together to make it clear to North Korea that strength and security will come from prioritizing the needs of its people, not from further provocation.

In Sudan and South Sudan, China and the United States are working together. In fact, with me today is the U.S. special envoy to Sudan who is in regular contact with the Chinese special representative for Africa. And I’m pleased that China and the United States joined with a unified international community just hours ago to support a strong UN security resolution that provides unambiguous support for the African Union roadmap.

Our countries are addressing everything from cyber security to the changes and reforms going on in Burma to piracy and so much else, because we know that we are working to better the lives of our people and a better future for all humanity. Now of course, as part of our dialogue, the United States raises the importance of human rights and fundamental freedoms because we believe that all governments do have to answer to citizens’ aspirations for dignity and the rule of law, and that no nation can or should deny those rights.

As President Obama said this week, a China that protects the rights of all its citizens will be a stronger and more prosperous nation, and of course, a stronger partner on behalf of our common goals. The conversations we have here in Beijing reflect how much the U.S.-China relationship has grown in the 40 years since President Nixon came to China. Then, we had hardly any ties to speak of; now, we work together. I think it’s fair to say China and the United States cannot solve all the problems of the world, but without our cooperation, it is doubtful any problem can be solved. And so we are working as we go forward with our dialogue, seeking opportunities for engagement, building ties that are not only between governments but family, friends, entrepreneurs, students, scholars, artists, and so much else.

Tomorrow, I will attend the annual meeting of U.S.-China Consultation on People-to-People Exchanges, and we will discuss the progress we’re making, including for our 100000 Strong Education Initiative that will increase significantly the numbers and diversity of American students studying in China.

So I wish to thank our hosts for their gracious hospitality once again, and pledge that we will continue to work together in a true spirit of partnership and mutual respect for the mutual benefit of our two nations. Thank you very much. (Applause.)

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Concluding Joint Statements at the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue

Great Hall of the People
Beijing, China
May 25, 2010

MODERATOR: (Via translator) I now invite Special Representative of President Hu Jintao, Vice-Premier Wang Qishan to speak.
VICE-PREMIER WANG: (Via translator) Friends from the press, under the guidance of President Hu Jintao and President Obama, with the considered (inaudible) of both sides, the second round of China-U.S. S&ED have achieved complete success. This round fully illustrates the nature as being overriding, strategic, and long-term, and the principle of not replacing, not repeating, and not weakening exist dialogue mechanism between the related sectors of China and the United States. It has been candid, pragmatic, and successful.
China and the United States are respectively the largest developing country and developed country in the world. Our economic relationships (inaudible) and has had a global impact. Under the current extremely complicated circumstances, the two sides have had in-depth discussions, and expanded common ground on issues to each other’s concerns, (inaudible) world economic situation, transform economic growth pattern, strengthen economic and financial cooperation, and reforming global economic governance (inaudible). Discussions, as such, are of a great importance to (inaudible) the upturn in our two economies and promoting strong, sustainable, and balanced growth of the world economy.
In fact, our two sides sitting together, having in-depth communications, candid exchanges, and rational discussions on our common interests and differences existing between us, this in itself is the most significant outcome of this round. As our economic relationship gets increasingly close, we are now able to take into full consideration our differences in history, culture, national conditions, development stage, economic structure, and market sophistication. We are now able to manage our differences and problems arising in the course of growing economic relationship with a more rational and mature manner. While upholding to our respective principles, we have better understood our positions, built a consensus (inaudible) cooperation, and achieved win-win.
Friends from press, I hope, through you, to make known to the world our firm confidence in working together to address challenges and promote the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive China-U.S. relationship (inaudible). Thank you.
MODERATOR: (Via translator) Thank you, Vice-Premier Wang. Now I would like to hand over the microphone to State Councilor Dai Bingguo.
STATE COUNCILOR DAI: (Via translator) Dear friends from the press, friends, good afternoon. With the personal care of President Hu Jintao and President Obama, and through the joint efforts of the two sides, the second round of the China-U.S. strategic and economic dialogues came to a successful conclusion.
Just now, President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao met. Secretary Clinton, Secretary Geithner and other members, they had very rich and profound discussions. Our dialogues have taken two days. And, looking back, starting from 2005 we have had several rounds of strategic dialogues. And last year we had the first round of the strategic and economic dialogue. For the strategic dialogue we have had over 100 hours of dialogues. And this mechanism, I am afraid, is one of the most special mechanisms, if it is not the most unique mechanism in the world. And I think both sides need to make the best out of this mechanism, and continue to improve and safeguard this mechanism, and to serve the interest of building the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive relations.
And for this round of the dialogue I fully agree with Vice-Premier Wang Qishan’s positive comments on the dialogues. During this round, Secretary Clinton and I reviewed the achievements made in the previous strategic dialogues. We had in-depth and candid discussions and communications with a focus on advancing China-U.S. relations in the new era, respecting each other’s core interests and major concerns, strengthening coordination and major international regional issues, and jointly promoting transformation of the international system, and development of cooperation mechanisms in the Asia Pacific region.
Competent departments of the two countries held a consultation in bilateral meetings on issues including energy, security, climate change, and UN peacekeeping operations. We have signed a number of agreements, and the dialogues produced many results. Although we haven’t agreed on each and every of the major issues, the dialogues, I believe, are conducive to the further advancement of the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive relations in 21st century.
We both recognize that the world has entered a post-financial crisis era. The circumstances we’re in and the responsibilities on our shoulders decide that only by exchanging ideas closely we can expand our mutual trust. Only by advancing cooperation can we achieve and win results. And only by strengthening coordination we can meet the challenges. And only by helping each other out as passengers in this gigantic ship of China-U.S. relationship will (inaudible) forward, braving winds and waves.
We believe that the China-U.S. relationship is critical to both countries and the whole world. The two sides also believe that, to cultivate and deepen China-U.S. strategic mutual trust is important to the advancement of China-U.S. relationship in the new century.
The two sides emphasized that it is impossible for China and the United States to agree on all issues. And the two sides will have disagreements and differences. What is important is to observe the spirit and principles enshrined in the three Sino-U.S. communication, China-U.S. joint statement: respect and accommodate each other’s core interests and major concerns; properly handle all defensive and sensitive issues, including Taiwan and Tibet-related issues; and consolidate the basics of mutual trust. As long as we keep to this right direction, we will be able to remove disruptions and obstacles and further advance our relations. The two sides re-emphasize that we will respect each other’s core interests and major concerns. We will continue to properly handle the defensive and sensitive issues in the relations, according to the principle of mutual respect and equal discussions, so that our relations will steadily and soundly move forward.
The two sides stated that we will stay committed to increase the stability in the relationship. We agreed to advance communication, consultation, coordination, and cooperation on bilateral, regional, and global issues. During the dialogues, the two sides exchanged views on the current situation on the Korean Peninsula.
The two sides believe that ensuring peace and stability in northeast Asia and the Korean Peninsula is critical. And under current circumstances, relevant parties should proceed from the — safeguarding the overall interests of peace and stability in the region, calmly and appropriately handle the issue, and avoid escalation of the situation. In the dialogues we further discussed the building of the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive relationship in the 21st century. We believe that it is a relationship of — between cooperative partners, instead of between rivalries and enemies. It is the cooperation of peaceful coexistence, instead of being on guard against each other, or (inaudible) each other. It is a mutually beneficial win-win relationship, instead of one that is seeking one’s own benefits at the expense of the others. It is a relationship equal — equality, instead of yielding ­– one side yielding to the other side. It is a relationship in which we exchange ideas frankly, trust each other, and have a reasonable and objective perspective of each other’s strategic intentions, and respect each other’s core interests and major concerns. And it is a relationship out of a strong sense of responsibility to the two peoples, and the people of the rest of the world. It is not a relationship of alignment, or targeted against any third party.
Finally, I would like to sincerely thank Vice-Premier Wang, Secretary Clinton, and Secretary Geithner. I would like to thank all the members of both teams, and thank all those who care about and support the China-U.S. strategic and economic dialogue. Thank you.
(Applause.)
MODERATOR: (Via translator) (Inaudible) Councilor Dai. And now I would like to (inaudible) Secretary (inaudible).
SECRETARY CLINTON: Thank you very much. On behalf of all of the American delegation, I want to thank our generous hosts, Vice-Premier Wang and State Councilor Dai, for their excellent preparation and the extraordinary time that has been given to this dialogue, along with the Chinese team and the American team. This dialogue is the premier forum for one of the most important and complex relationships in the world. And the breadth and depth of our delegation continues to grow, because it reflects the agenda that we are working on together.
Earlier this year, our relationship faced uncertainty, and many questioned the direction we were heading. Now, in an earlier era, we might have experienced a lasting set-back. But this dialogue mechanism, and the habits of cooperation it has helped create, along with the confidence it has built, helped put us rapidly back on a positive track. This strategic and economic dialogue (inaudible), and it reflects the maturity, durability, and strength of our relationship. So, over the last days we discussed a wide range of the most complex bilateral, regional, and global challenges.
Now, as we have said many times, we do not agree on every issue. We don’t agree even sometimes on the perception of the issue. But that is partly what this dialogue is about. It is a place where we can discuss everything, as State Councilor Dai said, from Taiwan to universal human rights. And in the course of doing so, we are developing that positive, cooperative, and comprehensive understanding that leads to the relationship for the 21st century that both President Obama and President Hu Jintao put into motion when they agreed to do this dialogue.
The success of the U.S.-China relationship will ultimately be measured by the results we deliver to our people. Do our dialogues and our collaborations produce changes that people see in their daily lives, and that contribute to global progress or not? That is both our challenge and our responsibility.
So, this round of the dialogue did not solve all of our shared problems, but it did produce a number of concrete results, some of which you saw as Chinese and American officials came forward to sign memoranda of understanding.
One in particular is in our efforts to meet the challenges of climate change and clean energy. We signed an agreement that, for the first time, will allow American experts to work closely with Chinese colleagues to begin exploring China’s vast natural gas potential. We believe that could well lead to new economic opportunities in both countries, and a lower carbon emission load for our planet. This is part of the broader drive for energy security and greater market transparency and efficiency, closer cooperation, and more focus on cleaner energy (inaudible).
Earlier today I was pleased to sign with State Councilor Liu (inaudible) U.S.-China consultation on people-to-people exchange. President Obama has announced a goal of sending 100,000 American students to China in the next 4 years to learn Mandarin, to experience Chinese culture, and to learn about the hospitality of the Chinese people, while they serve as ambassadors for the United States in China. And toward this end, I want to thank State Councilor Liu for her announcement of 10,000 scholarships for American students.
Our U.S.-China relationship must extend beyond the halls of government to our homes, our businesses, and our schools. And these exchanges really offer the opportunity for people to connect and collaborate, and they remind us of how much we have in common.
As part of this dialogue, we also had our most serious high-level discussion to date on development, which is a core pillar of our foreign policy, along with diplomacy and defense. And we had very frank and detailed conversations about international security challenges and regional hot spots, including Iran and North Korea. We stressed the importance of reaching a conclusion on resolution of the United Nations Security Council to send a message to Iran to, “Live up to your international responsibilities or face growing isolation and consequences.”
Similarly, with respect to North Korea, the United States and China share the objective of peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula. Last year, we worked to pass and enforce a strong UN Security Council resolution in the wake of North Korea’s nuclear test. Now we must work together again to address the serious challenge provoked by the sinking of the South Korean ship.
We are looking forward to working with our friends in South Korea. We appreciated the very statesmanlike approach that President Lee is following, and the prudent measures that he announced in his speech. No one is more concerned about the peace and stability in this region than the Chinese. We know this is a shared responsibility. And in the days ahead, we will work with the international community and our Chinese colleagues to fashion an effective and appropriate response. The consultations between China and the United States have started here in Beijing. They continue very closely, and we expect to be working together to resolve this matter.
China and the United States are two great nations with a compelling interest in global stability and security. We have different histories, and are at different stages in our development. But we recognize that we share a responsibility for meeting the challenges of our time, from combating climate change to curbing nuclear proliferation and rebalancing the global economy. This dialogue is a mechanism to exercise that collective leadership and meet our collective responsibilities.
So, there is much that we have worked on and that we are accomplishing that can only happen when people come together and meet as we have. Yesterday, President Hu Jintao said in his opening remarks, “Not even the most sophisticated telecommunication technology can replace face-to-face exchanges.” Well, he is absolutely right. So I am very pleased that we had face-to-face exchanges, and we developed greater understanding and deepened our relationship. And we look forward to hosting you, Vice Premier Wang and State Councilor Dai, next year in Washington for the third round of the strategic and economic dialogue.
(Applause.)
MODERATOR: (Inaudible.)
SECRETARY GEITHNER: (Inaudible) offer my appreciation to Vice-Premier Wang and State Councilor Dai. (Inaudible.) I want to thank all of those who joined us from the administration here today, and to say what a pleasure (inaudible) together in China. (Inaudible.)
Our economic relationship is strong and will get stronger. It rests on recognition by Presidents Hu and Obama (inaudible) and shared responsibilities. Over the past year, we have acted together to help restore financial stability and economic growth to a (inaudible). And because we stood together, and because our presidents (inaudible) act quickly and decisively, (inaudible) in a much stronger condition (inaudible) to successfully overcome the challenges still ahead.
When people write the history of this economic crisis, they will point to the decisive role played by international cooperation, in stark contrast with much of the pattern in past crises, where division (inaudible) and nations turn (inaudible). And in writing that story, the story will point to the critical role played by the United States and China, and the remarkable story of two nations, with such different traditions and such different stages of development, coming together with common objectives (inaudible) action.
Last July, when we met in Washington, China and the United States (inaudible) economic growth. The G20 embraced that cause, and recognized it as a global (inaudible). And since that time, China and the United States (inaudible). Americans are (inaudible) investing more, and borrowing less from the rest of the world, and China is consuming and importing more.
We work together, China the United States, (inaudible) substantial increase in financial resources for emerging markets and developing economies through the IMF and the multilateral development banks, and to restore trade (inaudible). And these commitments, these actions, were essential to arresting the freefall in global economic activity and averting much greater damage to the livelihoods of hundreds and millions of people around the world.
And, quietly but surely, we — China and the United States — are building a very strong network of cooperative arrangements on a range of goals, from boosting access to trade financial facilities for small and medium-sized enterprises, (inaudible), helping each (inaudible).
This second meeting of the strategic and economic dialogue takes place against the backdrop of a promising (inaudible) pave the road to China and the United States and across (inaudible), tempered by a recognition of the challenges faced by countries in Europe in (inaudible), sustainable, and promoting more balanced economic growth.
We agree here to do (inaudible) to strengthen and reinforce this global economic recovery, and we agree to support the strong programs of policy reforms and financial support now being undertaken by the nations of Europe. We welcome the strong commitment of President Hu to the process of economic reform to expand domestic demand and increase household consumption, to expand market access and keep with established international, economic, and trade goals, and to advance trade and investment liberalization.
We welcome the fact that China’s leaders have recognized that reform of the exchange rate mechanism is an important part of their broader economic reform agenda. Allowing the exchange rate to reflect market forces is important, not just to give China the flexibility necessary to sustain more balanced economic growth with low inflation, but also to reinforce (inaudible) resources more productive, higher value-added activity (inaudible).
Now, this is, of course, China’s choice. And we welcome the progress we have achieved to provide a more level playing field for American firms exporting to China and operating in China. China has taken a series of steps to adjust and modify its programs designed to promote (inaudible) and technological advancement. China has revised certain aspects of this (inaudible), such as the requirement that products be (inaudible) or trademarked in China, eligible for certain (inaudible). China has a firm commitment to abide by the principles of non-discrimination, market competition, open trade, intellectual property rights protection, and leaving the terms of technology transfer and production (inaudible) to agreements between enterprises.
And we have agreed to a process of dialogues in the coming weeks and months, led by my colleague, Ambassador Kirk, Secretary Locke, and Office of Science and Technologies Director, John Holdren to find ways to address our main concerns.
We also welcome (inaudible) procurement by July of 2010, as well as a commitment to reduce barriers (inaudible) high-technology goods, high-end (inaudible), and energy saving products (inaudible) facilitate more (inaudible). With this progress, it does not (inaudible) all our concern, but it gives us a set of (inaudible). And I want to thank Vice-Premier Wang, in particular, for his personal role in advancing the practical solutions to our concerns.
The relationship between our two countries is strong and beneficial to both sides. American exports to China are growing much more rapidly (inaudible). Compared to the first quarter of 2009, (inaudible) by the crisis. Our exports to China have risen by almost 50 percent, roughly double (inaudible). And these developments demonstrate (inaudible) the strength and dynamism of the American economy. It demonstrates the importance and the (inaudible) process (inaudible) in China, (inaudible). It demonstrates that our strengths are complementary. They demonstrate that American companies are leaders in innovation in the goods and services that the world needs to grow.
We are seeing a (inaudible) rise in private investments in the United States, dramatic ongoing (inaudible) supported by a stronger financial system, a carefully designed and very substantial commitment by the U.S. Government to promote investment, innovation, and basic research.
We bring to the dialogue respect for China’s interests, and a commitment to close cooperation on all the major global challenges of our time. And we bring a recognition of the special responsibility of the United States to contribute to the stability of the global financial (inaudible).
I want to conclude, again, by expressing my sincere appreciation to President Hu, Premier Wen, Vice-Premier Wang (inaudible), for their commitment to work to strengthen this relationship, and we look forward to continuing progress in the forthcoming G20 meetings. (Inaudible.) Thank you.
(Applause.)

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Remarks at the Closing of the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Great Hall of the People
Beijing, China
May 25, 2010

SECRETARY CLINTON: Thank you very much. On behalf of all of the American delegation, I want to thank our generous hosts, Vice-Premier Wang and State Councilor Dai, for their excellent preparation and the extraordinary time that has been given to this dialogue, along with the Chinese team and the American team. This dialogue is the premier forum for one of the most important and complex relationships in the world. And the breadth and depth of our delegation continues to grow, because it reflects the agenda that we are working on together.
Earlier this year, our relationship faced uncertainty, and many questioned the direction we were heading. Now, in an earlier era, we might have experienced a lasting set-back. But this dialogue mechanism, and the habits of cooperation it has helped create, along with the confidence it has built, helped put us rapidly back on a positive track. This strategic and economic dialogue (inaudible), and it reflects the maturity, durability, and strength of our relationship. So, over the last days we discussed a wide range of the most complex bilateral, regional, and global challenges.
Now, as we have said many times, we do not agree on every issue. We don’t agree even sometimes on the perception of the issue. But that is partly what this dialogue is about. It is a place where we can discuss everything, as State Councilor Dai said, from Taiwan to universal human rights. And in the course of doing so, we are developing that positive, cooperative, and comprehensive understanding that leads to the relationship for the 21st century that both President Obama and President Hu Jintao put into motion when they agreed to do this dialogue.
The success of the U.S.-China relationship will ultimately be measured by the results we deliver to our people. Do our dialogues and our collaborations produce changes that people see in their daily lives, and that contribute to global progress or not? That is both our challenge and our responsibility.
So, this round of the dialogue did not solve all of our shared problems, but it did produce a number of concrete results, some of which you saw as Chinese and American officials came forward to sign memoranda of understanding.
One in particular is in our efforts to meet the challenges of climate change and clean energy. We signed an agreement that, for the first time, will allow American experts to work closely with Chinese colleagues to begin exploring China’s vast natural gas potential. We believe that could well lead to new economic opportunities in both countries, and a lower carbon emission load for our planet. This is part of the broader drive for energy security and greater market transparency and efficiency, closer cooperation, and more focus on cleaner energy (inaudible).
Earlier today I was pleased to sign with State Councilor Liu (inaudible) U.S.-China consultation on people-to-people exchange. President Obama has announced a goal of sending 100,000 American students to China in the next 4 years to learn Mandarin, to experience Chinese culture, and to learn about the hospitality of the Chinese people, while they serve as ambassadors for the United States in China. And toward this end, I want to thank State Councilor Liu for her announcement of 10,000 scholarships for American students.
Our U.S.-China relationship must extend beyond the halls of government to our homes, our businesses, and our schools. And these exchanges really offer the opportunity for people to connect and collaborate, and they remind us of how much we have in common.
As part of this dialogue, we also had our most serious high-level discussion to date on development, which is a core pillar of our foreign policy, along with diplomacy and defense. And we had very frank and detailed conversations about international security challenges and regional hot spots, including Iran and North Korea. We stressed the importance of reaching a conclusion on resolution of the United Nations Security Council to send a message to Iran to, “Live up to your international responsibilities or face growing isolation and consequences.”
Similarly, with respect to North Korea, the United States and China share the objective of peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula. Last year, we worked to pass and enforce a strong UN Security Council resolution in the wake of North Korea’s nuclear test. Now we must work together again to address the serious challenge provoked by the sinking of the South Korean ship.
We are looking forward to working with our friends in South Korea. We appreciated the very statesmanlike approach that President Lee is following, and the prudent measures that he announced in his speech. No one is more concerned about the peace and stability in this region than the Chinese. We know this is a shared responsibility. And in the days ahead, we will work with the international community and our Chinese colleagues to fashion an effective and appropriate response. The consultations between China and the United States have started here in Beijing. They continue very closely, and we expect to be working together to resolve this matter.
China and the United States are two great nations with a compelling interest in global stability and security. We have different histories, and are at different stages in our development. But we recognize that we share a responsibility for meeting the challenges of our time, from combating climate change to curbing nuclear proliferation and rebalancing the global economy. This dialogue is a mechanism to exercise that collective leadership and meet our collective responsibilities.
So, there is much that we have worked on and that we are accomplishing that can only happen when people come together and meet as we have. Yesterday, President Hu Jintao said in his opening remarks, “Not even the most sophisticated telecommunication technology can replace face-to-face exchanges.” Well, he is absolutely right. So I am very pleased that we had face-to-face exchanges, and we developed greater understanding and deepened our relationship. And we look forward to hosting you, Vice Premier Wang and State Councilor Dai, next year in Washington for the third round of the strategic and economic dialogue.
(Applause.)

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Closing Remarks for U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State, Bureau of Public Affairs
Secretary of the Treasury Timothy Geithner, Chinese State Councilor Dai Bingguo, and Chinese Vice Premier Wang Qishan
Eisenhower Executive Office Building
Washington, DC
July 28, 2009

Link to Video


SECRETARY CLINTON: Good afternoon. We have just finished a very thorough, intense, and productive two days. Secretary Geithner and I were honored to co-chair the Strategic and Economic Dialogue, and we have been delighted to host Vice Premier Wang and State Councilor Dai and the entire Chinese delegation.
What has taken place over the past two days is unprecedented in U.S.-China relations. The meetings we have just concluded represent the largest gathering ever of top leaders from our two countries. The range of issues covered was unparalleled. And the result is that we have laid the foundation for a positive, cooperative and comprehensive relationship for the 21st century.
Our governments released a joint statement summarizing our discussions. During our meetings, we spoke candidly about some of the world’s most difficult challenges. We agreed that further cooperation and action is needed to achieve global economic recovery, to promote stability in Northeast Asia, resume the Six-Party Talks, and implement UN Security Council Resolution 1874 to address ongoing threats of violent extremism and nuclear proliferation, to encourage Iran to live up to its international obligations, and to work toward peace and stability in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Middle East.
We made progress in working toward the global nuclear security summit that President Obama has called for next spring. And I’m pleased to announce that we will be conducting U.S.-China talks on counterterrorism this fall. We agreed to a continuation and expansion of our military-to-military relations and to robust educational, cultural, scientific, and people-to-people diplomacy.
For our part, the United States was proud to reaffirm our participation in the Shanghai World Expo next year. And later this evening, we and our Chinese colleagues will participate in a dinner of American business leaders and citizens supporting that effort. In areas where we do not always agree, such as human rights, we had candid and respectful exchanges.
We also today, representing the world’s two biggest producers and consumers of energy, completed a memorandum of understanding to enhance cooperation on climate change, energy, and the environment. This MOU affirmed our commitment to reaching a successful international agreement on climate change and will expand our cooperation to accelerate the transition to a sustainable, low-carbon economy.
These are just a few of the concrete discussions and achievements of this first Strategic and Economic Dialogue. It represents 30 years of progress, because in many ways, we are building on the work that has gone before and taking it to a new level. But sometimes, the most telling measures of progress are less tangible. Over the past two days, State Councilor Dai and I have spent many hours in discussion. We’ve had the opportunity to meet privately and to talk very openly between ourselves to try to understand each other’s point of view. And I know the same is true for Secretary Geithner and Vice Premier Wang.
Our delegations have spent hours in consultation and negotiation, and we’ve not been limited to just the usual topic or two. We’ve enlisted partners from across our government to work across departments and bureaus and agencies to tackle these difficult challenges that we are facing together. Climate change and energy security, for example, is an economic issue, a diplomatic issue, a development issue, an energy issue, an environmental issue, an agricultural issue, and a national security issue all rolled into one. And so it must be addressed in its full complexity. We have made a good start on that and we look forward to continuing it in the future.
This dialogue has established a new pattern of cooperation between our governments and a forum for discussion. It’s begun to develop a structure for moving forward on this range of issues. Now we know there’s a lot of work ahead, but we began this process at the beginning of the Obama Administration for a purpose, because we knew it would take time and effort and patience, and we are willing and eager to continue.
Sunday night, the state councilor and I and a few of our aides were having dinner, and in the course of what was a very relaxed and social occasion, we were discussing our families. And State Councilor Dai informed us that he had a new grandson. As we began talking, we realized that all that we were doing was really on behalf of our children and our grandchildren. I said that perhaps at the beginning of every government dialogue, we should all take out pictures of our children and our grandchildren and put them on the tables in front of us to be reminded of what was at stake in our high-level negotiations. As State Councilor Dai said, those photos would remind us of the task ahead and of our responsibility to move forward and of the future we are trying to build.
We just finished meeting with President Obama and he expressed his appreciation to President Hu for working to set forth this dialogue, starting at their meeting in London. We are committed to taking the next steps on this journey together. And I thank our Chinese colleagues for a very important beginning. It is now my privilege to introduce Secretary Tim Geithner.
SECRETARY GEITHNER: A few highlights on the economic front: I want to begin by just underscoring the importance of the actions China and the United States have taken together to help bring the world economy back from the edge of the most acute crisis we’ve seen in decades, and to begin to lay the foundation for financial repair and global growth again.
We reached agreement today on a framework to lay the foundation for more sustainable and balanced growth between our two countries and globally going forward. And that framework rests on four critical areas of cooperation. First, we agreed that we would undertake macroeconomic and structural policies to lay the foundation for a more sustainable and balanced trajectory of growth.
In the United States, this means raising private savings. We’ve already seen a pretty substantial increase in private savings. Our current account and balance has fallen sharply. And the President has committed that as we put in place conditions for a durable recovery led by private demand, we will bring our fiscal position down to a more sustainable level over time.
We are making very substantial investments in improving public infrastructure, energy efficiency, improving the quality of education, healthcare reform – policy changes that will help rebuild the American economy on a firmer foundation going forward.
For China, this means rebalancing towards domestic demand-led growth and increasing the share of consumption relative to GDP. Policies to enable adjustment of demand and relative prices will help lead to more balanced trading growth, greater development of the service sector and the shift away from dependence on exports and heavy industry will have a powerful effect, not just on rebalancing the global economy, but supporting the transition to a more green economy.
Second area of cooperation is in the financial area. We agreed to work to build more resilient, more stable financial systems. Our challenges in this area are very different. In the United States, we need to put in place much stronger oversight with much stronger constraints on leverage, more conservative capital requirements applied more broadly across our financial system, to bring markets that are critical to credit and innovation, such as in the derivatives area under a framework of oversight, to give the government better tools, stronger tools to deal with, manage, limit the damage caused by future financial crises.
China, in contrast, is moving towards a more market-oriented financial system. And it’s indicated in this – in our meetings today its intention to move forward with financial sector reform that’ll help better allocate credit in – to reinforce this shift towards domestic demand. In this context, China will, of course, bring about further liberalization of interest rates, domestic interest rates, to promote the development of new financial products, open new opportunities for foreign participation in the financial sector, including allowing foreign banks to underwrite bonds in China’s rapidly growing bond market.
Third area of cooperation is in the trade and investment area. We reaffirmed our very important commitment to open – an open, rules-based, multilateral regime for trade and investment. We reiterated our commitment to avoid protectionist measures to bring about a success – and to bring about a successful conclusion to the Doha round. China and the United States committed to treating firms with foreign ownership operating in our markets exactly as we do domestically owned firms when it comes to government procurement. We agreed to work together to facilitate Chinese accession to the WTO Government Procurement Agreement, and China will increase the dollar threshold for foreign direct investments that must obtain central government approval.
Fourth and finally, China and the United States recognized the critical role of the international financial institutions in preventing future crises. The global economy has changed fundamentally since the Bretton Woods Institutions were created more than 50 years ago, and the global financial architecture has to adapt to reflect the new realities of this global economy.
So we have committed to work closely together to help reform these institutions, to make sure they have the resources to respond to future crises to help meet the economic and development needs of their members, and to bring about changes in the governing structure of these institutions to make sure China enjoys a level of participation that’s commensurate with its substantial economic and financial weight in the world.
We look forward to building on this framework of cooperation. We look forward to continuing to intensify the very substantial progress we achieved today on this broad framework for cooperation. And I want to thank in particular Vice Premier Wang for his leadership and for his dedication to make this a productive relationship for both of us. Thank you very much.
I now give the floor to Vice Premier Wang.
VICE PREMIER WANG: (Via interpreter) Dear friends from the news media, good afternoon. Under the direct guidance of President Hu Jintao and President Barack Obama, and through the concerted efforts of both sides, this round of the China-U.S. Strategic and Economic Dialogues was a full success.
In the economic dialogue, the two sides focused on the main topic of the international financial crisis, acted in a spirit of cooperation, had in-depth discussion on strategic issues concerning the two economies, and produced many important results. The two sides recognized that at this crucial, critical time when the global economy is moving out of the crisis and toward recovery, to stimulate economic growth remains the top priority for China-U.S. cooperation. The two sides need to strengthen macroeconomic policy coordination, stabilize financial markets, and work to restore economic growth and create jobs.
At the same time, the two sides should actively transform economic growth patterns focused on restructuring, step up cooperation in such areas as healthcare reform and development of the social security system, and promote sustainable economic development. The two sides stated that they will strengthen cooperation to jointly build a strong financial system to ensure financial security and stability in the two countries and the world at large.
The U.S. side pledged to monitor closely the influence of its monetary policies on the U.S. economy and on the rest of the world, and to have strong oversight of the government-sponsored enterprises to ensure that they are able to meet their financial obligations. The two sides agreed to inform each other of their disposal of impaired financial assets on a regular basis.
The two sides stressed the importance to take strong measures to raise the level of economic cooperation and trade, and improve its quality. The U.S. side pledged to facilitate exports of high-technology products from the United States to China. The U.S. side is willing to step up cooperation with the Chinese side to work toward recognition of China’s market economy status in an expeditious manner. The two sides will work together to support increasing investment in infrastructure, continue to advance negotiations on bilateral investment agreement, and enhance cooperation in trade finance.
China and the United States will work with the international community to implement the consensus of the G-20 summits in Washington and London, strengthen coordination, and ensure that the G-20 summit in Pittsburgh will deliver positive results. China and the United States will work together to promote the reform process of the international financial system and increase the voices and representation of emerging and developing countries.
The two sides stated that they are firmly opposed to protectionism in all forms and work for early success of the WTO Doha round negotiations on the basis of locking up the existing achievements. The two sides will see to it that the UN MDGs be met as scheduled. The success of the economic dialogue has lent fresh impetus to the development of the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive China-U.S. relationship for the 21st century. Thank you. I’ve been speaking so fastly because I provided transcript and I want to save time.
To conclude, I wish to extend to Secretary Clinton and Secretary Geithner and the U.S. team that they lead my appreciation. And I want to thank, in particular, our friends from the media. Our dialogue, through your support, have been further advocated and you have helped us to put down some speculations. Any meeting in isolation of the media, its influence, will be greatly diminished. Talking about influence, there are positive ones and negative ones. There are accurate ones and sometimes not-so-accurate ones. It happens.
So with the help of the media, we are spreading information about what we are doing, and we need to bear the consequences and imperfections. I’ve been dealing with you – with the media for many years. Thank you for your support. Thank you.
STATE COUNCILOR DAI: (Via interpreter) I would like to provide a piece of news. Just now, President Obama met us and he gave a basketball to Vice Premier Wang with his signature, and Vice Premier Wang hit it well while it’s here. (Laughter.)
SECRETARY CLINTON: Do a spin. (Laughter.)
STATE COUNCILOR DAI: (Via interpreter) Dear friends from the press, I’m happy to meet you here. You all know that the China-U.S. S&ED – you know the story how it came into existence. That was decided by President Hu Jintao and President Obama during their meeting in London during the G-20 summit. They made the decision together to build such a mechanism. I think this is a continuation and development of the previous dialogues. It is also a creation.
How did the dialogues go? The three special representatives have said a lot and I would like to add a few things. I think the dialogues were successful. We discussed a wide range of issues except for going to the moon. Of course, we had our discussions openly, and I think the discussions are in-depth, broad, candid, and productive. What has happened proves and history will continue to prove in the future that the decision made by our two presidents to conduct such dialogues is absolutely right and important. Many years from now when we look back, we will understand better its importance.
In the future, I am looking forward to continuing our efforts together with the three special representatives with commitment and efforts of our two presidents to make our dialogues better. Of course, another important mission is to turn what we said into actions. This is more important.
And secondly, I wish to say that you can read the joint press release that is going to be provided very soon. The document talks about President Obama’s upcoming visit to China within this year. And on the Chinese side, we will work together closely with the U.S. side to make good preparations to ensure that President Obama’s visit will be made on schedule and will be very successful, that it will become a historic visit.
Thirdly, I wish to talk about, as you saw yesterday after the opening ceremony, President Obama made a very important speech. He talked about the China-U.S. relations. I suggest, my friends from the press, carefully read the script of President Obama’s speech. In the past half year since the inauguration of the new Administration, the China-U.S. relations have set off to a good start and it has enjoyed a sound momentum of growth. China is ready to work together with the U.S. to stay firmly committed to building a China-U.S. positive, cooperative, and comprehensive relations for the 21st century so that we can bring benefits to our two peoples and our two countries and also the whole world, and to our children and children’s children.
To ensure that our bilateral relationship will move forward on the track of long-term and sound development, a very important thing is that we need to support, respect, and understand each other, and to maintain our core interests. And for China, our concern is we must uphold our basic systems, our national security; and secondly, the sovereignty and territorial integrity; and thirdly, economic and social sustained development.
What I would like to say is that China and the United States, from the government, business communities, and to ordinary people, from the militaries and all walks of life, we must work together, and we can make China-U.S. relations enjoy an even more beautiful future.
Just now, as Vice Premier Wang said, the Chinese team is appreciative of what the American Government and our hosts have done. I would like to thank them for their gracious hospitality and thoughtful arrangements. Especially, I would like to thank Secretary Clinton and Secretary Geithner for the tremendous efforts that were put into the dialogues. It was not easy. There is such a great number of participants. We talked about so many topics and such a huge number of government departments and ministries were involved and the dialogues were so in-depth, and all these were unprecedented in the past three decades since the establishment of diplomatic relations between our two countries.
And I also wish to thank everyone who cares about and supports the growth of China-U.S. relationship, including our friends from the press. You have done a lot. Vice Premier Wang said that the role of the media organizations is very important. I believe you strongly boost – you can strongly boost relations between our two countries and promote friendship and mutual understanding between the two peoples. Thank you very much.

 

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