Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Hillary was in Memphis Tennessee today to attend the dedication of The Marlo Thomas Center for Global Education & Collaboration at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.   We see her with Marlo,  her brother, Tony Thomas, Marlo’s husband, Phil Donahue, and parents and kids in a waiting area at the clinic.

11=20=14=Y-01 11=20=14=Y-02 11=20=14=Y-03 11=20=14=Y-04 11=20=14=Y-05 11=20=14=Y-06 11=20=14=Y-07 11=20=14=Y-08 11=20=14=Y-09

11=20=14=Y-10

In Memphis children’s hospital to dedicate the Marlo Thomas Center and see their new proton therapy center.

I am thankful, every day of every year, for having the chance to be on earth at the same time as Hillary Clinton.

2smalllogo

A Little Routine for Life-long Health

All humans are supposed to be creatures of habit, but children really thrive on habit and routine—even when it appears otherwise!  Children deeply benefit from routines that establish healthy habits like regular sleep, nutritious meals eaten around the dinner table, and an organized home. This is because daily and family routines help children develop the cognitive, emotional and social skills they will need to succeed in school and beyond.

Researchers encourage establishing routines with children from infancy for various reasons. Routines help children learn that they can trust and depend on adults—a valuable asset for emotional stability in relationships and an important way to establish parent-child bonds. Meaningful routines—like the ones we practice as rituals during Thanksgiving and other holidays—help children feel like they belong to a community, and improve their social skills. Some research even suggests that children living in families with regular routines suffer from fewer illnesses, like respiratory infections.

Parents and caregivers can help children establish healthy routines that have direct and life-long benefits. For example, parents can read books with their babies and young children at bedtime to help them sleep better. Parents can also establish regular times of conversation, like around the dinner table, to improve bonding and stimulate language. Finally, parents and caregivers can use holiday gatherings like Thanksgiving to instill a sense of tradition and history in the family.

 

Resources for Sharing:

  • This article from the AAP explains how various routines throughout a child’s day can improve moods and benefit development.
  • This article from Raising Children Network offers tips for how parents can incorporate routines and ritual into family life.
  • A reminder that quality time can happen in short intervals—even for busy families!

Video

This beautiful video from BabyWorld shows how a bedtime routine will help your infant get the sleep his body—and brain—need. >>

 

Gratitude for Every Day of the Year

Were you taught to count your blessings as a child?  Turns out, this is important advice for young children and adults alike. While rituals like Thanksgiving serve as a great opportunity to express gratitude within families, new research is showing that teaching young children how to express gratitude on a regular basis is an important skill that will benefit them their entire lives.

According to a growing body of research, there are many benefits to the social, emotional and physical development of children when they are taught to feel and express gratitude regularly. Psychologists have found that when people think about the positive things in their lives—even while experiencing stressful situations—they can increase their happiness, improve sleep, and reduce anxiety.  The benefits stem from brain hormones triggered and released by positive thoughts. These “feel-good” hormones counter the effects of the body’s stress hormones, which can harm developing minds and bodies. Expressing gratitude on a regular basis can improve the immune system, speed up recovery time and prevent chronic illnesses like obesity and heart disease. Finally, the more positive a child’s thinking, the more eager they are to learn and engage with others. This improves their social relationships and encourages new connections.

This does not mean that parents and caregivers should stop children from expressing negative feelings or emotions. But parents can help young children learn how to think positively and express gratitude by talking about their own gratitude for the positive things and people in their lives. Also, parents and caregivers can help young toddlers develop gratitude by sharing books about thankfulness, and involving them in activities—like delivering donated food to a food bank—that encourage sharing and empathy for others.

 

Resources for Sharing:

  • This news article from the Wall Street Journal explains recent research on gratitude, and how it benefits children and families.
  • Tips, videos and other resources from Greater Good about why gratitude matters—and how to express it regularly!
  • Ten ways to help children express their gratitude, starting now!

Video

This video for parents explains why teaching gratitude can improve health and well-being for their children, and themselves. >>

Here is what Hillary is thankful for today.

Quality child care makes our families & communities stronger. Thanks to the President for signing bipartisan child care bill.

Hillary Rodham Clinton to Deliver Keynote Address at Inaugural Watermark Conference for Women

Hillary Clinton M.D.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven and Björn Lyrvall, Ambassador of Sweden to the U.S., at the Clinton Foundation in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Lyrvall presented Secretary Clinton with a diploma and doctor’s hat, insignias of an honorary doctorate in medicine that she was awarded in 2007 by the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.(AP Photo/Pontus Höök, Pool)

 11-19-14-Y-01 11-19-14-Y-02 11-19-14-Y-03

The Clinton Foundation does a great deal of work in Africa.  Both Chelsea and Hillary Clinton have made the effort to save African elephants an important item on their agenda at the foundation.  Elephant poaching and wildlife trafficking are tied to funding of terrorist groups and thus pose major security threats.   Chelsea spoke to ELLE Magazine about a joint effort with TOMS Shoes.

Chelsea Clinton Wants You to Save the Elephants by Going Shoe Shopping

November 17

Photo: Courtesy of TOMS

Chelsea Clinton has early memories of going with her parents, Bill and Hillary Clinton, to Little Rock Zoo in Arkansas and visiting the elephants. “[They] were always my favorite part of what already was such a magical day,” she says. Later, in the ’90s, she was able to visit the elephants again in their natural habitat with her mother, and yet again a decade later with her husband. “Seeing different elephant families as my own family has developed has been such a privilege.”

Clinton is speaking with ELLE.com about the animals not only because of her love for them, but because of the Clinton Foundation’s commitment to save Africa’s elephants. Now, in partnership with TOMS shoes, you too can join the effort to help end this crisis.

Read the interview >>>>

Hillary and Chelsea Clinton took the stage at the 10th Anniversary of the Clinton Presidential Center today to discuss the progress of their No Ceilings initiative.

Screenshot 2014-11-15 18.53.54

Hillary began by explaining that the objective of  No Ceilings: The Full Participation Project is to gather data to measure the progress of women and girls from the time of her speech in Beijing to the target date of 2016, the 20th anniversary of that speech.   She framed three questions:

  1. What was the agenda?
  2. What has been accomplished?
  3. What is left to do?

She noted that progress has been made extending elementary education and some secondary education to girls, more needs to be done to confront infant mortality, and a great deal must be done for women to be perceived as members of the formal labor force and to be included in the formal economy.  Identification of barriers to inclusion is essential.  Provision of child care so that women can fully participate in a transformed workplace is a goal.

Chelsea then explained that Beijing was a long time ago (“Don’t remind me!” Hillary added).  She stressed the role of technology and said that Facebook is the largest community of women in the world and that progress must be measured via data.

An example Chelsea offered is the impact of ebola.  She called it a caregivers’ disease which results in caregivers,  largely women, also contracting the disease and succumbing in high numbers, but a tangential effect, she pointed out, was the reduction in available women to perform midwife duties and care for newborns resulting in increased infant and maternal mortality.

Key to today’s discussion were questions of what works and what models are scalable and flexible enough to be modified as needed for different cultures and environments.

Hillary spoke about micro-loans and how that model has been successful in preventing dreams from “dying in bank parking lots,” as a young woman once told her.  Barriers here include husbands who want to control the assets once the women get the loans.

Guest speakers were local.  Annette Dove talked about “Changing Steps” which is meant to inspire and mentor young people from disadvantaged homes to reach higher education goals.  Dove spoke of an “imagination gap” that needs to be closed in such communities.

Pierre Ferrari spoke about Heifer, of which he is CEO and which provides livestock after training.  Chelsea mentioned that her late grandmother, Dorothy Rodham, gave her a heifer for Christmas every year,  Ferrari said the organization donates 1.5 million animals a year mostly to women who, he said, do 70% of the labor.  Training includes care of the animal (the asset)  and handling the profits.   Ferrari said 85% of the decisions are made by women and that data shows that once they have proven their economic skills in the home, the husbands of the women tend to support their participation in the larger economic community.

Hillary, at this point, mentioned the book Beatrice’s Goat, a true story for which she wrote the foreword.  Beatrice of the story went on to study in the U.S.,  interned for Hillary in her Senate office, and eventually got a master’s degree from the Clinton School in public policy.

Hillary also said that the barriers to women’s progress is often surprising.  Chelsea offered the recently reported forced sterilizations in India wherein the mothers-in-law are often the ones forcing the daughters-in-law to be sterilized after the requisite number of sons have been produced.   One cannot help but notice the proprietary role the mother-in-law takes in such a case coming right on the heels of the livestock discussion.  Daughters-in-law are not goats.

Anna Strong from Arkansas Children’s Hospital spoke of several programs offered through the hospital’s auspices including HIPPY (encouraging parents to begin teaching children at home), a health center run out of an elementary school, and an advocacy group for children and families.  Hillary added that HIPPY began in Israel during the wave of Ethiopian immigration.  As FLOAR Hillary had the founder visit Arkansas.

I lost the feed, and sadly did not get the name of the next excellent speaker who spoke of a single-parent scholarship fund model that began with two funds and has been replicated to 62 funds (eminently scalable).  She noted that the funds make a permanent dent in poverty and raise the overall education level in the state.

The key word for the day was, as I said earlier, scalability.  All of these programs can be replicated with necessary modifications.   The key, as Hillary, Chelsea, and other speakers emphasized is what works.  No single formula works everywhere.  Hillary stressed that policy decisions should be based on evidence that a program or policy works (or does not work) and not upon ideology.

The Q&A that followed consisted entirely of people’s own creative ideas and models that they wanted to share rather than questions.  Well, after all, it was a Clinton event and people are used to CGI formats where you bring forth your ideas and projects.

There was a moment.  and it was adorable.  We all know that in addition to this No Ceilings initiative, Chelsea and Hillary also have an anti elephant-trafficking effort and Too Small to Fail to encourage parents to help their pre-schoolers be ready for reading and numbers.  Part of that effort involves talking to babies and exposing them to words.  At one point, Chelsea, in response to a remark by Hillary,  referred to “what Grandma said.”   I don’t think she even knew she did it, and Hillary did not seem to notice either.  In case you wondered what title Hillary bears most proudly, it is, obviously,  the one by which her daughter now refers to her.  It is also clear  with whom Chelsea spends much of her time conversing lately.  Earlier, she had said she was “shameless in appreciation of her daughter and her mother.”  Yes, Chelsea, we see that!  We also agree!

11-15-14-Y-01 11-15-14-Y-02

11-15-14-Y-04 11-15-14-Y-05

Here is an account of this and other 10th anniversary events thanks to Ruby Cramer who never fails to share!  Thank you, Ruby!

At Clinton Reunion, Hillary Talks About Past With An Eye To The Future

Most speakers at the Clinton reunion in Little Rock reminisced about the White House years. At her event here, Hillary Clinton talked about women’s issues, and how to move forward. “You’ve got to be willing to let go of what doesn’t work.”

posted on Nov. 15, 2014

 

Congratulations, Mme. Secretary!

Cindy Leive (l) Chelsea Clinton (c) Hillary Clinton (r)

Cindi Leive (l) Chelsea Clinton (c) Hillary Clinton (r)

NBCC Honors Hillary Rodham Clinton at Annual Gala in New York

Hillary Rodham Clinton to Receive a Special Award Commemorating Her History of Commitment and Support; Glamour Editor-In-Chief Cindi Leive to Receive Leadership Award; Ghecemy Lopez and Wanda Lucas to Receive Advocacy Awards

 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 13, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The National Breast Cancer Coalition will host its Annual New York Gala on November 19 at 583 Park Avenue in New York City. This year, NBCC is proud to honor Hillary Rodham Clinton, Cindi Leive, Editor-in-Chief, Glamour, along with advocates Ghecemy Lopez and Wanda Lucas.

These awards recognize individuals who have made a true difference in the world of breast cancer and embody the spirit of NBCC—passionate, relentless and mission-driven social innovators. NBCC is pleased to recognize them for their leadership and the extraordinary work they have done toward ending breast cancer.

During President Bill Clinton’s administration, NBCC President Fran Visco was appointed as one of three members of the President’s Cancer panel. She was re-appointed to successive terms and served as a member of the President’s Cancer Panel Special Commission on Breast Cancer until its dissolution.

Read more >>>>

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 591 other followers

%d bloggers like this: