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Hillary Clinton Statement on Appointment of António Guterres as UN Secretary General

Today, Hillary Clinton released the following statement on the official appointment of António Guterres as the next United Nations Secretary-General:

“I would like to extend my warmest congratulations to António Guterres on his appointment as the next Secretary-General of the United Nations. Throughout his career, Mr. Guterres has proven himself to be an advocate for human rights and a champion for the most vulnerable. As UN High Commissioner for Refugees, he provided help and hope to millions of men, women and children who have been forced to flee from their homes.  And he is a consensus-builder who can bring people together to advance common interests and address common challenges. I was heartened that Mr. Guterres indicated that gender equality will be a top priority when filling senior positions. I strongly support efforts that increase diversity in UN leadership. And if I’m elected President of the United States, I look forward to working with Mr. Guterres and all of our partners to help shape a more peaceful and prosperous future for every global citizen.”

Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, Secretary of State of the United States of America shakes hands with United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres, right, during the UNHCR Intergovernmental event at the ministerial level of Member States of the United Nations, at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Wednesday Dec. 7, 2011. (AP Photo/Keystone/Martial Trezzini)

Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, Secretary of State of the United States of America shakes hands with United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres, right, during the UNHCR Intergovernmental event at the ministerial level of Member States of the United Nations, at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Wednesday Dec. 7, 2011. (AP Photo/Keystone/Martial Trezzini)

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So on the day when this happened:

‘Russia’s Senior-Most officials’ Ordered DNC Hack

It wasn’t low-level flunkies or some “400-pound” hacker, as Trump suggested. Top Kremlin officials directed the hacks on America’s political system, U.S. intelligence publicly said.

Shane Harris Nancy A. Youssef 10.07.16

The Obama administration has concluded that “Russia’s senior-most officials” ordered hackers to break into the computer networks of American political organizations in order “to interfere with the U.S. election process,” intelligence and security agencies said in a joint statement Friday.

Read more >>>>

Also this happened.

AP Top News

APNewsBreak: UN criticism of Trump draws Russian complaint

GENEVA (AP) — Russia lodged a formal complaint last month with the United Nations over a top U.N. official’s condemnations of Donald Trump and some European politicians, an intervention that underscores the unusual links between the Republican presidential nominee and the Kremlin.

There is no evidence Trump sought Russia’s assistance, or was even aware of the criticism by Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, the U.N. high commissioner for human rights.

Vitaly Churkin, Russia’s ambassador to the United Nations, told The Associated Press on Friday that he complained to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon about Zeid’s remarks.

Read more  >>>>

Of course, Trump does not even need to request this kind of defense from Russia since it is clear that they are interfering and on whose behalf.

Hillary’s campaign responded to the administration’s announcement.

Hillary For America Statement On U.S. Government Formally Naming Russia Responsible For Election-Related Hacks

John Podesta, Chair of Hillary of America, released the following statement Friday in response to the U.S. government formally naming the Russian government as responsible for recent hacks intended to interfere with the U.S. presidential election:

“The world now knows, beyond the shadow of any doubt, that the hack of the Democratic National Committee was carried out by the Russian government in a clear attempt to interfere with the integrity of our elections. The only remaining question is why Donald Trump continues to make apologies for the Russians. Trump’s initial reaction to the hack in July was to invite further intrusions by the Russians. Even after he was reportedly briefed on the very findings that were just announced publicly by U.S. government officials, he stood on a debate stage one week ago and played dumb about Russia’s role in this hack. He has repeatedly praised Vladimir Putin, outlined a list of pro-Putin policies, and has done hundreds of millions of dollars of business with Russian interests. Even his own running mate has criticized Putin yet Trump continues to refuse. It should concern every American that Russia is willing to engage in such hostile acts in order to help Donald Trump become President of the United States. But even worse, Trump’s own actions suggests he welcomes the help. If he wants to reassure American voters, he must not only acknowledge and condemn Russia’s role in this outrageous intrusion against U.S. interests, but he must finally disclose the full extent of his ties to Russia and divest any Russian-linked assets.”

And certainly by now you have all heard about this.  We will leave what The Hill characterized as his “rare half-apology” out of this because it was no apology at all.  Rather, it was an attempt to wipe mud off himself and sling it at Bill Clinton.

Trump caught on hot mic in lewd conversation about women

It is high time the media stopped treating Trump as any kind of serious or qualified candidate and this election cycle as if there were anything normal about it.  That any foreign power, much less Russia, would so boldly attempt to influence a U.S. election is outrageous enough.  We remember, however, that candidate Trump in fact invited them to hack U.S. accounts.  When anyone reminds him of this, he denies he said or meant it or plays the sarcasm card.

There is room for humor, to be sure. JFK was a witty, funny guy, but he’s the one who stared down Khrushchev and the other guy blinked.  The job is not one for a stand-up comic, and the Oval Office is neither a locker room nor a frat house.  Trump’s affect is time and again inappropriate to the event.  His outreach to Putin is intolerable and his off-the-cuff comments about women are sleazy, disgusting, and despicable.

Ironic that our candidate, the most qualified to run perhaps ever, has to combat Trump’s misogyny and sexism as well as antagonism from a foreign adversarial source favoring her opponent. How is this happening in this country?

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Show Hillary you stand with her on her principles!

STAND

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Hillary Rodham Clinton

Remarks to the U.N. 4th World Conference on Women Plenary Session

delivered 5 September 1995, Beijing, China

Hillary Clinton Swears In Melanne Verveer Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks With Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Sir Michael Somare

Question: Prime Minister, could you tell us what more your government can do to try to reduce the very high rates of violence against women in your country?

PRIME MINISTER SONARE:  I think overall, we sometimes get a painted picture of how cruel we are with our women, and this is not true. This is a perception from people like yourself and people who write about us. That’s what they like to paint about this country. And I’m telling you that I have been around for a long time and I know that men and the women, sometimes there are fights, arguments do take place, but it’s nothing very brutal about violence against women…

… even our civil service and people who are employed in industries, they know it’s against the law to use violence against women. We have cases where people are drunk, which you know might (inaudible) a person who cannot control when he’s under the influence of liquor. And you find that sometimes (inaudible) it takes place in some places. We cannot deny it….

… we are doing everything possible, and through the education system alone and allowing the women to play a very important role in a society. That’s the only way we can overcome this problem. But all in all, sometimes it’s exaggerated by people who write about us.

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at Women’s Empowerment Event Papua New Guinea

In Afghanistan, U.S. shifts strategy on women’s rights as it eyes wider priorities

By Rajiv Chandrasekaran Washington Post Staff WriterMonday, March 14, 2011

A senior U.S. official involved in Afghanistan policy said changes to the land program also stem from a desire at the top levels of the Obama administration to triage the war and focus on the overriding goal of ending the conflict.

“Gender issues are going to have to take a back seat to other priorities,” said the senior official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal policy deliberations. “There’s no way we can be successful if we maintain every special interest and pet project. All those pet rocks in our rucksack were taking us down.”

Hillary and Melanne began calling Melanne’s office the “pet rock office.”  Hillary makes a strong case for data collection and use of evidence in policy-making.

Secretary Clinton in San Francisco

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks to the APEC Women and the Economy Summit

… there will be a temptation on the part of those observing or covering this summit, perhaps on the part of those of us attending it as well, to say that our purpose is chiefly to advance the rights of women, to achieve justice and equality on women’s behalf. And that is, of course, a noble cause to be sure and one that is very close to my heart. But at the risk of being somewhat provocative at the outset, I believe our goal is even bolder, one that extends beyond women to all humankind. The big challenge we face in these early years of 21st century is how to grow our economies and ensure shared prosperity for all nations and all people. We want to give every one of our citizens, men and women alike, young and old alike, greater opportunity to find work, to save and spend money, to pursue happiness ultimately to live up to their own God-given potentials.

That is a clear and simple vision to state. But to make it real, to achieve the economic expansion we all seek, we need to unlock a vital source of growth that can power our economies in the decades to come. And that vital source of growth is women. With economic models straining in every corner of the world, none of us can afford to perpetuate the barriers facing women in the workforce.

 

Secretary Clinton: Women, Peace and Security

Hillary does not mention this speech in this chapter, and I know I have linked to it many times over the years including in this retrospective.  To me it crystallizes the integrity of her thinking on so many issues.  Just in case you have missed this must-read, here it is once more.

Hillary Clinton’s Classic Speech to the Lower Mekong Initiative Womens’ Gender Equality and Empowerment Dialogue

Statement on Presidential Memorandum Promoting Gender Equality

I’m so pleased about the Presidential Memorandum that President Obama signed yesterday, which institutionalizes an elevated focus on global women’s issues at the State Department and USAID and ensures coordination on these issues across the federal government. And it is so important that incoming Secretary of State John Kerry has expressed his support for the continued elevation of these issues in our foreign policy.

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Secretary Clinton’s Comments on the Special Session of the Human Rights Council on the Situation in Libya

 

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks at the Human Rights Council

It is time to overcome the false divide that pits religious sensitivities against freedom of expression and pursue a new approach based on concrete steps to fight intolerance wherever it occurs.

U.S. Accomplishments at the UN Human Rights Council

DEFENDING CORE PRINCIPLES

Protecting Freedom of Expression in the Context of Religious Intolerance: The United States was instrumental in galvanizing support for a consensus resolution that marks a sea change in the global dialogue on countering offensive and hateful speech based upon religion or belief. The “Combating Discrimination and Violence” resolution underscores the vital importance of protecting freedom of expression and ends the divisive debate over the highly problematic concept of “defamation of religions.”

U.S. Secretary of State Clinton listens to clergy as she walks out after Sunday service in Beijing

 

Hillary Clinton in Egypt: A Background Briefing

… she will be meeting with women civil society activists from a range of walks of life, some who work on democracy and education and health, some who work in the business sector, so a cross-section of women who also reflect the kind of deep diversity of Egypt’s civil society. And then she’ll be meeting with more than a dozen Christian leaders from across Egypt, who represent a variety of denominations – Coptic Christians, but other Christians as well – to hear from them about their concerns and to talk to them about what they plan to do to contribute to the democratic transition and to a new Egypt over time.

Hillary Clinton in Egypt: Day Two

… democracy has to mean more than just elections. It has to mean that the majority will be protecting the rights of the minority. And here in Egypt, we are committed to protecting and advancing the rights of all Egyptians – men and women, Muslim and Christian. Everyone who is a citizen of Egypt deserves the same rights under the law…

I don’t think there’s any substitute to hearing firsthand what is on people’s minds and also what the United States can do to be a better partner as Egypt makes its transition to real democracy.

 

Hillary Clinton at the Consulate Flag-Raising in Alexandria Egypt

… real democracy means that every citizen has the right to live, work, and worship as they choose, whether they are man or woman, Muslim or Christian, or from any other background. Real democracy means that no group or faction or leader can impose their will, their ideology, their religion, their desires on anyone else.

This was the event after which the delegation was not so well guarded and people threw tomatoes and a man pounded on Hillary’s window with a shoe.

Secretary Clinton’s Statement on the Murder of Ugandan LGBT Activist David Kato

 

Everywhere I travel on behalf of our country, I make it a point to meet with young people and activists — people like David — who are trying to build a better, stronger future for their societies. I let them know that America stands with them, and that their ideas and commitment are indispensible to achieving the progress we all seek.

This crime is a reminder of the heroic generosity of the people who advocate for and defend human rights on behalf of the rest of us — and the sacrifices they make. And as we reflect on his life, it is also an occasion to reaffirm that human rights apply to everyone, no exceptions, and that the human rights of LGBT individuals cannot be separated from the human rights of all persons.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, “Oh, Hillary, here you go again.”

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni at the London Conference on Somalia

Hillary Clinton Releases 2008 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks on the Release of the 2009 Annual Report on Human Rights

Secretary Clinton’s Remarks Upon Releasing The 2010 Human Rights Report

Secretary Clinton Releases 2011 Human Rights Report

 Hillary Rodham Clinton

Hillary Clinton Grants Benefits to Same-Sex Domestic Partners of Foreign Service Personnel

Hillary Clinton’s Remarks at the State Department LBGT Pride Celebration

… think about what’s happening to people as we speak today. Men and women are harassed, beaten, subjected to sexual violence, even killed, because of who they are and whom they love. Some are driven from their homes or countries, and many who become refugees confront new threats in their countries of asylum. In some places, violence against the LGBT community is permitted by law and inflamed by public calls to violence; in others, it persists insidiously behind closed doors.

These dangers are not “gay” issues. This is a human rights issue. (Applause.) Just as I was very proud to say the obvious more than 15 years ago in Beijing that human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights, well, let me say today that human rights are gay rights and gay rights are human rights, once and for all.

Hillary Clinton to LGBT Youth: Tomorrow Will Be Better

Secretary Clinton’s Human Rights Day Speech

Today, I want to talk about the work we have left to do to protect one group of people whose human rights are still denied in too many parts of the world today. In many ways, they are an invisible minority. They are arrested, beaten, terrorized, even executed. Many are treated with contempt and violence by their fellow citizens while authorities empowered to protect them look the other way or, too often, even join in the abuse. They are denied opportunities to work and learn, driven from their homes and countries, and forced to suppress or deny who they are to protect themselves from harm.

I am talking about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people, human beings born free and given bestowed equality and dignity, who have a right to claim that, which is now one of the remaining human rights challenges of our time.

CGI 2013 Day Two: Women Decision Makers

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Hillary Clinton Outlines “No Ceilings” Initiative at Pennsylvania Conference for Women

Hillary ends the chapter and her book with reflections about her mother, Dorothy Howell Rodham, who passed away in late 2011.  My heart broke for Hillary when her mother died.  I sat down and wrote a condolence note.  I wrote what was in my heart about her mom and  her loss.  I did not even keep a draft or a copy.  Several weeks later, quite to my astonishment,  I received a lovely thank you note from her.

Hillary Clinton: A Daughter’s Duty

Thing is, the business is never finished.  There is always more to do!

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Hillary Clinton’s ‘Hard Choices’ Retrospective: Introduction

Access other chapters of this retrospective here >>>>

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Hillary, back home from her west coast and Canada trek,  helped kick off the celebration of International  Women’s Day today at U.N. Headquarters in New York.  The event,  “Equality for Women is Progress for All”  was part of the United Nations International Women’s Day, which is celebrated tomorrow, March 8,  dates back to the beginning of the 20th Century, and has been marked at the United Nations since 1975.

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National & International News

Hillary Clinton Urges Equality for Women and Girls

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke at the U.N. commemoration of International Women’s Day fighting for women’s rights.

Saturday, Mar 8, 2014

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton declared Friday that achieving equality for women and girls is “the great unfinished business of the 21st century.”

The potential 2016 presidential candidate galvanized the U.N. commemoration of International Women’s Day, repeating her resounding declaration as first lady at the 1995 U.N. women’s conference in Beijing that “human rights are women’s rights — and women’s rights are human rights.”

Clinton said that important progress has been made, citing the increasing number of girls in school and women in elected office, and the repeal of many discriminatory laws.

“Yet for all we have achieved together, this remains the great unfinished business of the 21st century,” she said.

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Update: Link to video below tweeted by Hillary. Thank you, Hillary!

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. SecGen Ban Ki-moon great to see you for yesterday. Watch here:

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Ban pledges UN commitment to advancing gender equality, women’s empowerment

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (second right) with from left: Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the Executive Director of UN Women, former United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her daughter Chelsea Clinton. UN Photo/Evan Schneider

4 February 2014 – Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today pledged to root for women everywhere ahead of his departure for the Winter Olympics in Sochi, while stressing the need for the United Nations and its partners to lay the groundwork to enable all women to enjoy their rights and be empowered.

“We are at a key moment,” Mr. Ban said at a photo-op with former United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the Executive Director of the UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), ahead of their meeting at UN Headquarters.

He noted that 2015 will be crucial for the future of development and the future of women’s rights. Next year marks the target date for the achievement of the global anti-poverty targets known as the Millennium Development Goals, which contain specific benchmarks for gender equality.

Read more and see video >>>>

pledges commitment to advancing gender equality, women’s empowerment

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This tweet just came through.

UN Women@UN_Women

#UNSG praises “visionary” leadership of Michelle #Bachelet, following her announcement of departure from @UN_Women http://owl.li/j1wlQ

Full statement.

Secretary-General Praises ‘Visionary’ Leadership of Michelle Bachelet,

Following Announcement by UN-Women Chief of Departure

Following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon’s statement on the announcement by Michelle Bachelet of her departure as Executive Director of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women):

Ms. Michelle Bachelet has informed me of her intention to step down as Executive Director of UN-Women.  I would like to express my tremendous gratitude for her outstanding service.

Michelle Bachelet was the right person in the right job at the right time.  Her visionary leadership gave UN-Women the dynamic start it needed.  Her fearlessness in advocating for women’s rights raised the global profile of this key issue.  Her drive and compassion enabled her to mobilize and make a difference for millions of people across the world.

Her record of achievement includes new steps to protect women and girls from violence, new advances on health, and a new understanding that women’s empowerment must be at the core of all we do at the United Nations.  This is a stellar legacy, and I am determined to build on it.

I thank Ms. Bachelet for her contributions and wish her every success as she embarks on the next chapter in her extraordinary life.  She will always have a home at the United Nations, and I am confident that she will continue to advance our shared goals for a better future.

Just wondering who out there might be qualified to replace her.  Someone who right now has no official position to prevent her from accepting.  Many saw a certain person we know pretty well taking a position like this at some point.  Someone Michelle knows and respects.  Someone who lives in NY and for whom Michelle might have been willing to place-hold for awhile  … until she was available.  Someone married to another UN employee.  I don’t know!    Can you think of anyone?  Anyone?  Anyone?

Hillary Rodham Clinton,  Michelle Bachelet, 03-02-10-001 Chile's President Bachelet and U.S. Secretary of State Clinton walk together in Santiago 03-02-10-03 Hillary Rodham Clinton,  Michelle Bachelet, 03-02-10-13 03-02-10-14

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Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

Remarks at the Forum on Small States Opening Session

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
United Nations
New York City
October 1, 2012

SECRETARY CLINTON: Thank you very much, Foreign Minister, and thanks also to the Secretary General and the UN General Assembly President for their remarks and for their leadership. I’m delighted to have been invited by Singapore to join you at the Forum of Small States to mark the 20thanniversary of its founding. I think organizing this event and the program that follows this opening provides a valuable opportunity to reflect on the issues that we face as a global community, and in particular, the roles and responsibilities that small states have.In my time as Secretary, I’ve been honored to travel to over 100 countries and to meet with leaders in government, business, and civil society in every corner of the world. Now of course, this means frequent visits to larger nations and traditional centers of power, but for me, it has been equally important to visit many of your countries, to understand what you’re going through, to share ideas about how we can make progress together, to meet the Millennium Development Goals and then the initiative of the Secretary General, the Sustainable Development Goals.

Just last month, I attended the Pacific Islands Forum in the Cook Islands to talk with leaders of the region about how the United States can build stronger partnerships with their countries, and I’ve had similar conversations with small states from around the world. Now I believe this is absolutely essential because we have a lot of challenges that we are confronting, and I don’t think it’s unfair or inaccurate to say that smaller states often bear the burden of a lot of these challenges. These challenges don’t respect international orders, whether it’s a global financial crisis or climate change or transnational crime. And none of these problems can be solved by three or four big countries sitting around a table. We need partnerships from large and small nations alike.

That means we do have to transcend the lines of size or geography, because 21st century challenges require a 21st century approach to foreign policy where we build broad and diverse coalitions with states of every size from every region. That recognizes the reality of the world in which we live, where our futures are inextricably linked, and as we increasingly have seen, that when one of us prospers, the chances for others as well to prosper increase. But when one falters, then everyone will be hurt.

If you look at the global economic meltdown and how it spread across the world, it was because we are now interconnected through markets that are bigger than any one of us. Therefore, we have to address these challenges not just in the G-8 or the G-20, but across the globe. And the economy is one area where even the smallest country can make a significant difference. Singapore, for example, with just over 5 million people, is one of the busiest trade ports in the world, and a frequent destination for investors and CEOs alike. So although it may be a small state, it plays a large role in the global economy.

Our cooperation is also necessary to address climate change. As the Secretary General just said, many of your states are among the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and you have played a major role in sparking global action. In fact, had it not been for a coalition of small states helping push larger countries, including my own, toward agreement and action, we would not have had the outcomes at the Durban meeting that I think moved us forward in the fight against climate change. That agreement is one step, but an important one in the long process of curbing global climate change, and small states will continue to be critical in mobilizing the international community’s response.

It’s also important that we learn from each other. We have a tradition in our federal system in the United States of individual states playing a role in trying out new policies. We call it the laboratories of democracy. So if California or Delaware or Montana or Alabama or New York try something, then other states within our union can see whether or not it works, can adapt it, or even move to make it a national responsibility. I see something similar with small states. Every one of you is doing something that works, and all of us are doing things that don’t work, and we need a better mechanism for sharing what works and being able to follow through with technical advice and assistance where necessary.

I’m particularly intrigued by Bhutan’s gross domestic happiness measurement. After all, what is the purpose of our lives together if it is not to try to provide a better future, particularly for the next generation? Well, that’s just one example. I go places, I see things that work in the smallest states. But too often, we don’t know how to bring it to scale and we don’t know how to spread it broadly. So I hope that through the UN and through this forum, we can get smarter about how to learn from each other to see what works.

I remember very well after the terrible hurricane of Katrina, we learned a lot from the Netherlands and other states that faced periodic and constant threats from flooding. There is a lot that the United States can learn, a lot that we can share, but I hope we can be more intentional in pursuing that.

I also want to thank the – President Jeremic for his emphasis on the rule of law, because ultimately, that is what will determine the success of development – whether investors feel safe, whether there’s predictability, whether people can get about the daily business of having families grow and prosper, businesses grow and prosper, and thereby countries grow and prosper, because there is a sense that justice is available for all.

And certainly, small states play a leading role in human rights. Over the past three years, the United States has been privileged to work with a number of members, as I look about this forum, on the UN Human Rights Council. And along the way, we have overcome traditional divisions that hindered the effectiveness of the Human Rights Council in the past. We have partnered with a set of small states that feel as passionately about human rights as anyone – countries like Mauritius and Slovenia, just to name two. And together we have built a Human Rights Council that is far stronger and more capable than it was just three years ago.

And I thank all of the small states that have stood up and said, “We want the rule of law and human rights respected everywhere.” We’ve come a long way getting past the outdated divides. Yes, there is still north-south, there is still east-west, there is still developed and developing, but we ought to move toward a standard of expectation for all of our nations and hold ourselves to it.

Now there are a number of other areas where I know many of you are leaders – nonproliferation, peacekeeping, clean energy, just to name a few. And I want to assure you that the United States recognizes and appreciates the contributions that you are making to solving these important challenges. We are committed to continuing not only to work with you, but to learn from you. And so I appreciate this opportunity to express appreciation to you individually and through you to the forum for inviting the United States to be part of this conversation, and I look forward to our continued partnership together.

Thank you all very much. (Applause.)

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