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I have not been posting her tweets and Facebook posts. Here they are from the past week.

 

 

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Hillary took to social media to expose the study that the Trump regime tried to hide by releasing it on the slowest news day of the year. This is her Facebook post. You can RT her Tweets here >>>>

 

Thought I would tack this on here. Trump promised the residents of Tangier Island that he would protect them from the rising tides. But, never mind. He doesn’t believe the study from his own administration, soooo … I’m guessing it’s all a big “screw you” to Tangier Islanders. I think of them every time the topic arises. This article was originally published in September, 2014.

slate.com

On Tangier, a Disappearing Island

By Christian Storm

tangier2
Going under
Christian Storm/Business Insider

This article originally appeared in Business Insider.

If you stand at the end of the dock in Crisfield, Maryland, and gaze out over the water, you might not catch the tiny shape of a water tower barely visible on the horizon. And when you look at a map you can just as easily miss the tiny island that the tower sits on, 12 miles from either coast in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay. Largely unknown, Tangier Island, Virginia, is one of the most isolated and extraordinary places in the continental U.S.

It’s also in danger of disappearing. In 50 to 100 years, the water tower in the center of town may be all that’s left of the place.

Many of us have heard about far-off islands, like the Maldives or Kiribati, which are slowly sinking into the ocean because of erosion and rising sea levels. Far fewer know of Tangier, an island right here in the U.S. that’s currently only 4 feet or so above sea level at its highest point and that may soon suffer the same fate.

An Island Apart

tangier1Christian Storm/Business Insider

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As we put the 2018 mid-terms to bed, Hillary took to social media to deliver her message on the results.  Here is what she posted on Facebook. The same comments are also posted at her Twitter account.

 

Congratulations to all the voters, volunteers, organizers, and candidates who voted last night to put a powerful check on this administration and start building a better future for everyone in our country.

It was a historic night in so many ways: For the first time ever, over 100 women were elected to Congress—including a record number of women of color.

Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland will be the first Native American women to ever serve in Congress. Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar will be the first Muslim women to serve.

Ayanna Pressley and Jahana Hayes will be the first black women to represent Massachusetts and Connecticut in Congress, respectively. Tish James will be the first black woman to be New York’s attorney general.

Janet Mills will be the first woman governor of Maine. Cindy Axne and Abby Finkenauer will be the first women to represent Iowa in the House. Finkenauer and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are the youngest women to be elected to Congress ever.

The inspiring Lucy McBath became an activist for common-sense gun reform after her son, Jordan, was shot and killed. This cycle, she ran for Congress in a heavily Republican district in Georgia—and it looks likely she will win.

These historic firsts are important not just because representation matters (and it does), but because these extraordinary women will bring perspectives that have been absent from our policy debates for far too long.

There were important wins for rights, too, including Floridians voting to restore the voting rights of 1 million of their fellow citizens and Nevada approving automatic voter registration.

None of these victories would have been possible if people had simply given up after the heartbreak of 2016. They belong to all the volunteers and candidates who worked impossible hours, logged hundreds of miles, and knocked on countless doors.

Win or lose, what you’ve built will continue long after last night.

Our work is far from over. As we celebrate our wins, let’s be clear about what’s ahead.

This is a crucial step in a long road to repairing our democracy. It’ll take all of us to do it. What a start this is.

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