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Onward Together!

I’m so looking forward to this just-announced virtual event: On Tuesday, October 6th, I’ll be joining Stacey Abrams — along with singer, actor, and equal rights advocate Audra McDonald — for a special evening in support of Fair Fight PAC and Onward Together.
Get your ticket for the event now, and we’ll save you a spot.

No one knows better than Stacey Abrams how important it is to fight for every last vote. I’m so grateful to her for turning her attention to the critical issue of protecting voting rights across this country. The cost of your ticket will support Onward Together and Fair Fight PAC in that work this fall and for years to come.
We have a great deal of work ahead of us before November, so I hope you’ll join our conversation on Tuesday, October 6th at 7:30 p.m. ET:

Get your ticket

Thank you,

Hillary

 

Hillary Rodham Clinton

It’s crucial that Joe, Kamala, and Democrats down the ballot have all the resources they need to make these final few weeks count. The stakes in this election are high, the polls right now are tight, and this team knows best that presidential elections can come down to a narrow margin of victory — or loss.

That’s why I’m joining Kamala Harris next Monday, September 14th at 6:00 pm eastern for a grassroots event — to talk about how we must bring Americans across the country together to wage this fight.

I want you to be there for my first virtual grassroots event with Kamala. Chip in to power Joe, Kamala, and Democrats across the country to victory, and we’ll save you a spot to join us for this special event:

Donate now

I wish Donald Trump had been a better president. Because America needs a better president than this. America needs a president who shows the same compassion, determination, and leadership in the White House that we see in our communities.

Throughout this crisis, Americans have kept going — checking on neighbors, showing up to jobs at grocery stores and nursing homes. Because it still takes a village.

We need leaders equal to this moment. We need Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. But I can’t overstate how important our role is in helping Joe, Kamala, and Democrats down the ballot win this election.

I’m hoping you’ll join Kamala and me on Monday, September 14th at 6:00 pm eastern to discuss the work that needs to be done to elect Democrats down the ballot this year.

Will you pitch in now to RSVP to the virtual grassroots event?

I can tell you from experience: When an election is over, you really remember who stood by you, doing the hard work of fighting for every single vote.

So, I’m proud to stand with you, Joe, Kamala, and Democrats across the country in this fight — and I hope I see you at our event on Monday, September 14th.

Onward,

Hillary

Hillary Clinton offers cautionary tale about this election

Below is the text of Hillary’s speech on Wednesday night at the Democratic National Convention. Take a look, or watch the full speech here.

The morning after the last election, I said, “We owe Donald Trump an open mind and the chance to lead.” I meant it. Every president deserves that. And Trump came in with so much set up for him: A strong economy, plans for managing crises, including a pandemic. Yes, we Democrats would have disagreed with him on many things, but if he had put his own interests and ego aside — seen the humanity in a child ripped from her parents at the border or a protester calling for justice or a family wiped out by a natural disaster — that would have been a good thing, for America and the world.
I wish Donald Trump knew how to be a president, because America needs a president right now. Throughout this time of crisis, Americans keep going: checking on neighbors, showing up to jobs as first responders, hospitals, grocery stores, nursing homes. Yes, it still takes a village.
And we need leaders equal to this moment of sacrifice and service. We need Joe Biden and Kamala Harris.
Everyone has a story about Joe’s caring and empathy. I remember him calling after my mother, Dorothy, died, and we talked about being raised by strong women. The best testament to Joe is how he’s cared for his family. (And how great is it that Dr. Jill Biden plans to keep teaching as First Lady?) And Joe picked the right partner in Kamala. She’s relentless in the pursuit of justice and equity, and she’s kind. When her press secretary, Tyrone Gayle, was dying of cancer, she dropped everything to be with him in his final moments. I know something about the slings and arrows she’ll face, and believe me, this former District Attorney and Attorney General can handle them all.
So this is the team to pull our nation back from the brink. But they can’t do it without us.
For four years, people have told me, “I didn’t realize how dangerous he was.” “I wish I could do it all over.” Or worst, “I should have voted.” Look, this can’t be another woulda coulda shoulda election. If you vote by mail, request your ballot now, and send it back right away. If you vote in person, do it early. Become a poll worker. Most of all, no matter what, vote.
As Michelle Obama and Bernie Sanders warned us: If Trump is re-elected, things will get even worse. That’s why we need unity now more than ever. Remember back in 2016 when Trump asked: “What do you have to lose?” Well, now we know: our health care, our jobs, our loved ones. Our leadership in the world and even our post office. But let’s set our sights higher than getting one man out of the White House.
Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are going to give us so much to vote for. Let’s vote for the jobs that Joe’s plan will create, clean energy jobs to fight climate change, caregiving jobs with living wages. Vote for emergency relief that lifts small businesses and saves hardworking people from foreclosures and evictions. It’s wrong that billionaires got $400 billion richer during the pandemic while millions lost their $600 a week in extra unemployment.
Vote for parents and teachers struggling to balance children’s education and safety, and for health care workers fighting COVID-19 with little help from the White House.
Vote for paid family leave and health care for everyone, for Social Security, Medicare, and Planned Parenthood.
Vote for DREAMers and their families. Vote for law enforcement purged of racial bias, that keeps all our streets safe. Vote for justice for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, because Black Lives Matter.
Vote for honest elections, so we — not a foreign adversary — choose our president.
Vote for the diverse, hopeful America we saw in last night’s roll call. And don’t forget, Joe and Kamala can win by three million votes, and still lose. Take it from me. We need numbers so overwhelming, so Trump can’t sneak or steal his way to victory.
100 years ago yesterday, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified. It took seven decades of suffragists marching, picketing, and going to jail to push us closer to a more perfect union. 55 years ago, John Lewis marched and bled in Selma because that work was unfinished.
Tonight, I’m thinking of the girls and boys who see themselves in America’s future because of Kamala Harris – a Black woman, the daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, and our nominee for Vice President. This is our country’s story: breaking down barriers and expanding the circle of possibility. And to the young people watching: Don’t give up on America. Despite our flaws and problems, we’ve come so far. We can still be a more just, equal country, with opportunities previous generations could never have imagined.
There’s a lot of heartbreak in America now, and the truth is, many things were broken before the pandemic. But, as the saying goes, the world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are strong at the broken places. That’s Joe Biden. He knows how to keep going, unify, and lead, because he’s done that for his family and country.

So come November, if we’re strong together, we’ll heal together. We’ll redeem the soul and the promise of our country, led by President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris.Onward,

Hillary

Check your voter registration

Hillary Clinton never makes me cry. I love her (obviously). I am 100% with her on the “woulda, shoulda, coulda.” She did not evoke tears in me. She never has that I can remember. She always makes me feel like we can do it. Tears this week, for me, have been for the Americans who have testified about the deported at the border and the departed from COVID-19; lost jobs, farms, and small businesses; caged babies at the border; Estella; Kristin; the list goes on. Did I cry when Hillary spoke? Not at all. Her message was strong, galvanizing as it always has been and remains. We can do this, and we must. N.B. It is not about making history or who makes it. It about saving our democracy. #GetOutTheVote

 

Onward Together!

This summer hasn’t looked the way any of us expected. This administration’s handling of a global health crisis has been frustrating on their best day and cruel on their worst. I’m thinking of every person who has been affected by this pandemic, and I’m grateful for the continued work of those who have been keeping our hospitals, our businesses, and even our families running without much support from the White House.

I hope that, despite everything, you’ve found time to safely connect with loved ones, do some yoga, or disappear into a good book. I was lucky enough to get an advanced copy of my friend Louise Penny’s latest mystery novel, and while I won’t spoil anything, it was the perfect escape. I’ve also been spending much of my time talking with a number of smart, fascinating people for my new podcast, and I can’t wait to share those conversations with you.

Like many of you, I’m still mourning the death of Congressman John Lewis. John was the truest kind of patriot. He believed America could live up to its highest founding ideals of equality and liberty for all. I was honored to call him a friend, and I’m so proud of the Onward Together team members who have been relentless in making what John called “good trouble”:

  • In the midst of a pandemic that is disproportionately affecting people of color, Latino Victory is doubling down on electing candidates who understand the challenges that women of color are facing right now. Last month, they launched the First Latinas program to increase representation in government by electing Latina women who are running for seats that have never had a Latina representative or who will achieve a ‘first’ milestone.
  • For organizations that work directly with voters, this election looks different than any others. But our partners have quickly redirected their efforts online to ensure the safety of staff and voters alike; the Alliance for Youth Action put together a list of online steps for becoming an at-home organizer, while Run for Something collected resources for first-time candidates to navigate this new reality. And Arena launched their Academy 201, where political professionals can participate in free, advanced trainings on everything from how to deal with rapidly-changing plans to how to center racial equity in a campaign environment.
  • And of course, Color of Change has continued to lead the fight to end practices — including police brutality, voter suppression, and uneven access to health care — that hold Black people back.

It’s up to us now to continue John’s work, and I know I can count on this team to do just that. With November drawing closer, the most important thing you can do right now is to vote and ensure others can vote, too. Visit iwillvote.com to confirm your registration or request an absentee ballot, then head to democracydocket.com to get the latest in the fight to give more voters access to mail-in voting.

Onward,

Hillary

 

Clinton Foundation

Statement from President Bill Clinton and Secretary Hillary Clinton on the Passing of Congressman John Lewis

We have lost a giant. John Lewis gave all he had to redeem America’s unmet promise of equality and justice for all, and to create a place for us to build a more perfect union together.

From a small farm in Alabama, to life-risking service in the civil rights movement, to three decades in Congress, he was always “walking with the wind,” steered by a moral compass that told him when to make good trouble and when to heal troubled waters. Always true to his word, his faith, and his principles, John Lewis became the conscience of the nation.

Hillary and I loved John. We were blessed by his friendship, support, and wise counsel. We’ll miss him so much, but we’ll always be grateful to God for his long good life, and grateful that he lived to see a new generation of Americans take to the streets in search of his long sought “beloved community.”

Our hearts go out to his son John-Miles and the entire Lewis family, his able loyal staff, and all who loved and admired him the world over.

Onward Together!

We’ve got big news:

On Thursday, July 16th, we’re hosting an exclusive virtual event featuring Hillary in conversation with Pete Buttigieg. Congresswoman Lauren Underwood will be moderating, and we’d love for you to join us, too.

Grab your ticket now for the conversation at 7:00 p.m. ET on Thursday, July 16th.

You're invited to an event with Hillary and Pete ButtigiegIt’s been a while since we all checked in, and there’s a lot to cover. After you get your ticket, you’ll be able to submit a question for Hillary and Pete — you might even get the chance to ask your question live on Zoom during the event.

We hope we’ll see you for the virtual event next month:
Get your ticket
Talk soon,
Onward Together

 

Onward Together!

Every time there is a long line at a polling place, a ballot isn’t counted, or voting is anything but a straightforward, simple process accessible to all citizens, it’s a threat to our democracy. In the midst of a global pandemic, it’s up to us to prevent a public health crisis from exacerbating a democratic one — and one solution is dramatically expanding and safeguarding vote by mail so that Americans can cast their ballots this November.

Onward Together is proud to have teamed up with Democracy Docket in the fight to ensure that all Americans can have their ballot counted this fall — while remaining safe and healthy.

Elections matter, and all too often, small differences in voting totals can change the course of history. In 2018, the U.S. Senate race in Florida was decided by 10,033 votes and the gubernatorial race was decided by 32,463 votes. A study of more than 30,000 rejected mail ballots found that the rejection rate for vote by mail ballots for the youngest voters was nearly ten times the rejection rate for those over 65. Meanwhile, mail ballots cast by minority voters were more than twice as likely to be rejected than mail ballots cast by white absentee mail voters.

Similarly, a study of rejected mail ballots from Georgia’s closely contested 2018 election found that newly registered, young, female, and minority voters were more likely to have their ballots rejected.

We can protect our democracy from unfair, unequal laws — but we have to push election officials to do the right thing as soon as possible. If you’re able to, please make a contribution to fund this work:

Donate now

Thank you, and onward,

Hillary

P.S. If you’d like to keep up with Democracy Docket, sign up here to receive their newsletter.

Hillary Clinton in a scene from the Hulu documentary "Hillary."

Hillary Clinton in a scene from the Hulu documentary “Hillary.” (Barbara Kinney / Hulu)

 

By Glenn WhippEntertainment Columnist

Since “Hillary,” Hulu’s four-part documentary about Hillary Clinton, premiered in early March, America has been devastated by a pandemic and convulsed by nationwide protests following the police killing of George Floyd.

Clinton understands the despair that drives the protests and pervades the country in the wake of more than 100,000 pandemic deaths and one in four American workers filing for unemployment insurance.

But she also sees signs for cautious optimism.

“If you look at the young people who are the primary movers of the peaceful protests in response to Mr. Floyd’s killing, I’m hopeful that this can break open not only some hearts but some structural impediments to equality and justice in a way that defies the distraction of the second-to-second demands of social media,” Clinton says.

Read more >>>>

Onward Together!
George Floyd’s life mattered. Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor’s lives mattered. Black lives matter.

Against a backdrop of a pandemic that has disproportionately ravaged communities of color, we are being painfully reminded right now that we are long overdue for honest reckoning and meaningful action to dismantle systemic racism.

If you’re in a place to give, donate today to support groups working to end systemic racial injustice, increase the elected representation of Black people, and fight Republican efforts to suppress Black votes.

Collective Future is working to recruit, train, and fund Black judicial, prosecutorial and attorney general candidates to ensure more representative leaders for the criminal justice system. Color of Change is a national online force dedicated to holding corporations and elected leaders accountable in the fight to end practices and systems that unfairly hold Black people back. Higher Heights supports the Black women’s leadership pipeline. And the NAACP Legal Defense Fund works toward racial justice through litigation, advocacy, and public education.

What we are seeing across the country right now is the power of solidarity. Many of us will never know the pain of having to sit our son or daughter down and have “the talk” about how carefully they need to act around police, because the slightest wrong move could get them hurt or even killed. But we can recognize our privilege, practice humility, and speak out against white supremacy in all its forms.

For many white people, conversations about systemic racism and our own privilege are uncomfortable. Here’s what I’ve learned over the years: That discomfort is a good thing. It’s a necessary part of examining our own biases and actions, and our own role in perpetuating inequality.

One of the most important steps we can take is to educate ourselves. Ijeoma Oluo’s So You Want To Talk About Race is a great and thoughtful starting point, as is White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin Diangelo. If you’re looking for fiction, Alice Walker’s The Color Purple and Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye both tackle race, gender, and violence through the lens of Black womanhood.

These are tumultuous times for America. But we cannot turn a blind eye to what’s happening right now. We should listen, and learn, and participate in building a country that lives up to our highest ideals. The only way out is through.

I promise to keep fighting alongside all of you to make the United States a place where all men and all women are treated as equals, just as we are and just as we deserve to be.

Onward,

Hillary

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