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Hillary Clinton in Denver

Hillary was at the Bellco Theatre at the Colorado Convention Center this evening.

denverpost.com

Hillary Clinton speaks in Denver

John Leyba, The Denver Pos Hilary Clinton addresses the audience about her new book, “What Happened” on Nov. 16, 2017 at the Bellco Theatre at the Colorado Convention Center.

Jesse Paul

Hillary Clinton, in a Denver appearance Thursday night, called Colorado a “state that is really about the future,” urging Democrats — and women in particular — to keep up their activism and push back against the political polarization that dominated last year’s presidential election.

Clinton also raised a red flag about Russian interference in her contest against Donald Trump, saying it poses a “clear and present danger to Western Democracy.”

“This isn’t just about what happened. It’s about what’s happening right now,” she said while promoting her new book about the campaign, “What Happened.”

“Trump is playing right into (Russian President Vladimir) Putin’s hands. This is shameful.”

The appearance at the Bellco Theatre at the Colorado Convention Center was the Democrat’s first public one in Colorado since losing the 2016 election to Trump. Clinton covered a range of issues, from the opioid epidemic to her grandchildren, in about an hour.

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Tickets are available!

Description

VENUE UPDATE: The book signing has changed venues. It is now located at Butler Center Gallery, 401 President Clinton Ave., Little Rock, AR 72201. Books-A-Million invites you to attend Hillary Rodham Clinton’s book signing event featuring her extraordinary new book What Happened ($30.00 Simon & Schuster) at the Butler Center Gallery. Eventbrite tickets are required to attend this event.

Date and Time

Sat, Nov 18, 2017, 10:30 AM CST

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Location

Butler Center Gallery401 President Clinton Avenue

Little Rock, AR 72201

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Hillary is scheduled to be honored own her home turf this month.

lohud.com

Hillary Clinton keynote speaker at Westchester business council dinner

Jordan Fenster, jfenster@lohud.com Published 3:37 p.m. ET Nov. 16, 2017

Hillary Clinton — Chappaqua resident, former senator, U.S. secretary of state and 2016 Democratic nominee for president of the United States  — is scheduled to be the featured speaker at the Business Council of Westchester’s annual fall dinner.

Clinton will also accept the organization’s Westchester Global Leadership Laureate Award from CEO Marsha Gordon.

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Her office is in the theatre district, but it has been awhile since Hillary has treated herself to a show. Sunday night she was feted at Town Hall by a slew of stars at a Planned Parenthood fundraiser, and last night she saw the Tony Award winning Dear Evan Hansen.

This is a snide article, but here it is. The photo is nice.

Broadway Stars Honor Hillary Clinton At Planned Parenthood Fundraiser

“Find out who you want to be our next president”

Broadway stars were proud to host failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on Sunday night for “an evening that was all about women, by women, and for women,” according to InStyle.

“Tony and Grammy winners packed The Town Hall theater in N.Y.C. for a special concert all about women’s empowerment called ‘Double Standards,'” reports InStyle. “Everyone from ‘Waitress’ lyricist Sara Bareilles to ‘The Great Comet of 1812’s’ former Sonya Rostova, Ingrid Michaelson, sang about women’s rights, Hillary Clinton, and standing up in the face of the patriarchy, with 100 percent of the proceeds from the concert tickets and donations going toward Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, and the Breast Cancer Coalition.”

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This article is much nicer, and. Ben Platt, clearly, was thrilled

Hillary Clinton signed Ben Platt’s cast after a ‘Dear Evan Hansen’ show

The cast of Dear Evan Hansen got a surprise on Wednesday evening—as did the literal cast from the award-winning Broadway musical.Hillary Clinton attended the show and got some face time with the show’s Tony-winning star Ben Platt on Wednesday.Platt tweeted photos of the meeting, calling her “Our real president” and showing off that she signed his character’s infamous cast.

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It’s been a busy few weeks. I’ve been traveling across the country and internationally — as the great-granddaughter of a Welsh coal miner, I was delighted to spend time in Wales last month. In Charlottesville, I sat down with the wonderful First Lady of Virginia, Dorothy McAuliffe, for a conversation on women’s leadership around the world. And in Wisconsin, I spent some time talking about my book What Happened with the ever-charming Bradley Whitford.

On a more personal note, I was lucky enough to celebrate my birthday with my family and friends last month. While this last year hasn’t been what any of us had envisioned, I’m so grateful to be able to spend time with loved ones — especially my grandchildren, who are growing up so fast. Charlotte even made me a little birthday cake. I don’t want to brag, but it was delicious.

As we head into a new year, there’s no doubt that the next few months will be critical for the future of our country. I wanted to highlight the efforts here of another group that Onward Together supports: Swing Left, which is working to take back the House in 2018.

We have an opportunity to elect more smart, strong progressives who will fight for the values that you and I share — but we all need to work together to make that happen. I hope you’ll read more about Swing Left below and sign up to join this work. There’s no time to waste.

Onward!

Hillary


Onward Together works to build a brighter future for generations to come by supporting groups that encourage people to organize in their communities or run for office. Because you’re an important part of Onward Together, we wanted you to get a chance to know these groups a little bit better. To learn more about Onward Together, click here.
The organization: Swing Left

The founders: Ethan Todras-Whitehill, writer and teacher, Joshua Krafchin, entrepreneur, and Miriam Stone, brand strategist.

The mission: Take back the House in 2018 by recruiting and mobilizing volunteers to support Democratic candidates in swing districts, where votes will count the most.

The story: In the wake of the 2016 election, Ethan, Joshua, Miriam, and friends turned their myriad talents toward taking back the House. The day before Trump’s inauguration, they launched a website that matches volunteers with their closest 2018 swing district and connects them with impactful ways to help. More than 200,000 people signed up in the first week alone.

The latest: With the support Swing Left has received from Onward Together and others, the organization has continued to grow. Their volunteers are organizing early and, with a year to go until the midterms, have already held over 1,200 voter contact events in 50 Swing Districts. They’re also fundraising for Democratic candidates — in less than 48 hours after the House Trumpcare vote, they raised more than $1 million for the eventual challengers to the Republicans who voted “yes.” Last month Swing Left added WI-01, Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan’s district, to its map of targeted races.

The next step: Swing Left is working now to build the 2018 campaigns-in-waiting. Visit swingleft.org/join to find your closest Swing District and join the fight.

Here is how the Trump administration is about to support terrorists. The keyword here is “trophy.” Hunting endangered species is not a sport. Those who engage in it are not sportsmen. This is an industry that funds terrorist organizations including Al Qaida, ISIS, Al Shabab, Boko Haram, and more. This makes the U.S. a state sponsor of terrorism.


The Trump administration is reversing an Obama administration ban on bringing to the United States the heads of elephants killed in two African countries.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) said it has determined that hunting African elephants in Zimbabwe and Zambia “will enhance the survival of the species in the wild,” which is the standard by which officials judge whether to allow imports of parts – known as trophies – of the animals.

“Legal, well-regulated sport hunting as part of a sound management program can benefit the conservation of certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,” an FWS spokesman said in a statement late Wednesday, after hunting group Safari Club International announced the policy.

Imports will be allowed for elephants killed between Jan. 21, 2016 and the end of 2018.

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ICYMI, Hillary Clinton has long been an advocate for wildlife and not for warm, fuzzy reasons. This is a monstrous industry. Both animals and humans suffer as a result. As she explained as secretary of state, wildlife conservation and protection is a national and international security issue.

 

November 8, 2012 by still4hill

Remarks at the Partnership Meeting on Wildlife Trafficking
Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton

Secretary of State

Benjamin Franklin Room

Washington, DC

November 8, 2012


Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you all very much. Well, it’s a great delight to see all of you here. And as I look out on this audience, I see many familiar faces from the diplomatic community. And I especially thank each and every one of you for being here on this important issue. Congressman Moran, thank you for joining us today. I’d also like to welcome Deputy Administrator Steinberg from USAID, Naoko Ishii of the Global Environmental Facility. Thanks to Under Secretary Bob Hormats for his commitment to this issue, along with Under Secretary Maria Otero and Under Secretary Tara Sonenshine and Assistant Secretary Kerri-Ann Jones, and many others here in the State Department, and particularly all of you from the conservation and wildlife community and the private sector who have been involved in this issue for many years and have done extraordinary work. Unfortunately, we now find ourselves with all of that positive effort that started 30, 40 years ago being affected by changes that we have to address at every level of the international community.

Now, some of you might be wondering why a Secretary of State is keynoting an event about wildlife trafficking and conservation, or why we are hosting this event at the State Department in the first place. Well, I think it’s because, as Bob Hormats has just pointed out, and as the public service announcements reinforce, over the past few years wildlife trafficking has become more organized, more lucrative, more widespread, and more dangerous than ever before.

As the middle class grows, which we all welcome and support, in many nations items like ivory or rhinoceros horn become symbols of wealth and social status. And so the demand for these goods rises. By some estimates, the black market in wildlife is rivaled in size only by trade in illegal arms and drugs. Today, ivory sells for nearly $1,000 per pound. Rhino horns are literally worth their weight in gold, $30,000 per pound.

What’s more, we are increasingly seeing wildlife trafficking has serious implications for the security and prosperity of people around the world. Local populations that depend on wildlife, either for tourism or sustenance, are finding it harder and harder to maintain their livelihoods. Diseases are spreading to new corners of the globe through wildlife that is not properly inspected at border crossings. Park rangers are being killed. And we have good reason to believe that rebel militias are players in a worldwide ivory market worth millions and millions of dollars a year.

So yes, I think many of us are here because protecting wildlife is a matter of protecting our planet’s natural beauty. We see it’s a stewardship responsibility for us and this generation and future generations to come. But it is also a national security issue, a public health issue, and an economic security issue that is critical to each and every country represented here.

We all, unfortunately, contribute to the continued demand for illegal animal goods. Wildlife might be targeted and killed across Asia and Africa, but their furs, tusks, bones, and horns are sold all over the world. Smuggled goods from poached animals find their way to Europe, Australia, China, and the United States. I regret to say the United States is the second-largest destination market for illegally trafficked wildlife in the world. And that is something we are going to address.

Now, several conservation groups are here with us today, and we greatly appreciate their invaluable work. But the truth is they cannot solve this problem alone. None of us can. This is a global challenge that spans continents and crosses oceans, and we need to address it with partnerships that are as robust and far-reaching as the criminal networks we seek to dismantle.

Therefore, we need governments, civil society, businesses, scientists, and activists to come together to educate people about the harms of wildlife trafficking. We need law enforcement personnel to prevent poachers from preying on wildlife. We need trade experts to track the movement of goods and help enforce existing trade laws. We need finance experts to study and help undermine the black markets that deal in wildlife. And most importantly, perhaps, we need to reach individuals, to convince them to make the right choices about the goods they purchase.

Now, there’s no quick fix, but by working closely, internationally, with all of these partners, we can take important steps to protect wildlife in their environments and begin to dry up the demand for trafficked goods. So with these goals in mind, the State Department is pursuing a four-part strategy.

First, on the diplomatic front, we are working with leaders from around the world to develop a global consensus on wildlife protection. I spoke with President Putin, Ambassador, when we were together at the APEC summit in Vladivostok. He has been a staunch, vocal, public supporter of Russian wildlife. And I think it’s fair to say his personal efforts over the last years have made the lives of tigers in Russia much safer. There’s still poaching, but at least there is a commitment from the highest level of the Russian Government to protect the wildlife of Russia. In fact, when I was in Vladivostok, there were posters everywhere with tigers on the pictures on the lampposts and walls and everywhere we looked, reminding people that this was an important issue to Russia and the Russian Government. And I worked – I had the great privilege of working with President Putin and the other leaders there to make sure that the leaders’ statement that was issued included, for the first time ever, strong language on wildlife trafficking.

Now, Undersecretaries Bob Hormats and Maria Otero have met with African and Asian leaders to discuss the immediate actions needed to thwart poachers. Next week, President Obama and I will personally bring this message to our partners in ASEAN and the East Asia Summit when we meet in Phnom Penh.

We are also pressing forward with efforts to protect marine life. And last week, we joined forces with New Zealand to propose the world’s largest marine protected area, the Ross Sea region of Antarctica. And we hope to gain support from the international community as this important proposal moves forward.

We’re strengthening our ability to engage diplomatically on these and other scientific issues. Building scientific partnerships is an important tool in addressing such global challenges. That’s why I’m pleased to announce our three new science envoys, Dr. Bernard Amadei of the University of Colorado, the founder of Engineers Without Borders; Dr. Susan Hockfield, the former president and currently faculty member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and renowned evolutionary biologist Dr. Barbara Schaal of Washington University in St. Louis. Are these three scientists with us today? Are they? Okay. But I think it’s working to create a scientific consensus and very preeminent scientists from across the world speaking out that is one of the important steps that we are urging partners to join with us in doing.

Secondly, we are reaching beyond governments to enlist the support of people. As part of this effort, Under Secretary Tara Sonenshine, our Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy, is spearheading a global outreach campaign which we will launch December 4th on Wildlife Conservation Day. Our embassies will use every tool at their disposal to raise awareness about this issue, from honoring local activists, to spreading the word on Facebook and Twitter. We want to make buying goods, products from trafficked wildlife, endangered species unacceptable, socially unacceptable. We want friends to tell friends they don’t want friends who ingest, display, or otherwise use products that come from endangered species anywhere in the world.

Third, we’re launching new initiatives to strengthen and expand enforcement areas. USAID has already provided more than $24 million over the past five years on a range of programs that combat wildlife crimes. Last year, they launched the ARREST program, which is establishing regional centers of expertise and expanding training programs for law enforcement. We really want to work with all of you, and we want both from countries that are victimized by trafficking to countries where consumers are the end-buyers of such products.

Finally, this is a global issue, and it calls, therefore, for a concerted global response. So I hope every government and organization here today will join the Coalition Against Wildlife Trafficking. That is the global partnership for sharing information on poachers and illicit traders. We’ll also be convening meetings with traditional stakeholders like NGOs and governments and with less traditional stakeholders like air and cruise line companies to discuss new potential partnerships.

Some of the most successful initiatives we’ve seen so far are the regional wildlife enforcement networks. These networks are critical to strengthening protection efforts and enhancing cooperation among key countries. To build on these efforts, today I’m calling for the creation of a global system of regional wildlife enforcement networks to take advantage of those networks that already are operating and the lessons we have learned from them. The sooner we get this off the ground, the better, and to that end, the State Department is pledging $100,000 to help get this new global system up and running.

I want to mention one last step we’re taking. Trafficking relies on porous borders, corrupt officials, and strong networks of organized crime, all of which undermine our mutual security. I’m asking the intelligence community to produce an assessment of the impact of large-scale wildlife trafficking on our security interests so we can fully understand what we’re up against. When I was in Africa last summer, I was quite alarmed by the level of anxiety I heard from leaders. It is one thing to be worried about the traditional poachers who come in and kill and take a few animals, a few tusks, a few horns, or other animal parts. It’s something else when you’ve got helicopters, night vision goggles, automatic weapons, which pose a threat to human life as well as wildlife. Local communities are becoming terrified. Local leaders are telling their national leaders that they can lose control of large swaths of territory to these criminal gangs. Where criminal gangs can come and go at their total discretion, we know that begins to provide safe havens for other sorts of threats to people and governments.

So I think we have to look at this in a comprehensive, holistic way. And there’s something for everybody. If you love animals, if you want to see a more secure world, if you want our economy not to be corrupted globally by this kind of illicit behavior, there is so much we can do together. After all, the world’s wildlife, both on land and in our waters, is such a precious resource, but it is also a limited one. It cannot be manufactured. And once it’s gone, it cannot be replenished. And those who profit from it illegally are not just undermining our borders and our economies. They are truly stealing from the next generation. So we have to work together to stop them and ensure a sustainable future for our wildlife, the people who live with them, and the people who appreciate them everywhere. So let me thank you all for being here. I really appreciate the turnout, and it means a great deal and the fact that so many ambassadors are here representing their countries – and I particularly want to thank our colleagues, the Ambassador of Kenya, the Ambassador from Indonesia, for taking a leading role in this effort. We want to hear your ideas. These are our ideas, but we really are soliciting your ideas – what works, what can we do better, how can we make a difference. Let’s put the poachers out of business and build a more secure and prosperous world for all of us, and particularly for children generations to come.

Thank you, all. (Applause.)

 

Remarks for Wildlife Trafficking Day

Remarks

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Washington, DC
December 3, 2012

December 4th will be the first ever Wildlife Conservation Day.  And I have instructed U.S. diplomatic missions around the world to work to raise awareness about wildlife trafficking – some will host events, others will start a conversation with various communities.  Our goal is to inform more people about this global conservation crisis.Attacks on elephants and rhinos are multiplying at an alarming rate.  Species around the globe such as tigers in Asia are endangered.  Poaching operations are using more sophisticated weapons that threaten security and stability.  By some estimates, the black market for wildlife trafficking is rivaled in size only by the illegal arms and drug trade.

The slaughter of endangered species robs communities of income from tourism, reduces biodiversity, encourages corruption, undermines good governance.
That’s why we are training officials and educating prosecutors and judges about wildlife crimes; why we are helping countries strengthen their own laws; why we are supporting efforts to squeeze trafficking networks.  And we are helping to create wildlife enforcement networks from Central America to South Asia.

But let’s face it: we can’t do this without you.  You have the choice to refuse to purchase products made from endangered wildlife; you have the choice to stand up and speak out against these criminal networks; you have the choice to hold your governments accountable for their actions to protect endangered species and stop this trade.

So please, join us, become part of the solution.  Visit the website www.wildlifepledge.org.  Take the pledge to respect and protect the world’s wildlife.  Together I believe we can save these endangered animals before it is too late.  We can strengthen developing economies, we can bolster peace and security, and protect the world’s ecosystems.  But it is up to you and to me.  So let’s get started.  Thank you.

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